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Young Love

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Lantern Theater Company's Romeo and Juliet begins before it begins: fights on the street, stealthy comings and goings, women are grabbed, rich, highborn men are drunk and belligerent. Everyone is armed to the teeth - swords and knives - and then somebody says "peace. " Yeah, right. What a place Verona is: Feuds, duels, and havoc will, as they say, ensue. The young star-crossed lovers will, through their suicides, teach their parents the need for reconciliation. This old, sad story is about two teenagers from warring families who have a moment of joy only to have things go terribly wrong through an agony of mistiming, mistakes, parental commands, and just plain bad luck.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989 | By Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
From a suburban nether land somewhere between "Heathers" and those John Hughes-Molly Ringwald movies comes "Say Anything. " It's a coming-of-age romantic comedy that exhibits more than a passing acquaintance with psychological reality, even as it bends over backward to please. The word likable was coined to describe John Cusack's Lloyd Dobler, a gangly military brat who has just graduated from high school. Living in Seattle with his single-mother sister (played by Cusack's real-life sibling Joan)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1986 | By NANCY M. REICHARDT, Special to the Daily News
It's summer. Time to lie on the beach and cultivate a tan. And for the daytime soaps it's time for hot new romances and the rekindling of some of the love stories that have gone sour during the cold months of winter. What's your favorite soap hold in store for you during the dog days to come? The following is just a sampling of some of the story lines you can look forward to. Unlike the past several summers, there will not be an abundance of teen romances to wade through. Although several soaps will feature "young love" stories, this year the focus seems to be on the lives and loves of the soap's more "mature" characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Hugo Wolf's success in writing opera was limited, but in his song cycle Das italienisches Liederbuch, he succeeded in sketching an opera full of sentiment, nobility and comedy. This group of 46 songs doesn't reach the stage often, which made the performance Friday at the Convention Center all the more intriguing. Soprano Benita Valente and baritone William Stone managed, with only voice and text, to create the characters of a comedy of manners in which the piano, played by the remarkable David Golub, took a sly and equal role.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
Taylor Swift No one's doing more to break down the barriers between country and pop than Taylor Swift. Maybe that's because no one else in contemporary music can touch the hearts of (mostly teen) girls - and spark their shrieks - quite like this 23-year-old Wyomissing singer/songwriter/guitar (and banjo!) player, wearing her heart on her sleeve and in your favorite gossip column/mag/show/website/tweet. "Hi, I'm Taylor," she announces herself to the crowd. "I write songs about feelings.
NEWS
September 24, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
A thing of beauty is a joy forever - so wrote John Keats, who proved his own point by becoming one of poetry's immortals. He was also pale, handsome, misunderstood, seductive and embroiled in a flaming yet chaste love affair with a young beautiful woman, as we see in the swooning romance "Bright Star. " Circumstances, you see, made consummation of their love impossible. So they pursued something more pure, an intermingling of souls, the emotional ecstasy of being matched at the 29 deepest levels of compatibility, etc. Hmm. Immortal, pure, chasteĀ .
NEWS
July 20, 1987 | BY DON WILLIAMSON
Falling in love gets harder with age. Young love seems only to require time and opportunity - and frequently, not a whole lot of time. The young don't worry about longevity because forever is a 30-minute TV show. They don't consider financial security, because their love doesn't cost anything. There's no need to worry about a potential lover's past, because neither partner has been around long enough to have one. Young lovers seldom share the concerns that give their parents gray hairs, knotted stomachs and permanent forehead wrinkles.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "I had her home telephone number, and I daren't call it for a week. I was like, 'Should I, should I?' " - Scary Spice Mel B, on approaching R&B star Mary J. Blige to suggest a duet Ah, young love. Well, it's young love in the case of actress Catherine Zeta Jones, 29. Not so young, of course, in the case of her paramour Michael Douglas, who's 54. In the afterglow of their recent vacation together on a Spanish beach, the Welsh beauty appears smitten with crusty actor Douglas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The issue in Donald Margulies' engrossing drama Time Stands Still is not whether you can come home again. The issue is whether you can stay there. In a beautifully wrought production at Delaware Theatre Company in Wilmington, the play comes off as both realistic and deeply felt by its characters. Time Stands Stil l is about a complex woman - a news photographer (Susan McKey) much more at home on a battlefield than in her real home in Brooklyn, which she shares with a writer (Kevin Kelly)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
A joke among diabetics is that we're not allowed to see The Sound of Music because of all the sugar. Well, there's plenty of the sweet stuff, but after adjusting my insulin pump at Media Theatre, something I'd forgotten hit me as the show progressed: its clear, dark side. The Sound of Music may be tra-la-la in a way that fogs all but the most rose-colored lenses, yet it's set in 1938 Austria, and as the plot creeps forward so does the German march on Europe. The tenor of the musical changes, at first subtly and then more so, until the ending, when it's clear that Austria will for all purposes lose its sovereignty.
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SPORTS
February 2, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER STFF WRITER
The emotion really hit Thaddeus Young when he arrived at his hotel Thursday night. The Minnesota Timberwolves forward said he was greeted by countless fans as he prepared for his first trip back to Philadelphia as an ex-76er. "At the hotel, the people received me and said they missed me and it's been crazy," Young said before Friday's game at the Wells Fargo center against the Timberwolves. Young was gratified by a gesture done by the Sixers, who framed three of his old Philadelphia jerseys and had them waiting for him in the Timberwolves locker.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Greeks drank to it. Shakespeare rhapsodized about it. But young love has never been fetishized more than in modern pop culture. As far as TV and the movies are concerned, romance exists only for twentysomething hardbodies with tight abs and heaving bosoms. Not so Alan and Celia, the septuagenarians who fall passionately in love in PBS' superb six-part dramedy, Last Tango in Halifax , which premieres at 8 p.m. Sunday. Played to perfection by stage and screen virtuosi Sir Derek Jacobi, 74, and Anne Reid, 78, Alan and Celia knew each other 60 years ago when, as teenagers, they secretly developed crushes on each other.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
For gifts, they asked for vinyl records. And teaching supplies for their classrooms. Will and Jamie Reid held their May 26 wedding at the College of Physicians, choosing that site because it was, like them, a little quirky, home to the famous Mutter Museum with its collection of medical oddities. They were so happy that Sunday, friends recalled, the evening cool and dry and the couple brimming with youth and vitality, their successful college careers complete, their lives as Philadelphia schoolteachers ahead, their home on Broad Street a base for exploring the city.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
Taylor Swift No one's doing more to break down the barriers between country and pop than Taylor Swift. Maybe that's because no one else in contemporary music can touch the hearts of (mostly teen) girls - and spark their shrieks - quite like this 23-year-old Wyomissing singer/songwriter/guitar (and banjo!) player, wearing her heart on her sleeve and in your favorite gossip column/mag/show/website/tweet. "Hi, I'm Taylor," she announces herself to the crowd. "I write songs about feelings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Reprinted from Thursday's edition. There is no Starbucks in sleepy Gatlin, S.C., laments young Ethan Wate, so it's completely understandable that he wants out. High school is a drag, too, and the sole movie theater can't even get the titles right on its marquee. But then Lena Duchannes, glamorously Goth, moves into town, and Ethan's world is upended. It's as if a spell had been cast, which, in the over-the-top supernatural teen romance Beautiful Creatures , isn't that surprising.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Lantern Theater Company's Romeo and Juliet begins before it begins: fights on the street, stealthy comings and goings, women are grabbed, rich, highborn men are drunk and belligerent. Everyone is armed to the teeth - swords and knives - and then somebody says "peace. " Yeah, right. What a place Verona is: Feuds, duels, and havoc will, as they say, ensue. The young star-crossed lovers will, through their suicides, teach their parents the need for reconciliation. This old, sad story is about two teenagers from warring families who have a moment of joy only to have things go terribly wrong through an agony of mistiming, mistakes, parental commands, and just plain bad luck.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The issue in Donald Margulies' engrossing drama Time Stands Still is not whether you can come home again. The issue is whether you can stay there. In a beautifully wrought production at Delaware Theatre Company in Wilmington, the play comes off as both realistic and deeply felt by its characters. Time Stands Stil l is about a complex woman - a news photographer (Susan McKey) much more at home on a battlefield than in her real home in Brooklyn, which she shares with a writer (Kevin Kelly)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
A joke among diabetics is that we're not allowed to see The Sound of Music because of all the sugar. Well, there's plenty of the sweet stuff, but after adjusting my insulin pump at Media Theatre, something I'd forgotten hit me as the show progressed: its clear, dark side. The Sound of Music may be tra-la-la in a way that fogs all but the most rose-colored lenses, yet it's set in 1938 Austria, and as the plot creeps forward so does the German march on Europe. The tenor of the musical changes, at first subtly and then more so, until the ending, when it's clear that Austria will for all purposes lose its sovereignty.
NEWS
September 24, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
A thing of beauty is a joy forever - so wrote John Keats, who proved his own point by becoming one of poetry's immortals. He was also pale, handsome, misunderstood, seductive and embroiled in a flaming yet chaste love affair with a young beautiful woman, as we see in the swooning romance "Bright Star. " Circumstances, you see, made consummation of their love impossible. So they pursued something more pure, an intermingling of souls, the emotional ecstasy of being matched at the 29 deepest levels of compatibility, etc. Hmm. Immortal, pure, chasteĀ .
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Romeo (we're talking the real Romeo - balcony, Verona, love-lamed and all) says his spirit "lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts," does he really need to leap as he says the words lifts me? And what about Juliet's dad? Sure, he's exasperated because his daughter refuses to accept the marriage he's arranged to the noble but passionless Paris - wouldn't you be, if you'd gone to all that trouble? She'd better be in church for the nuptials, he commands, as Juliet sobs at his feet, or "I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.
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