CollectionsYoung Lawyers
IN THE NEWS

Young Lawyers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 5, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
It appears that the death of "Big Law," so widely predicted a few years ago, has been greatly exaggerated. After a breathtaking pullback following the recession of 2008 and 2009, hiring at large law firms in Philadelphia and around the nation has revived. Large classes of first-year lawyers are arriving this week and next at many local firms, and while the numbers are not as high as they were before the financial crisis, some law-firm leaders have begun to talk of staff shortages and juggling legal personnel to meet surging client demand.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2010 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 8 a.m., and lawyer Cecilia Isaacs-Blundin, crisply attired in a pin-striped suit and trailing a large roll-around briefcase, strides into her office, which on this day happens to be a jail in the fortresslike 25th District police headquarters in North Philadelphia. Her clients are not the big commercial companies she typically represents as a lawyer in Ballard Spahr L.L.P.'s white-collar defense practice. Rather, they are standard-issue criminal defendants, accused of a smorgasbord of street offenses including drug possession, dealing, and assault.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2009 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Koller is a bright, hyperkinetic 31-year-old lawyer who has spent the last seven years working his way up, moving from one firm to another in search of more challenging work and higher salaries to pay down his huge law school loans. His progress on that path came to an abrupt halt March 2. That is when the vicious downsizing rolling through the legal industry caught up with him. Just three months after receiving a glowing performance review, he was called into the office of the managing partner of Riper Riley Hollin & Colagreco, a politically prominent Chester County firm where he had worked since September 2007, and fired.
NEWS
January 6, 2008 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Law school is intense. Students cram their heads with torts, contracts, and criminal and civil procedure. They face grueling exams - the most daunting after graduation. But then, presumably, newly minted lawyers are ready for whatever comes next: a judicial clerkship, a job at a firm, service as prosecutors or public defenders. Except the switch from law student to lawyer isn't always easy. So the Burlington County Bar Association's Young Lawyer Committee has launched a symposium, "Bridging the Gap: Making the Transition From Law Student to Lawyer," to offer tips and hints from the pros.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2009 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John F. Smith III is a senior litigator at Reed Smith L.L.P., of Philadelphia, who served for 11 years on the firm's executive committee and now, in addition to representing clients, is deeply involved in programs aimed at sharpening the business-development skills of young lawyers. Law firms for years had given such training short shrift, relying on a relative handful of relationship partners to generate work. Younger associates typically had little idea where the work came from, or what firms had to do to get it. Smith, who serves on the boards of a number of locally prominent institutions, says he is trying to change that by showing younger lawyers more of the business side of the law firm.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a lengthy drought, real estate lawyers are a hot commodity again. The biggest firms in Philadelphia and other cities with booming real estate markets say finding lawyers skilled in handling the zoning, tax, and transactional pieces of complex projects has become a near impossibility. There simply aren't enough lawyers to go around, and that has stretched existing practice groups and forced firms to move lawyers internally from other specialties. " Voracious is the word that I would use to describe what is going on," said Bart Mellits, chair of Ballard Spahr's real estate department, which has more than 100 lawyers.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
SEPTA wants more riders and the Franklin Institute wants more people to visit its museum, so they're getting together for another promotion. Through the end of September, holders of a SEPTA DayPass or a Family Fare will receive $1 off the purchase of up to five combination tickets at the Franklin Institute Science Museum. The museum offers three types of combination tickets that admit the holder to regular museum exhibits and from one to three extra activities, including the Mission to Mars Simulation, the Omniverse Theater and Fels Planetarium.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Edmund E. DePaul, a lawyer whose courage, integrity and talents inspired countless young attorneys to stretch and reach the heights of their profession, died yesterday. He was 67 and lived in Overbrook. A tough, crusty son of Italian immigrants, in another time and place he would have been the old-fashioned country lawyer, defending the widow for a jar of preserves in payment. In the city, he did the equivalent and served for 11 years with the public defender's office. He also had been an assistant U.S. attorney and was in private criminal practice.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Commissioner Mark F. DiGiovanni of the Seventh Ward has notified the Marple Township Board of Commissioners that he is resigning his seat before his term expires on Dec. 31, citing work-related reasons. DiGiovanni had previously decided not to seek re-election to a second term, and L. Stephen Sudhop, a builder, received the Marple Township Republican Party's endorsement for the Seventh Ward seat. Sudhop is running unopposed. DiGiovanni practiced law in Media until last a year, when he accepted a position in Philadelphia, according to Martin Nash, board vice president.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathleen Wilkinson has made a career litigating disputes over matters as varied as employment law and construction accidents. Now she is about to take over as chancellor of the 13,000-member Philadelphia Bar Association, a task that arguably is as demanding as representing a corporate client in a high-stakes lawsuit. But, given the complexity of Philadelphia's legal community, it is also a role that requires a measure of political skill. Wilkinson, who will give her inaugural address Tuesday at the bar association's annual meeting and luncheon, says fast-paced changes in the legal profession have imposed a changed agenda on the group.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 1, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a lengthy drought, real estate lawyers are a hot commodity again. The biggest firms in Philadelphia and other cities with booming real estate markets say finding lawyers skilled in handling the zoning, tax, and transactional pieces of complex projects has become a near impossibility. There simply aren't enough lawyers to go around, and that has stretched existing practice groups and forced firms to move lawyers internally from other specialties. " Voracious is the word that I would use to describe what is going on," said Bart Mellits, chair of Ballard Spahr's real estate department, which has more than 100 lawyers.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JON A. BAUGHMAN was an outstanding Philadelphia lawyer - but that's not all he was. "He was a man of total integrity, who loved life, loved his family and loved his job," said his lawyer son, Michael E. Baughman. His father was a man who delighted in feeding the homeless on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway with his church, playing tennis and nurturing seeds in his garden in Fort Washington to produce corn, tomatoes and peppers and flowering fruit trees. But most of all, Jon Baughman, longtime partner at Pepper Hamilton LLP, was a family man. "I keep hearing what a great lawyer he was," said his son. "But he was an even greater father.
NEWS
October 5, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
It appears that the death of "Big Law," so widely predicted a few years ago, has been greatly exaggerated. After a breathtaking pullback following the recession of 2008 and 2009, hiring at large law firms in Philadelphia and around the nation has revived. Large classes of first-year lawyers are arriving this week and next at many local firms, and while the numbers are not as high as they were before the financial crisis, some law-firm leaders have begun to talk of staff shortages and juggling legal personnel to meet surging client demand.
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2008, U.S. District Judge Jerome B. Simandle wound up with a political hot potato in his caseload. The Camden federal judge had to rule on one of the "birther" lawsuits - filed in courts across the nation by people contending that presidential candidate Barack Obama was not qualified for the job because he was not a "natural-born citizen" of the United States. No matter how a judge ruled, accusations of playing politics would inevitably ensue, said Simandle, now chief judge of New Jersey's federal court system.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathleen Wilkinson has made a career litigating disputes over matters as varied as employment law and construction accidents. Now she is about to take over as chancellor of the 13,000-member Philadelphia Bar Association, a task that arguably is as demanding as representing a corporate client in a high-stakes lawsuit. But, given the complexity of Philadelphia's legal community, it is also a role that requires a measure of political skill. Wilkinson, who will give her inaugural address Tuesday at the bar association's annual meeting and luncheon, says fast-paced changes in the legal profession have imposed a changed agenda on the group.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was the ultimate lawyer role model, a valiant fighter for human rights who battled against steep odds. The fondest hope of many young lawyers a generation ago was to be like the dashing Gregory Peck as he played Atticus Finch in the film To Kill a Mockingbird . Such was the case for Michael Fitts, dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school, who saw Finch as the embodiment of lawyerly ideals. To Fitts, Finch was a lawyer of incomparable decency, courage, and sure-handedness, as fine a lawyer prototype as you might want.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BACK IN 1974, a little boy almost drowned in a city-run swimming pool in South Philadelphia. At age 5, he was brain-damaged and a quadriplegic. His father was missing and his mother was dying of cancer. Along came Robert C. Daniels to save the day. He filed a negligence suit against the city, won a $1.8 million settlement and got the boy into a home. It was a case Bob Daniels was so proud of, he called himself a "lawyer of the people. " And that was the role that Bob adhered to during more than 40 years of legal practice, in which he specialized in personal-injury cases, winning settlements for the victims of catastrophic accidents.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2010 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 8 a.m., and lawyer Cecilia Isaacs-Blundin, crisply attired in a pin-striped suit and trailing a large roll-around briefcase, strides into her office, which on this day happens to be a jail in the fortresslike 25th District police headquarters in North Philadelphia. Her clients are not the big commercial companies she typically represents as a lawyer in Ballard Spahr L.L.P.'s white-collar defense practice. Rather, they are standard-issue criminal defendants, accused of a smorgasbord of street offenses including drug possession, dealing, and assault.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2009 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When big law firms began announcing en masse in the spring that the battered economy had forced them to delay the hiring dates of new law-school graduates, the news sent shock waves through recruits and the schools that had been busily churning them out. But then the idea was only an abstraction. Now the deferral programs have kicked in, and young lawyers by the hundreds are entering the workforce - just not quite in the same manner they had imagined as starry-eyed law students.
NEWS
July 30, 2009
THIS WEEK, 1,500 frantic state workers rallied in Harrisburg to protest the state's budget impasse, which has resulted in them receiving only partial paychecks this month. Until a deal is done, future paydays may also be slashed or even postponed. Neil Krum understands workers' terror, because he's living it. He's a lawyer who makes his living as a court-appointed attorney representing children in Family Court. It's been three months since the city cut him a check for the important work he does for a revolving caseload of about 100 clients.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|