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Young Adults

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NEWS
September 22, 2011 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - At least one part of President Obama's health-care overhaul has proven popular. With the economy sputtering, the number of young adults covered by health insurance grew by about a million as families flocked to take advantage of a new benefit in the law. Two surveys released Wednesday - one by the government, another by Gallup - found significantly fewer young adults going without coverage even as the overall number of uninsured remained...
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Theology on Tap" is the title of a series for young adults to be held from 7 to 9 p.m. July 16, 23 and 30 at SS. Simon and Jude Church, West Chester Pike and Route 352, West Chester. The programs will include discussions on decision making, problems in society today, and methods of healing and understanding. For more information, call the Office of Young Adult Ministry at 610-649-9476. MARRIAGE SEMINAR Marketplace Community Church, 500 Chesterbrook Blvd., Wayne, will host "Marriage Menders" from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 12. It will be led by Tom Whiteman of Life Counseling and New Life Clinics.
NEWS
February 18, 1994 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If adulthood in the '90s came with Cliff Notes, we'd read that: "Melrose Place" is a really good show. An HIV test is a rite of passage. The Big Gulp was the most profound invention of our generation. Or so we're informed in "Reality Bites," Hollywood's latest and most on- target effort at addressing the anxieties and concerns of the post-Baby Boomer generation. It's as tempting as a Slurpee with a side of Pop Rocks to assume "Reality Bites" is just capitalizing on the demographic tagged "Generation X" and the twentysomethings.
NEWS
March 24, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Communications major Daniel Quick was too busy at Temple University yesterday to watch President Obama sign sweeping health-care legislation into law. But he had been following the news about one key provision - the possibility of obtaining health insurance through his parents' health plans after he graduates next year. "It's encouraging to me," said Quick, a junior. "That was the major thing I was worried about, even more than rent and food, after I graduated from college.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writers
With a degree in economics, Yevgeniy Levich, 23, may understand better than most why so many people his age are out of work. He blames the lack of jobs on a myriad of reasons: the lack of regulation in banking that led to this economic crisis; a failed theory that lowering taxes leads to investment; a proposal for infrastructure jobs that doesn't do much for someone who doesn't work with his hands - that's all the macro stuff. Microeconomics is this: Levich, a Central High School graduate with degrees in economics and journalism from New York University, is still living with his parents in Northeast Philadelphia and hoping that he'll land a job as a nightclub office assistant.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | By Russell Cooke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new jobs program will offer 1,000 disadvantaged young adults from Philadelphia up to a year of intensive physical work and daily educational instruction, city job-training officials announced yesterday. Modeled after similar programs in San Francisco and New York, the new Philadelphia Youth Service Corps will enroll unemployed individuals - many of them high school dropouts - between the ages of 18 and 22. Participants will be paid minimum wage and work in 10-member teams, doing such things as painting community centers, renovating houses, clearing vacant lots, and working as aides in homeless shelters and nursing homes, according to David W. Lacey, president of the Private Industry Council of Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE SURGE IN young adults that's fueled an increase in the city's population in recent years is a "fragile boom," a new Pew Charitable Trusts report says. In a Pew poll, "half of the 20- to 34-year-olds questioned said they definitely or probably would not be living in Philadelphia five to 10 years from now, compared with about three in 10 for the rest of the city's adult population," Larry Eichel, project director of Pew's Philadelphia Research Initiative, wrote in the report, released yesterday.
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Eric Jackman, ST. JOSEPH'S PREPARATORY SCHOOL
Young adults were a key demographic that helped to elect President Obama in 2008. Polling data show that 66 percent of people under 30 voted for Obama, the highest share of the youth vote obtained by any candidate since exit polls began reporting results by age. One of the top provisions of the Affordable Care Act, which was passed last year, was to make health insurance more affordable to the millions of Americans who cannot afford it. For...
NEWS
October 24, 2011
THERE ARE more than 27 million American men and women ages 18-24 with a Facebook account. That's 27 million voices that share their insights and opinions on the Web. If our youth are willing to display their opinion on a social-networking site, imagine the impact if they brought their voice to the voting booth. Unfortunately, we cannot simply "like" a candidate. We have to cast a vote. Only 22 percent - or 10.8 million - American voters ages 18 to 24 went to the polls during the 2006 congressional election.
NEWS
February 8, 1986 | BY JIM WRIGHT, From the New York Times
The beer commercial "you can have it all" sounds like a kind of anthem for America's young, prosperous, upwardly mobile professionals who are supposed to typify their generation. Unfortunately, the myth hides an ugly fact. Most of America's young adults are not upwardly mobile. For as long as anyone can remember, the heart of the American experience has been upward mobility. What we now see is something alien and unacceptable: a general downward mobility, a slippage in living standards from parents to children.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Rick Barrett, MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINAL
Harley-Davidson loves millennials, no doubt about it, with much of the company's marketing aimed at motorcycle buyers ages 18 to 34. Do the millennials love Harley back? It looks that way, as the world's largest manufacturer of heavyweight bikes says it's the market leader in sales of new on-road motorcycles to young adults. In 2015, for the eighth straight year, Harley was the No. 1 seller of new highway motorcycles in the United States to adults ages 18 to 34. It was also the top seller of those bikes to women, African Americans, and Hispanics, as well as Caucasian men ages 35-plus, according to motorcycle registration data.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016
Question: My kids are 30, 28, and 25. All of them are out of college and on their own. We paid their tuitions, but room and board was on them, so they had some student loans. My oldest son got married two years ago, and his wife's family is helping them out a lot, even though both have professional jobs. When her grandmother died, her parents paid off all their student loans. They also handed down an almost brand-new car because nobody else in the family wanted it. He just told me they are all taking a weeklong vacation out of the country next Christmas, hosted by his in-laws.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
After years of chronicling the dismal outcomes for people with autism who have grown too old for school-based services, Paul Shattuck grew frustrated at how slowly things were changing. The Drexel University researcher approached leaders at the school about a more active approach. This week, Drexel announced that it had received an anonymous $3.5 million donation from a family foundation to develop and evaluate ways to help young people with autism transition into the adult world of work or college.
NEWS
December 26, 2015
By Paul F. Morrissey On Christmas Eve, my brothers and sisters and I would sing, "Tomorrow will be Christmas, and we will carols sing; So early in the morning, the sweet church bells will ring. . . " No one ever sings that carol now, but it is still in my memory from more than 60 years ago. It was the 1950s, and the earliest Mass then was at 5 a.m. I was a choirboy, and as I hustled across the street in the frosty morning air with the red cassock, starched white surplice, thick celluloid collar, and the crimson silk ribbon bow tie, I stole a glance upward at the stars as the church bells rang.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A photography exhibit opening in Camden this weekend asks viewers to take a closer look at the city's young adults. The show, "Look Again: The Young People of CASA," will be displayed in a theater at the BB&T Pavilion (formerly the Susquehanna Bank Center) on the waterfront Friday and Saturday. It features portraits of and personal essays by 37 teenagers and young adults who are part of Camden Adolescents Striving for Achievement, a North Camden after-school program that focuses on tutoring and college preparation.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania leads the nation - and New Jersey is fourth - in drug overdose deaths among young adult men, according to a new analysis, raising the level of urgency about an epidemic that over the last decade has killed more than twice as many Americans as homicide. Bucks and Gloucester Counties led their respective states in overdose fatality rates among males ages 19 to 25 - each of them nearly three times Philadelphia's rate. In the eight-county region, more than 100 young men a year are dying from overdoses of both illicit and legal drugs.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elaine Catherine Pierson Mastroianni, 89, of Bryn Mawr, a physician and the author of Sex Is Never an Emergency , a sexual-health guide for young adults, died Saturday, Oct. 3, of lung cancer at home. Dr. Pierson's slim paperback appeared on campuses a decade before Dr. Ruth Westheimer suggested a frank approach to human sexuality, and three years before Our Bodies, Ourselves , a landmark book on sex, was released. "My primary objective of this little book is to prevent unwanted pregnancies and, secondarily, to help students be more comfortable with their level of sexuality, whatever that level is," she wrote.
NEWS
September 24, 2015
PEOPLE ARE always trying to find the secret to financial success. But I'd like to address the young folks who ask me how to get rich. If you're young, you have something we older folks will never have as much of: time. It's an advantage you shouldn't waste. Start saving in your 20s, and you'll have time for your money to grow. You'll have time to enjoy the fruits of compound interest. You'll have time to weather stock-market volatility. The earlier you start saving, the less you'll have to save over time.
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
THERE IS A METHOD to what some readers consider my madness. Some people hate that I hate debt. Others disagree when I encourage families not to borrow for college. And, man, do I get a lot of email when I recommend that college students, especially freshmen, not have credit cards. I value this feedback, so I created the Color of Money "Talk Back" feature, in which folks provide counterarguments to something I've written. "I disagree with the idea that credit cards aren't important for college students," wrote Sallie of Freeport, Maine.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | MICHELLE SINGLETARY, WASHINGTON POST WRITERS GROUP
I GOT THE reaction I expected from my daughter when I suggested that for graduate school, to save money, she live at home. She shuddered. I understand her reservation. But for her greater good, my recommendation makes more financial sense. My husband and I have enough saved to pay for her undergraduate studies at the University of Maryland, including room and board. And because we saved, we were OK with her living on campus even though we live only about a half-hour away.
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