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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2010
BALANCE - USE it or lose it. I found this out personally when I added yoga back into my overall fitness regimen. In fact, I was quite frankly shocked when I went to do the tree pose on the left side and could not maintain it. I was, literally, out of balance. That was a wake-up call for me. Just a few years before, I could do this effortlessly. But, letting yoga go by the wayside, I was now paying for my neglect of balance. Luckily, with practice I was able to improve my balance and can hold the tree posture again.
SPORTS
January 25, 2012 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's next for these 76ers? Chamomile tea breaks at noon? Well, if the results are similar to what they're getting from yoga sessions, why not? One day after beating the Washington Wizards for the third time this season (the fifth if you count the two preseason victories), Sixers coach Doug Collins felt comfortable enough to chat briefly with the team, and then leave them to stretch and work out the kinks in their bodies under the watchful eye of a yoga instructor rather than run a practice.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
The fitness troika today is mind, body and spirit. You can't truly be fit in one area, if you are a sloth in the others. Or so advocates - many of them members of the scientific community - claim, backed by hefty research. Fitness trends reflect this growing respect for the M-B-S connection, so if you want to get with it in the New Year, look eastward toward the ancient, snf in some circles recently modernized, practice of yoga. Let's start with the '90s interpretation taught at the Baron Baptiste Power Yoga Institute in Bryn Mawr.
SPORTS
January 18, 2012 | BY BOB COONEY, cooneyb@phillynews.com
THE INJURIES are starting to pile up for the 76ers. Yesterday at the team's practice at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, coach Doug Collins brought in a yoga expert so his club could work out some of the kinks it has collected during the blitz of an early season that has had them play nine games in 13 days. Gimping around the practice facility were Evan Turner (thigh contusion) and Spencer Hawes (Achilles' strain). Hawes has also been struggling with a strained back recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012
DO IT RIGHT This is a variation of the marichyasana ("ray of light") yoga pose, which massages the abdominal organs, stretches the shoulders and strengthens the spine. (Not recommended for those with spinal injuries, or high or low blood pressure.) Sit on the floor or yoga mat with your legs extended in front of you. Bend your knees (Indian-style) with both shins inward and left leg in front. Keeping your left leg bent, reposition the leg so that the left foot is flat on the floor.
TRAVEL
January 20, 2014 | By D.A. Gleason, For The Inquirer
On June 21, I boarded Train No. 650 at 30th Street Station for a first-day-of-summer yoga escape. Destined for a pristine beach oozing tranquillity? An isolated mountaintop exuding transcendence? More like an island - the one immortalized as the city that never sleeps. I was Manhattan-bound; though not to a hip yoga studio, but to the hubbub of Times Square. An estimated 15,000 other yogis and yoginis and I were participating in Mind Over Madness, all-day outdoor yoga sessions at the "Crossroads of the World" - and a fund-raiser for the yoga-inspired charities Bent on Learning and Urban Zen. I arrived in the Big Apple in the afternoon, made my way to Times Square Pedestrian Plaza, checked in with a T-shirted event attendant, squeezed into a tight spot, unrolled my mat, and got ready to Zen out during NYC's Friday-evening rush hour amid wailing sirens, honking horns, accents familiar and not, crystal-clear images flashing frenetically from mammoth video screens, vendors hawking $20 "Rolexes," stilt-walking Lady Libertys, a man in a wheelchair holding a cardboard sign scribbled with his honest plea for "spare change for beer and pizza," and a frenzy of more sights and sounds.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | By Jacob Quinn Sanders, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jonathan Labman has managed a New York art gallery and studied to become a Presbyterian minister. He has been an actor and a masseur. All the while, Labman, 45, has tried healing: first himself, then others. Labman grew up in Yardley, attending public school until he felt forced to leave Pennsbury High School after the 10th grade, in 1971. He finished at a private school in Wales on a scholarship for which he applied. He recalls walking the halls of Pennsbury and hearing students call him "fairy" and "mama's boy. " "I didn't know what homosexuality was at the time," Labman said.
NEWS
December 8, 2003 | By Thomas Belton
A few weeks ago, my teenage daughter surprised me on the back porch as I performed my "downward-facing dog" yoga position. This involves sticking my derriere straight up in the air as I push off the floor on all fours. Astonished, she shouted, "Mom, make him stop. That's just wrong," then fled back into the house. Now, I'm no Age of Aquarius, Hare Krishna-singing devotee of mystical renewal, just an aging father seeking more elasticity in a spine that has shrunk under the weight of too many moons.
SPORTS
February 22, 2004 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Juan Cave broke a 19-year-old record using a 5,000-year-old training technique. Warming up with yoga exercises, the St. Joseph's Prep junior flew 6 feet, 10 inches to win the high jump yesterday at Lehigh University's Rauch Fieldhouse. It was the only meet record at the 39th annual Track and Field Coaches Association of Greater Philadelphia Meet of Champions. The old mark, 6-9 1/2, was set by Plymouth Whitemarsh's Tyrone Smith in 1985. "I was able to focus," said Cave, who made two strong attempts at 7 feet.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE PHILADELPHIA Folk Festival last weekend wasn't the same without Dante Bucci. Dante, who died last Wednesday, had been taking his unique way of making music to the festival since 2001. His instrument was the "hang," a kind of drum in the shape of a flying saucer, balanced on the lap and played with hands and fingers. The music Dante produced with this odd device, much of it of his own composition, was unlike anything heard from traditional instruments. Its sound is usually described as "dreamlike" and "haunting.
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NEWS
March 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Perhaps the 30,000 e-mails Hillary Clinton unilaterally consigned to electronic oblivion contained nothing more pertinent to the national interest than the then-secretary of state's yoga routine. And no one is going to the mat over whether the presidential hopeful and her swami typed sideways smiley faces while discussing the downward dog pose. The trouble is that Clinton's use of a private e-mail account ensured that the sole arbiter of her communications' public relevance was Clinton herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015
WHEN DID yoga pants become nam-nasty? For years now, school administrators nationwide have banned middle- and high-school students from wearing yoga pants and leggings, calling them distracting to male students. But now the negative tongue-clucking about the ubiquitous bottoms has shifted from teeny boppers onto adult women. This latest round started in earnest in January after an online post by a Christian blogger about her decision to no longer wear yoga pants went viral.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Unflappable and unstoppable in her neon green tank top, Lisa Duffy takes down all 20 Collingswood High School varsity wrestlers at once. The amiably unruly crew of teenagers at Anjali Power Yoga in Westmont is suddenly at her command. "Crank it up!" she says, or rather, shouts, striding through the sweaty rows of mats. "This is fun, right? We're here to sweat, right?" During the team's one-hour weekly hot yoga session, the studio heats up to 93 degrees, the soundtrack thump-thump-thumps with party tunes, and shirtless, noisy boys try to bust on each other.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Alene Brennan kept a revolutionary New Year's resolution: to create the career of her dreams. "I made my decision on Jan. 2, 2014," recalls the Mount Laurel resident, 35, who had been a corporate communications professional for a dozen years. "I gave my notice and put my house on the market. I quit, sold, and enrolled at the Natural Gourmet Institute in Manhattan. I found an apartment in Union Square and lived there for six months. " The 2002 Rowan University graduate, health coach, yoga teacher, and freshly certified natural gourmet chef returned to South Jersey last summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The Philadelphia Marathon is the official start of the cold-weather running season, so in honor of the Olympian efforts sure to be on display next Sunday, we turn our attention to bold running/yoga tights - because at Mile 23, a little floral action goes a long way in lifting both spirits and legs. The trendlet Whether looping Kelly Drive or repeating squats ad nauseam at the neighborhood barre studio, you'll be sure to see your fair share of colorful and color-blocked running and yoga tights.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE PHILADELPHIA Folk Festival last weekend wasn't the same without Dante Bucci. Dante, who died last Wednesday, had been taking his unique way of making music to the festival since 2001. His instrument was the "hang," a kind of drum in the shape of a flying saucer, balanced on the lap and played with hands and fingers. The music Dante produced with this odd device, much of it of his own composition, was unlike anything heard from traditional instruments. Its sound is usually described as "dreamlike" and "haunting.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014
NO DOUBT you have already heard that first lady Michelle Obama turned 50 last month - but did you hear that she was going to change her workout and do less weight training and cardio and do more yoga? "I'm seeing myself shift from weight-bearing stuff . . . and the heavy cardio and running, to things like yoga that will keep me flexible," she told People magazine in an interview last month. Hold up, Mrs. Obama: While yoga offers a variety of complements, including improving flexibility, yoga should not be seen as a replacement for strength training.
TRAVEL
January 20, 2014 | By D.A. Gleason, For The Inquirer
On June 21, I boarded Train No. 650 at 30th Street Station for a first-day-of-summer yoga escape. Destined for a pristine beach oozing tranquillity? An isolated mountaintop exuding transcendence? More like an island - the one immortalized as the city that never sleeps. I was Manhattan-bound; though not to a hip yoga studio, but to the hubbub of Times Square. An estimated 15,000 other yogis and yoginis and I were participating in Mind Over Madness, all-day outdoor yoga sessions at the "Crossroads of the World" - and a fund-raiser for the yoga-inspired charities Bent on Learning and Urban Zen. I arrived in the Big Apple in the afternoon, made my way to Times Square Pedestrian Plaza, checked in with a T-shirted event attendant, squeezed into a tight spot, unrolled my mat, and got ready to Zen out during NYC's Friday-evening rush hour amid wailing sirens, honking horns, accents familiar and not, crystal-clear images flashing frenetically from mammoth video screens, vendors hawking $20 "Rolexes," stilt-walking Lady Libertys, a man in a wheelchair holding a cardboard sign scribbled with his honest plea for "spare change for beer and pizza," and a frenzy of more sights and sounds.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a perfect November Saturday afternoon when they could have been pumping iron at the gym or hanging out with friends over a couple of pale ales, half a dozen men slipped through the back entrance to a spartan yoga studio on the main drag of Westmont in Camden County. They were there, bravely and voluntarily, to spend two hours doing yoga. Never mind that the ancient Indian practice linking breath, body, and spirit was developed and taught by men. In America, yoga is a woman's domain.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013
CELEBRATED, controversial physician, alternative-medicine advocate and new-age guru Dr. Deepak Chopra says that he has found a solution to achieve not only permanent weight loss but heightened well-being and a newfound lightness of the soul. He shares his insights in the new book What Are You Hungry For? which he will discuss Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the Central Branch of the Free Library, and in a PBS TV special airing at 8 p.m. Dec. 4 on WHYY12. Chopra, 66, is a study in opposites that attract.
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