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Yogurt

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FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In all of the excitement of planning for the Big Meal, it's easy to forget that there's a houseful of people - visiting relatives, home-from-college kids, and assorted other hangers-on - expecting to be fed on the days leading up to and after the holiday. Stocking the pantry and freezer with these guests in mind can avert those last-minute scrambles to get something on the table. One of the challenges of feeding family and friends during the holiday season is knowing how to walk the line between celebratory and indulgent.
FOOD
September 5, 1990 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
BREYER'S LOWFAT FROZEN YOGURT. Vanilla, chocolate, black cherry, strawberry, strawberry-banana, red raspberry and peach. $3.69 to $4.29 per half-gallon container. BONNIE: Breyer's frozen yogurt is a premium product, made without vegetable gums or stabilizers. Instead, Breyer's adds pectin and egg yolks to keep the yogurt smooth and free from ice crystals. Pectin is a thickener, naturally found in fruits. Since Breyer's adds just a tad of egg yolk, each half-cup serving contains only 10 milligrams of cholesterol (15 in the vanilla)
NEWS
March 10, 1986 | By Laurie Merrill, Special to The Inquirer
An application by a yogurt manufacturer for a special exception has been approved, allowing the storage of the product in the Huntingdon Valley Industrial Center. The Lower Moreland Zoning Hearing Board voted 2-0 Thursday to allow Colombo Inc., which is based in Massachusetts, to use 1,800 square feet of a 10,000- square-foot building for warehouse space. The remainder of the building at 1647 Republic Rd. is used by Plasti-Seal Corp. Most of the section of the building to be leased by Colombo would be refrigerated, according to Russell Mackey, a Columbo representative who attended the meeting.
FOOD
May 8, 1991 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Yogurt as a cholesterol fighter? Some brands of yogurt have live lactobacillus acidophilus cultures (read the label!). Current research suggests that some strains of lactobacillus acidophilus assimilate cholesterol in the digestive tract before it can be absorbed into the body. Yogurt has lots more going for it: It has the lean protein of milk and even more calcium (in fact, 38 percent more!). And its enzymes digest some of milk's lactose, so that many people who can't tolerate milk can have yogurt.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Edwin Crotty makes sense. He paves the driveways of his prison farms with prune pits from a juice factory that otherwise would spend $50,000 a year to dump them in a landfill. He uses newspapers instead of straw under the cows in the barn, then re- recycles them out on his fields, where they quickly disintegrate. And he does what he calls "double cropping" with the workers he supervises, inmates at the Skillman Dairy Farm. At the only yogurt farm in the country run by a state institution, 50 resident inmates help produce food for New Jersey's prisoners and mental health patients while they also gain valuable attitudes toward work, Crotty said during a recent tour.
NEWS
November 24, 1986 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some years ago, a series of American television commercials linked yogurt with longevity. Featured were the long-living (and, presumably, yogurt-loving) citizens of the Soviet Republic of Armenia. The Armenians are believed to be among the most ancient peoples in the world. The name of the republic's capital, Erevan, is said to derive from an Armenian word meaning "it appears," which Noah supposedly shouted after he first saw land after the flood, before he landed on Mount Ararat.
FOOD
August 5, 1992 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Ben & Jerry's Low Fat Frozen Yogurt. Blueberry cheesecake, banana strawberry, raspberry, coffee almond fudge, Heath Bar crunch, chocolate, chocolate fudge brownie, and cherry Garcia. $2.59 per pint. Bonnie: Once Haagen-Dazs introduced its line of frozen yogurt, it was just a matter of time before rival Ben & Jerry's introduced one. Like Haagen-Dazs', each of the Ben & Jerry's yogurts (except Heath Bar) contains only natural ingredients and is quite delicious. A 4-ounce serving of Ben & Jerry's Frozen Yogurt ranges from a low of about 160 calories and 2 grams fat for the blueberry cheesecake to a high of 210 calories and 7 grams fat for the coffee almond fudge.
FOOD
June 21, 2007
We like this flavorful new line of all-natural, lowfat yogurts with added omega-3 DHA and something called NutraFlora, a soluble fiber to aid digestion and enhance the absorption of calcium. Among the flavors: Cherry Black Currant, Mango Pineapple Passion Fruit, and Pomegranate Blueberry, our fave. Comfort classics These cards hold recipes from the 1950 edition of Betty Crocker's Picture Cook Book , published before that name became known for packaged ingredients. So there are recipes for a flaky pie crust, fluffy meat loaf, even devil's food cake and chocolate butter icing - from scratch . Jumpin' java These new coffee sodas actually taste like coffee.
NEWS
January 14, 1989 | By John Way Jennings and Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writers
Investigators won a court order yesterday to obtain fingerprints from Thomas Lee, the 17-year-old Haddonfield youth who is comatose from eating cyanide-laced yogurt, for comparison with fingerprints found on evidence. A Superior Court judge yesterday approved the request by the Camden County Prosecutor's Office to fingerprint Lee in his hospital bed. Officials have said they are investigating suicide as one explanation for the cyanide poisoning. Dennis Wixted, first assistant Camden County prosecutor, said during a brief hearing before Judge A. Donald Bigley that Lee's fingerprints were needed so that they could be compared with those found on pieces of evidence collected during the investigation.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | By Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Two FBI agents fingerprinted a comatose Haddonfield teen-ager who is clinging to life after eating cyanide-laced yogurt two weeks ago, Camden County Prosecutor Samuel Asbell said yesterday. Asbell said fingerprints also will be taken from friends and family of Thomas Lee, 17, who is in critical condition at West Jersey Hospital-Voorhees. Rutgers University-Camden associates of Lee's father, Hsin-Yi Lee, also will be fingerprinted. The prints will be compared with those found on items seized from the Lees' Haddonfield home and the elder Lee's Rutgers laboratory.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 18, 2016
Makes 2 servings 1 cup plain whole-milk yogurt 1 cup ice 11/2 teaspoons powdered matcha (see note) 1 pitted date, chopped (see note) 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract Pinch kosher salt 1. Combine the yogurt, ice, matcha, date, vanilla extract, and salt in a blender, preferably an ice-crushing (high-powered) model. Puree until smooth. 2. Pour into a tall glass and serve right away. - From Cheryl Sternman Rule, author of Yogurt Culture: A Global Look at How to Make, Bake, Sip and Chill the World's Creamiest Food (Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015)
FOOD
August 18, 2016
Makes 4 appetizer or 2 entree servings 1/4 cup olive oil Salt and pepper 1 eggplant, split in half lengthwise 1 small summer squash, sliced into rounds or small cubes 11/2 cups plain thick yogurt (such as Greek or labne) 2/3 cup chopped fresh herbs (any mixture of chives, mint, tarragon, parsley) 1 small clove of garlic, peeled and minced 1 large tomato, cored and cubed (reserve juices) 1/4 cup walnut halves or pieces, toasted Sprigs of parsley or mint, optional   1. Heat oven to 500 degrees.
NEWS
June 12, 2016
Makes 2 servings 1 cup Greek yogurt 2/3 cup of your favorite granola 1 teaspoon honey or maple syrup 6 strawberries, sliced 1 medium apple, cored and sliced 1/2 cup blueberries   1. Stir the honey or syrup into the yogurt, and divide evenly onto the bottoms of two flat bowls. 2. Top with granola (in a dog shape using a cookie cutter as a template). 3. Arrange the strawberries (red), apple slices (white), and blueberries (blue)
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
"Where is the yogurt?" That's what a Texas judge asked last year after Whole Foods was slapped with a class-action lawsuit alleging that its store-brand Greek yogurt in 11 states - including Pennsylvania and New Jersey - contained nearly six times the sugar listed on the label. The health-conscious grocer assured U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks at a June 2015 conference that samples of the yogurt had been retained for testing. Except that might not have been true. Which could be a problem.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'Do you eat breakfast before school in the morning?" I asked the fifth graders at Wiggins Prep Elementary School in Camden. "No," said Aa'myrah Bethea, 10. "I get up and put my uniform on, then I get back in bed till my mom calls me. " Aa'myrah, who prefers to be called Coco, is not unlike many kids her age who would gladly skip breakfast for a few more minutes of sleep. So on the first of eight weeks of classes teaching kids how to prepare simple, delicious, healthy meals, breakfast was Lesson One. This fall, we are cooking at the well-used kitchen of Baptist Temple Church, the 98-year-old stone stalwart on South Fourth Street in Camden across from the public school, where there was no kitchen option.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY SARAH GISH, The Kansas City Star
EVERY NIGHT before bed, Sue Patterson packs her 10-year-old daughter, Emmy, a lunch that resembles a work of art. Picture a heart-shaped roast-beef sandwich nestled into a Hello Kitty container, with colorful cups of dried fruit, olives, organic cheese and yogurt-covered pretzels. Or a pink Japanese-style bento box with a California sushi roll, shelled edamame, red grapes and kiwis cut into cute fan shapes. Patterson's a big believer in eating healthy, organic food, so spending 15 to 20 minutes preparing her daughter's lunch is "totally worth it so she can have a good, high-quality lunch every day. " But a lunch doesn't have to be Pinterest-worthy to be healthy and fun. It just takes a little planning and a stock of convenient, kid-approved foods.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
JOSEPH OSEFCHEN knew something was up when he noticed a "gap" on the yogurt shelf at the Whole Foods in Marlton, N.J. His law firm is suing the grocer over the sugar content of its 365 Everyday Value Plain Greek Yogurt. But, last week, that particular yogurt suddenly disappeared. "There's a frigging 2-foot hole in the dairy case," Osefchen said. You remember the 18-minute "gap" in the Nixon White House tapes, right? Osefchen also went to the Whole Foods in Cherry Hill and on South Street.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MAYBE IT was just an innocent mistake in the food-testing lab. Or maybe it's a big, fat Greek yogurt conspiracy designed to give the health-conscious grocer Whole Foods the edge in an ultracompetitive market. Don't worry, though. This is nothing that a couple of class-action lawsuits can't fix. Yesterday, the lawyers who made headlines for suing Subway over the length of its so-called footlong sandwiches filed a lawsuit in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court claiming that Whole Foods is selling Greek yogurt with nearly six times the sugar listed on the label.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2014
HALLELUJAH! Fat is back! You'll be happy to know that after years of choking down the banal, tasteless, Styrofoam-like fat-free snacks, desserts and those absolutely awful fat-free dressings, some new research says that full-fat milk, butter and cream are less likely to make you obese. I know, it's a real head-scratcher and sounds counterintuitive, right? But, according to two recently released reports from Europe, the prevailing assumptions about fat just don't support the facts.
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