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NEWS
December 1, 1994 | By QUIARA HUDES
Four years ago, when I stood at my uncle's funeral, I was just beginning to learn about loss. His wife, children and family stood around me, unwilling to let go. Back then I didn't know what AIDS was, except that it had killed someone I loved. My family's tears were soon transformed into statistics. His death became only another unfortunate loss like so many others. Quickly labels were placed on him, labels that many people associate with AIDS. Gay, straight, white, black. Within all the categories he was placed, he lost his individual importance, his self.
NEWS
July 1, 2003 | By SHIRLEY M. KITCHEN
IN JUST A FEW months the citizens of Philadelphia will face an important election to decide who will be the next architects of city planning. Now is the time to register to vote for the Nov. 4 election -especially for those who represent an important group of voters that seem to be "missing. " I know that this group of missing individuals is brimming with fresh ideas, convictions and hope, and that it could bring so much to our political process. The group I am speaking of is the thousands of young Philadelphians who are not yet registered to vote.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
THE PHILADELPHIA Marathon is a life-transforming event for even the most experienced athlete. For 35 runners, it was part of a much larger journey - a challenge that began transforming their lives long before the starting gun. They were among the youngest runners, and easy to spot. In royal blue, they were part of Students Run Philly Style - a unique program that uses marathon training as a catalyst for changing lives and helping some of the city's most disadvantaged teens go further in life.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Peter Van Allen, Special to The Inquirer
Men and women ages 16 to 21 got a taste of police basic training in a boot camp during the Law Enforcement Explorer Training Academy at Fort Dix two weeks ago. Twenty-eight people were whipped into shape and taught the basics of law enforcement in one week of intensive training. This was the fourth annual academy, organized by Sgt. Tim Richardson of the Burlington Township Police Department. "The kids were up at 4 a.m. doing physical training, and they didn't get to sleep until 12:30 at night," said New Jersey State Trooper Nancy Tegeder.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Aastha Arora is one in a billion. At least that's what they called her when she was born May 11, 2000. Designated with great fanfare as the symbolic one billionth Indian, Aastha - her name means "faith" in Hindi - is now called something different. "They call me 'the special child' at school," the perky sixth grader said in the family's two-room apartment. "Teachers, friends know about the big ruckus when I was born. " In the last 11 years, India has added 240 million people and, according to U.N. estimates, is on target to surpass China as the world's most populous nation in 2020.
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Larry Atkins
Today's young people don't need Kevin Spacey or Haley Joel Osment to tell them to pay it forward. Despite all of the lamenting about the apathy, narcissism and decline in values and morals of today's young people, there is one sign that contradicts this stereotype. For several years, this generation of young people has been more active in volunteering and giving than perhaps any that came before it. According to figures from the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, 13 million teenagers, or 59 percent of America's teen population, volunteer more than 3.5 hours a week.
NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By Nicole Lister
This is the latest in a new series titled "The Inquirer College Board," featuring opinion pieces by writers from local colleges and universities. Do you believe in God? If so, you are one of 91 percent of Americans who do, provided you are 18 or older, according to a 2007 Newsweek poll. However, believing in God, having faith that there's a higher power, and being religious are not the same. In fact, many people believe but are not religious, or have faith and are not religious.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
By Claire Robertson-Kraft and Matt Goldfine Philadelphia is the city that goes to sleep early, as young people from other big cities can tell you. And if City Council goes ahead with a nightlife crackdown now under consideration, we'll be going to bed even earlier, making the city less attractive to young people. Many of us remember the brain drain. Several years ago, studies showed that Philadelphia's universities brought in almost 50,000 freshmen a year, but retained less than half that population after graduation.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | By Michael T. McCarthy
One of government's key roles is to protect and promote commerce. That's why government should help pay for the construction of sports stadiums here and in Pittsburgh. Think about the close ties between government and commerce throughout American history. To promote and protect trade, our government has pursued military action, such as attacking the buccaneers in Tripoli. It purchased the Louisiana territory. In Undaunted Courage, Steven Ambrose recently chronicled the role that Lewis and Clark played in enhancing commerce in the uncharted West.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Rea gazed out at the sea of people on Independence Mall yesterday and saw new hope for her church. Many of the faces she saw were those of children and their young parents, the families that will make up the nucleus of the American Presbyterian Church as it struggles to slow a recent erosion in membership. The younger congregants were easily outnumbered by their older colleagues. But to Rea, the gulf between the generations did not seem quite as wide as before and was an encouraging sign for a church seeking a burst of new enthusiasm.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PERRY FENNELL had this peculiar habit. A dedicated runner, he always searched the ground ahead for a penny. He probably wouldn't have turned down something with a larger value, but it was a penny he coveted. "He always felt it was a special day when he found a penny," his family said. Perry, a prominent dentist and longtime community leader, ran the annual Broad Street Run, a number of other races, and one marathon. What did he do with the pennies? He collected them in jars, and, knowing what kind of a man he was, he probably ended up using them in some worthy cause or other.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I HAVE A POSTER hanging in my house advertising a panel discussion at my old newspaper. The title of the panel? "Twenty-somethings Tell Us Why The Paper Sucks. " When I pass by that poster these days, I mostly wonder one thing: "How did no one slap the smug snot out of us?" But the other night, as I listened to a panel of millennials at an event that was part of Young Involved Philadelphia's State of Young Philly, I started to wonder - maybe reminisce is the word - about other things.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I WENT ON an informal meet-and-greet of young leaders in the city this summer. First stop was a dynamic group of young black men who were doing all kinds of grassroots work in their neighborhoods. Among them, Anton Moore, who founded a local nonprofit called Unity in the Community to help unify his South Philadelphia neighborhood, and Alex Peay, who heads another nonprofit called Rising Sons, an after-school program to help young black men succeed. Next were the irrepressible Doley sisters, Emaleigh and Aine.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Parents simultaneously applaud and cry each year as their children make their way down a runway at a small fashion show for charity. For the children, who have various disabilities, the show is a chance to dress up and forget any struggles they may have off the catwalk. For their families, it is a chance to see their children, who might not be able to score a winning goal or compete in a spelling bee, shine in public. "It doesn't happen as easily with our kids, so these moments are really special," Suzanne Borio of Plymouth Meeting said.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN KATHLEEN Young came to Philadelphia from a small town in North Carolina to attend nursing school, it had to have been something of a culture shock. But rather than being cowed or changed by the clash of environments, Kathleen adjusted, got married, had five children and reveled in the artistic opportunities available in an urban setting. She brought her Southern charm and graciousness with her, and they never deserted her. Kathleen Troncelliti, as she became after marrying world-renowned surgeon Manrico A. Troncelliti, a tireless volunteer in numerous charitable and civic endeavors, devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, died Sept.
SPORTS
September 10, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
CONSIDERING THE horrific nature of the incidents that led to the football program at Penn State being slapped with severe sanctions by the NCAA, it is difficult to separate emotions from an objective analysis. When we are talking about the case of a serial pedophile possibly being granted access to more innocent victims because of the inaction of others who may have been aware, it is hard to care about the collateral damage from the penalties laid down by the NCAA. While it is still a matter of considerable debate, I personally believe that members of the Penn State athletic department, including legendary coach Joe Paterno, knew enough about what former defensive coordinator and now convicted pedophile Jerry Sandusky was doing but turned eyes in favor of protecting the program over the safety of children.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
ISSUE | SCHOOLS Earth to Harrisburg State Rep. Kate Harper's letter (Aug. 21) criticized an editorial that correctly described the legislature's lack of interest in helping schools ("It isn't just city schools," Aug. 17). She claimed that there is strong support for passing a city-only cigarette tax, as if that would be some huge favor. She didn't mention that the tax was a last-ditch proposal by city officials to make up for lackluster state funding. Harper claims Philadelphia gets more money from the state each year without any accountability.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Anton Moore, engaging people through social media, word of mouth, and street-corner conversation has been a way of building bridges between people and communities. Concerned about violence this year between young men in his South Philadelphia community and those of Southwest Philadelphia, Moore, 28, thought of bridges. "What I wanted to do was open the dialogue up," Moore said last week, "to bring leaders together to build a rapport and get on a first-name basis so that we could work together.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The violent deaths of five children in eight days, including three who were mowed down by a hijacked car in North Philadelphia, are sparking outrage in communities around the city and calls to action by antiviolence activists. Those activists, from a spectrum of community antiviolence groups, held a rally Thursday evening at LOVE Park to talk about ways to prevent homicides among children and young people in the city. In an interview before the rally, Anton Moore, an antiviolence advocate in South Philadelphia, said adults must engage young people and talk to them about ways to avoid violence.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Corey Schiller had barely turned 30 when he became chief executive of what was then a $130 million home-remodeling company. Now Power Home Remodeling Group, of Chester, employs 1,350 and will report, Schiller said, $300 million in revenue for 2014. Schiller, 32, a soccer-playing history major, was 21 when he and his best friend started at Power as junior salesmen right out of college. Two years later, Schiller earned a promotion to lead a marketing department of 40 people. He was 23 years old. Question: How did that go?
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