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NEWS
January 9, 2012
Yemen's cabinet approved a law Sunday granting President Ali Abdullah Saleh and anyone who has worked under him immunity from prosecution for crimes committed during his 33-year rule. The decision surprised many in Yemen, who believed a power-transfer deal he signed in November granted Saleh and his family immunity from prosecution for the killings of protesters, but would not extend to cover his three-decade rule and anyone who worked in government. The cabinet approved the law despite daily protests demanding the longtime leader be put on trial for the killing of hundreds of people in raids on protest camps.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Ahmed al-Haj and Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
SANAA, Yemen - The grim prospect of civil war in Yemen has drawn closer as mutinous soldiers become more deeply involved in a rapidly spreading battle against regime forces for control of the capital. A negotiated cease-fire Tuesday halted three days of fighting that killed dozens of people, but it will not hold without a quick resolution of the key dispute: who will lead the nation. A peaceful way out of Yemen's seven-month crisis may not come easily, if at all, making it more likely to be settled in large-scale and ruinous street battles pitting renegade army soldiers and their allied tribal fighters against U.S.-trained forces loyal to embattled President Ali Abdullah Saleh and led by his son and onetime heir apparent, Ahmed.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - Military forces and police snipers opened fire Monday on marchers calling for the ouster of Yemen's embattled president, killing at least 15 people and sending a strong message of defiance to U.S. and European envoys seeking to broker a peace deal after months of bloodshed. The melee in the southern city of Taiz - part of an intensifying crackdown on the opposition - underscored the resolve of President Ali Abdullah Saleh to cling to power even as protest crowds resist withering attacks and crucial allies switch sides and call for an end to his 32-year rule.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Jamal al-Jashini and Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
SANA'A, Yemen - A U.S.-backed deal for Yemen's authoritarian president to step down fell far short of the demands of protesters who fought regime supporters on the streets of Sana'a Thursday in clashes that left five dead. The agreement ending President Ali Abdullah Saleh's 33-year rule provides for only the shallowest of changes at the top of the regime, something the U.S. administration likely favored to preserve a fragile alliance against one of the world's most active al-Qaeda branches based in Yemen.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - Even in the best of times, Yemen looks like a nation about to unravel. Now that the U.S.-allied leader has left Yemen for medical treatment and may not return, citizens of the poorest Arab country are contemplating a future perhaps even worse than the 33 years under authoritarian rule. The question of who would ultimately replace President Ali Abdullah Saleh could unleash new and unpredictable power struggles among the country's powerful tribes, the youth movement that has led the anti-Saleh protests, and remnants of the leader's regime, including his son. In the meantime, the numerous conflicts and economic and social problems that were already leading Yemen to ever-greater disorder and hardship before this year's unrest broke out look certain to remain unaddressed as the political crisis deepens.
NEWS
January 10, 2012 | By Ahmed Al-Haj and Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - A new law granting sweeping immunity to Yemen's president and anyone who served in his authoritarian regime over the last 33 years sparked fresh violence Monday and brought condemnation from human-rights groups. The law passed late Sunday by the cabinet, just weeks before President Ali Abdullah Saleh is supposed to step down, is part of a U.S.-backed effort to end the country's political quagmire. But the broad immunity from prosecution has only set off new debates about whether it gives suspected war criminals and corrupt officials a free pass or is a sacrifice necessary for Yemen to move on. The immunity would also cover those behind deadly crackdowns that have killed more than 200 protesters in Yemen's 11-month uprising - part of the Arab Spring revolts that have swept through countries in the Middle East and North Africa.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - A suicide attacker driving a pickup truck packed with explosives blew himself up outside an army camp in Yemen's coastal city of Aden on Sunday, killing at least eight soldiers and wounding dozens, security officials said. The officials said the blast occurred near the gate of the camp as a column of vehicles loaded with troops and supplies was preparing to leave for nearby Abyan province to take part in fighting against al-Qaeda-linked militants. Among the dead were two senior officers, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - The U.S.-backed president of Yemen suffered a devastating political blow Sunday when his own powerful tribe demanded his resignation, joining religious leaders, young people, and the country's traditional opposition in calls for an end to his three decades in power. Tens of thousands of angry residents flooded cities and towns around the impoverished and volatile nation, screaming in grief and anger as they mourned dozens of protesters killed Friday when President Ali Abdullah Saleh's security forces opened fire from rooftops on a demonstration in the capital.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After you have said that Eric Hansen was born in San Francisco in 1948 and educated as an architect at the University of California, you have made about all the connections you can between us workaday slobs and this latter-day Sinbad. Hansen is a middle-aged daydream in the flesh, a guy who has spent a good deal of the last 20 years "floating on the world" and "trying to lead as many different kinds of lives as possible. " Over the years, this witty, gritty globe-trotter has survived shipwrecks; worked as a barber in Mother Teresa's home for lepers; smuggled polyester saris from the Maldives to Sri Lanka, and transported false eyelashes from Thailand to Burma.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
A senior al-Qaeda militant in Yemen linked to the deadly bombing of a U.S. warship there in 2000 was reported killed in an air strike Sunday. A6.
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NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - The president of Yemen on Thursday warned that the al-Qaeda branch in the country was expanding and using assassinations and abductions of foreigners as a way to challenge the central authority. President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi issued his warning during a closed session of the National Dialogue, which brings political, religious, and other leaders together to decide on the country's political system before writing a constitution. The official SABA news agency said Hadi held an "exceptional" meeting, but offered few details on the president's remarks about security in the county.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Ahmed Al-haj and Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - The cleric preached in his tiny Yemeni village about the evils of al-Qaeda, warning residents to stay away from the group's fighters. The talk worried residents, who feared it would bring retaliation from the extremists, and even the cleric's father wanted him to stop. In the end it wasn't al-Qaeda that killed Sheikh Salem Ahmed bin Ali Jaber - but a U.S. drone. Yemeni security officials confirmed that three extremists - along with Salem and his cousin, who were going to meet them apparently to discuss his sermons - were killed in a drone strike in August.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
CAIRO - The deputy leader of al-Qaeda in Yemen slammed Saudi Arabia's policy of allowing the United States to launch deadly drone strikes from bases in the kingdom, calling on Saudis, in a new audio message released Wednesday, to revolt against the ruling family. Saeed al-Shihri's statement appeared to back up al-Qaeda denials this week that he was killed in a drone attack. The Saudi national was reported killed by a U.S. drone strike earlier this year by Yemeni security officials, based on alleged Saudi intelligence.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
SOME FACTS about America's drone warfare: *  The U.S. military now has 8,000 drones (military designation: UAV, for unmanned aerial vehicle) with plans to add more. There are several types: The MQ-1B Predator is 27 feet long with a wingspan of 55 feet and the ability to fire two Hellfire missiles. *  Most drones are operated remotely from military sites in Nevada, Texas and elsewhere, plus a site near the CIA headquarters, in Virginia. The drones themselves take off from bases in southern Afghanistan, Djibouti, and - it was just revealed this week - Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Egyptian rallies mark uprising CAIRO - Egyptian security forces fired tear gas, and protesters hurled stones and Molotov cocktails in a daylong demonstration Thursday, raising fears of a violent anniversary of the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. Youth activists and opposition groups have called for large rallies on the anniversary Friday in Cairo's Tahrir Square and in front of the presidential palace in the upscale suburb, Heliopolis. The protests, which left dozens injured, began before dawn in central Cairo when protesters tried to tear down a concrete wall built to prevent them from reaching the parliament and the cabinet building.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
CHICAGO - David Coleman Headley - son of the late Serrill Headley, onetime owner of the Khyber Pass bar, in Old City - was sentenced Thursday to 35 years in prison for helping to plan a deadly attack in 2008 in Mumbai, India, in which 160 people died, including children. Others victimized by the attack, which has been called India's 9/11, said that they were disturbed and upset that Headley, who cooperated with authorities, did not get the maximum life sentence that he faced. With credit for good behavior, the 52-year-old Headley could walk out of prison before he turns 80. SANAA, YEMEN - Al Qaeda's No. 2 in Yemen, Saeed al-Shihri, died of wounds suffered in a U.S. drone attack in October in southern Yemen, the country's official news agency and a security official said Thursday.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
BERLIN - The U.N. labor agency warns that the lingering effects of the global economic crisis means that unemployment will continue to rise - even though world economies are expected to pick up. The International Labor Organization (ILO) said in a report to be released Tuesday that the net number of unemployed people rose by 4 million in 2012 to 197 million overall. It is expected to rise by 5.1 million in 2013, and by another 3 million in 2014. According to ILO Director-General Guy Ryder, "An uncertain economic outlook, and the inadequacy of policy to counter this, has weakened aggregate demand, holding back investment and hiring.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SANA'A, Yemen - Gunmen in Yemen opened fire on the car of a Saudi Arabian army officer working with his embassy's military section on Wednesday, killing him and his Yemeni bodyguard, officials from both countries said. Yemeni officials said the Saudi officer, who had diplomatic status, was traveling to the embassy when he was shot by gunmen wearing army uniforms in another car. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief reporters. Saudi Arabia maintains close ties with Yemen, the poorest country in the Arab world and home to an al-Qaeda branch considered to be the terror network's most dangerous.
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - Suspected al-Qaeda suicide bombers disguised in military uniforms stormed into an army base in Yemen on Friday, killing 14 soldiers and wounding more than 20, Yemeni officials said. The dawn assault on the coastal base in Abyan province involved four suicide bombers in an army pickup truck laden with explosives and a gun battle with soldiers who were caught sleeping. The attack highlights the increasingly brazen tactics used by militants in this impoverished Arab Peninsula country and the many challenges Yemen's new leadership faces as it struggles, with U.S. help, to route militants and bring security to the nation.
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