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Yo Yo

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1989 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
The Smothers Brothers have had their ups and downs as entertainers, but never so literally as in their videocassette from Kodak Video Programs, The Yo-Yo Man Instructional Video. It's a lighthearted how-to on all aspects of yo-yo handling that hums along as slickly as a good sleeper. On the same stage as their revived TV series, The New Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, Dick Smothers introduces brother Tom as the quintessential nerd who couldn't win friends or influence people until he traveled the mystical path to the state of Yo. Under the tutelage of the enigmatic Yo Master, Tom learned the skills that transformed him from a nebbish into the charismatic Yo-Yo Man. This is the cute but convoluted pretext for introducing a solemn young yo- yo expert who is identified as Daniel Volk on the box but left uncredited on the tape itself.
SPORTS
January 17, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE CEMETERY in Southwest Philadelphia is an abandoned, tumbledown ruin, overgrown in many places, gravestones knocked on their sides. To attempt to find a grave there, amid tens of thousands of graves, would have been impossible without the help of the Friends of Mount Moriah Cemetery, a volunteer group working to preserve and restore the property. The email was answered within a day or so. Harry Shifren's grave is in Section K, Range 29, Lot 41. With a map, it took only a few minutes to find.
NEWS
October 8, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The New Jersey Assembly took the unusual step yesterday of voting to ban a consumer product from being sold in the state. The Yo Yo Water Ball, a liquid-filled ball attached to a stretchy cord that sells for $1 to $5 under a variety of names, has been blamed in hundreds of injuries to children nationwide. But the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission determined that the rate and severity of injuries thus far did not warrant action against the product, millions of which have been sold.
SPORTS
December 16, 2004 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim O'Brien has a set way for the 76ers to play offense and defense, but it's the coach's yo-yo strategy that is getting the most raves right now in his team's three-game winning streak. There are no X's and O's with the yo-yo strategy. It's more simple: A player sits for two games or so, returns to the lineup, releases all his pent-up energy - and possibly, frustration - and helps his team win. The latest player to follow this plan, Willie Green, was the catalyst in the Sixers' rally from an 18-point deficit to a 110-102 victory Tuesday night over the Denver Nuggets.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A professional yo-yo man hit Burlington County this weekend with the single goal of broadening the minds of youths. "Most kids can do just three tricks," said Tim Redmond, a 24-year-old performer who takes yo-yoing seriously. "They know the 'Sleeper,' 'Walk the Dog,' and 'Rock the Baby.' But there are over 150 tricks to learn. " In a turned-back black beret, a white shirt, black pants, and a single nylon glove designed for pool players, the Pennsylvania native resembled a mime, except he shot double-fisted yo-yos into the air at speeds only a pro could be comfortable with.
NEWS
October 5, 2004
I am writing in response to an article by Mitch Lipka that appeared in your online publication Sept. 27 regarding New Jersey's proposed state ban on the Yo Yo Waterball. I applaud New Jersey for taking action on this important child-safety issue! I am the Chicago mother who started a grassroots campaign in 2003 to get the Yo Yo Waterball banned for sale in the United States after my then-5-year-old son, Andrew, was nearly strangled by the cord of the toy. It was I who contacted Tina Schreffler after reading an article about her in your publication last year.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Melissa King, the Chinese cultural camp she is attending this week is not so much about learning the Chinese culture as it is about ordering properly. The 10-year-old from Washington Township said she has been waiting to order by herself at a Chinese restaurant since she was really young. "My parents always ordered for me because I didn't know Chinese," Melissa said. "I hope this week will teach me to order by myself. " Language lessons are only part of South Jersey's first Chinese Cultural Camp, a week-long day camp at Voorhees Middle School designed to teach children such as Melissa about their heritage and identity.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a truism in the toy world that what goes up must come down. Cabbage Patch Kids? Gone to seed. The pet rock? Sunk. Beanie Babies? Soft. The hula hoop? Don't get around much anymore. The yo-yo, though, defies all the logic about toy fads. Over the last seven decades, the humble toy has been up and down more than an Imperial in the hands of a 10-year-old on a full-blown sugar rush. Today, the yo-yo's yo-yo effect is at work again. The fad has come around. That burst of color on schoolyards and in backyards is not the autumn leaves but yo-yos on the ends of strings.
NEWS
March 9, 1998 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
His "sleeper" was hypnotic. He "walked the dog" without a mess. He performed the "loop the loop," "around the world," and "rock the baby" flawlessly. But Eric Simon, 14, really impressed the judge of the yo-yo contest held Saturday at the Hardware & Toy Center with his dexterous ability to make the toy climb up the string like a spider on silk. Simon, an eighth grader at General Wayne Middle School, has mastered the science and art of the yo-yo. With his black Terminator, he sketched vectors in the air, rounded out curves with the flick of a wrist, sending the toy out in all directions only to come back, like a gopher scurrying home, to the palm of his hand.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | by Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
Steve Brown has had a lot of ups and downs during his short professional career. And he hopes that never changes. The 24-year old Brown, you see, is a professional yo-yo player. For a toy whose image is changing with the times, Brown is the perfect salesman. Armed with a colorful mohawk hairdo, Drew Carey-like glasses, "yo-yo man" tatoo and a steel briefcase full of yo-yo's, Brown is currently touring the country to help promote Duncan's new line of yo-yo's titled the Hardcore Series.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2014
KNOW WHAT you need in August ahead of the heart of the gubernatorial race? Substantive jobs data showing that Tom Corbett and Tom Wolf both fudge numbers. And, yeah, it's shocking to think that pols use stats solely to their advantage. And I realize efforts to claw toward the truth of complex issues can lose readers. Plus there are lots of stats. But here goes. Let's talk job growth. And although top economists suggest that the best jobs measure is long-term net jobs, let's start with just private-sector growth.
SPORTS
January 17, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE CEMETERY in Southwest Philadelphia is an abandoned, tumbledown ruin, overgrown in many places, gravestones knocked on their sides. To attempt to find a grave there, amid tens of thousands of graves, would have been impossible without the help of the Friends of Mount Moriah Cemetery, a volunteer group working to preserve and restore the property. The email was answered within a day or so. Harry Shifren's grave is in Section K, Range 29, Lot 41. With a map, it took only a few minutes to find.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
For George Horner at age 19, music was an escape from the pain that surrounded him and his family in the Czechoslovakian concentration camp where they were imprisoned. Horner's passion for music endured through several near-misses with death, the loss of his family, and through the end of World War II. Later this month Horner, now 90, a retired physician and a resident of Newtown Square, will commemorate the lives lost in the Holocaust by performing on piano at Boston Symphony Hall alongside legendary cellist Yo-Yo Ma. The Oct. 22 performance was arranged by Mark Ludwig, the head of the Terezin Music Foundation, a Boston nonprofit group that honors the legacy of composers who died in the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The numerous far-flung elements of Yo-Yo Ma's musical existence might not have been expected to come together, but come together they have. The cellist - who plays many standard concertos, premieres a new one every season or so, and seems never to have met a musical ethnicity he doesn't like - brings his genre-blurring Silk Road Ensemble to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts on Wednesday, with names that also turn up at his orchestral concerts....
NEWS
July 2, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The weather wasn't even sticky. Pardon my incredulity, but after observing the Philadelphia Orchestra and its soloists struggling against elements from summer heat to concession-stand noise, it's hard not to pinch yourself at a near-ideal opening night at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, and one that unfolded as if it were typical. None of the "usuallys" and "sometimeses" were apparent: Though some of the near-capacity crowd that turned out to hear the orchestra and star cellist Yo-Yo Ma (and caused significant traffic jams)
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though few classical musicians have such assured superstar status, cellist Yo-Yo Ma played as though he had much to prove Tuesday at the Kimmel Center. Or maybe it just seemed that way because we're used to seeing stars become lazy. Maybe Ma wanted to make the most of collaborating with a pianist as substantial as Kathryn Stott. Whatever. The length and scope of his recital went beyond the call of duty. And he reasserted himself in the forefront of living cellists. Ma has sometimes been guilty of playing more from his intellect than his instincts, with contrived, mannered results.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
To admire cellist Yo-Yo Ma is to wish he'd return more frequently to music he's done before. Not all the time, just often enough to let you better absorb his multi-genre, pan-ethnic adventures, the spirit of which is best summed up by his latest album title, New Impossibilities. Sure, Ma, now 52, often programs Strauss' oft-heard Don Quixote: That's the one he plays, seemingly as a consolation, when also premiering something new that audiences might not love. It's those new works that warrant repeated visits, plus recordings.
NEWS
August 12, 2007
This summer, the Great Expectations civic dialogue project, a joint effort of the University of Pennsylvania and The Inquirer, asked citizens of the region to imagine that the next mayor of Philadelphia was sitting at their kitchen table, giving them undivided attention for five minutes. How would they complete this sentence: "Yo, Al (or Mike) the one thing I really need you to do is . . . " More than 600 essays have rolled in; they're still arriving. They can be read at www.greatexpectations07.
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