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Young People

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NEWS
December 1, 1994 | By QUIARA HUDES
Four years ago, when I stood at my uncle's funeral, I was just beginning to learn about loss. His wife, children and family stood around me, unwilling to let go. Back then I didn't know what AIDS was, except that it had killed someone I loved. My family's tears were soon transformed into statistics. His death became only another unfortunate loss like so many others. Quickly labels were placed on him, labels that many people associate with AIDS. Gay, straight, white, black. Within all the categories he was placed, he lost his individual importance, his self.
NEWS
July 1, 2003 | By SHIRLEY M. KITCHEN
IN JUST A FEW months the citizens of Philadelphia will face an important election to decide who will be the next architects of city planning. Now is the time to register to vote for the Nov. 4 election -especially for those who represent an important group of voters that seem to be "missing. " I know that this group of missing individuals is brimming with fresh ideas, convictions and hope, and that it could bring so much to our political process. The group I am speaking of is the thousands of young Philadelphians who are not yet registered to vote.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
THE PHILADELPHIA Marathon is a life-transforming event for even the most experienced athlete. For 35 runners, it was part of a much larger journey - a challenge that began transforming their lives long before the starting gun. They were among the youngest runners, and easy to spot. In royal blue, they were part of Students Run Philly Style - a unique program that uses marathon training as a catalyst for changing lives and helping some of the city's most disadvantaged teens go further in life.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Peter Van Allen, Special to The Inquirer
Men and women ages 16 to 21 got a taste of police basic training in a boot camp during the Law Enforcement Explorer Training Academy at Fort Dix two weeks ago. Twenty-eight people were whipped into shape and taught the basics of law enforcement in one week of intensive training. This was the fourth annual academy, organized by Sgt. Tim Richardson of the Burlington Township Police Department. "The kids were up at 4 a.m. doing physical training, and they didn't get to sleep until 12:30 at night," said New Jersey State Trooper Nancy Tegeder.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Aastha Arora is one in a billion. At least that's what they called her when she was born May 11, 2000. Designated with great fanfare as the symbolic one billionth Indian, Aastha - her name means "faith" in Hindi - is now called something different. "They call me 'the special child' at school," the perky sixth grader said in the family's two-room apartment. "Teachers, friends know about the big ruckus when I was born. " In the last 11 years, India has added 240 million people and, according to U.N. estimates, is on target to surpass China as the world's most populous nation in 2020.
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Larry Atkins
Today's young people don't need Kevin Spacey or Haley Joel Osment to tell them to pay it forward. Despite all of the lamenting about the apathy, narcissism and decline in values and morals of today's young people, there is one sign that contradicts this stereotype. For several years, this generation of young people has been more active in volunteering and giving than perhaps any that came before it. According to figures from the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, 13 million teenagers, or 59 percent of America's teen population, volunteer more than 3.5 hours a week.
NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By Nicole Lister
This is the latest in a new series titled "The Inquirer College Board," featuring opinion pieces by writers from local colleges and universities. Do you believe in God? If so, you are one of 91 percent of Americans who do, provided you are 18 or older, according to a 2007 Newsweek poll. However, believing in God, having faith that there's a higher power, and being religious are not the same. In fact, many people believe but are not religious, or have faith and are not religious.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | By Michael T. McCarthy
One of government's key roles is to protect and promote commerce. That's why government should help pay for the construction of sports stadiums here and in Pittsburgh. Think about the close ties between government and commerce throughout American history. To promote and protect trade, our government has pursued military action, such as attacking the buccaneers in Tripoli. It purchased the Louisiana territory. In Undaunted Courage, Steven Ambrose recently chronicled the role that Lewis and Clark played in enhancing commerce in the uncharted West.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Rea gazed out at the sea of people on Independence Mall yesterday and saw new hope for her church. Many of the faces she saw were those of children and their young parents, the families that will make up the nucleus of the American Presbyterian Church as it struggles to slow a recent erosion in membership. The younger congregants were easily outnumbered by their older colleagues. But to Rea, the gulf between the generations did not seem quite as wide as before and was an encouraging sign for a church seeking a burst of new enthusiasm.
NEWS
December 13, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Young people who are contemplating suicide usually show a cluster of signs, mental-health experts say. They tend to withdraw from family and friends, and become uninterested in activities that had been important to them. "Their grades may be dropping. Or they may have physical symptoms," said Ellen Sholevar, director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Temple University Children's Medical Center, Temple University Hospital, and Episcopal Hospital. "A teenager may also talk about feeling they are a bad person, that they wish they were dead.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, For The Inquirer
One day - just one - is all Mont Brown says he needs to make an impact on youth-related violence in his neighborhood and, he hopes, yours, too. On Saturday, Brown, 26, will be throwing his 2d Annual Stop the Violence Kickback Block Party, at 55th Street and Chester Avenue, in Southwest Philadelphia. He conceived the concert as a means to provide a positive and safe alternative for youth in his neighborhood. Now the lead rapper of the alternative rap/rock band Astronauts Really Fly (ARF)
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
TWO YOUNG MEN were shot dead on the streets of Southwest Philadelphia a few blocks away from each other on a cold Friday in January. They died minutes apart. "This is insane," City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson recalled thinking when he heard the news. The deaths of Jahmeer Jett and Benjamin Collier on Jan. 17 prompted community leaders from the area to reach out to Johnson to discuss the ongoing problem of youth and guns that plagues their neighborhoods, he said. Johnson, who had already established a gun task force in South Philadelphia, decided to spin off the idea in Southwest.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | MAYOR MICHAEL NUTTER & MAYOR MITCH LANDRIEU
IN AMERICA, our young African-American men struggle to survive, let alone thrive. For many, the deck is stacked against them from day one - dangerous neighborhoods, poor schools, inadequate health care, no jobs and no hope. The challenges we face are both wide and deep. Throughout his career and as president, Barack Obama has taken on these tough problems and shown his commitment to our young people of color. Now, we applaud the president and lock arms with him in support of the new White House initiative, My Brother's Keeper.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IT'S BEEN A MONTH since Penn freshman Madison Holleran died by suicide. An athletic and academic standout in high school, she had been dismayed by her 3.5 grade-point average at Penn and had struggled to balance her studies with her varsity track training. By Jan. 17, she was so despondent, she took her life. Three weeks later, Penn sophomore Elvis Hatcher did the same. Both suicides ignited much debate about the life-or-death pressures of college life (particularly in the Ivy League)
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has become a magnet for young people in the powerhouse demographic group known as millennials, with residents ages 20 to 34 now accounting for more than a quarter of the city's population, according to a report released Wednesday. The surge from 2006 through 2012, primarily in neighborhoods surrounding Center City, has helped reverse population decline and lifted the percentage of Philadelphia's young adults into line with New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, according to "Millennials in Philadelphia" by the Pew Charitable Trusts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
SINCE TODAY looks like a perfect time to stay inside and watch TV, here are a few TV-related Tattle items. In Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro is blaming soap operas for the country's high crime rate, accusing them of spreading "anti-values" to young people by glamorizing violence, guns and drugs. Last year, Maduro attacked violent video games and the movie "Spider-Man," which, we guess, spread the value of being bitten by a radioactive spider to young people. It's unclear, however, whether the government will take steps to restrict programming or impose harsher rules on the soap operas, known as telenovelas, which are hugely popular across Latin America.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
TWO recent economic experiments tell us a good deal about the priorities of young Americans. They want marijuana, and they're not so crazy about Obamacare. First, the pot. Colorado essentially legalized the drug Jan. 1. There are lines around the block, most outlets are already sold out, and the price has shot up to $400 an ounce. A quick look at photos of those lined up for pot tells you they're exactly the kind of people Obamacare needs. Most experts agree that Obamacare would work best if the so-called young invincibles would agree to buy insurance.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
Signs of growth The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society agrees that there is an urgent need to inspire young people to study horticulture as a profession and to raise awareness of the vital role of plants and gardens in our environment ("Is horticulture a withering profession?" Jan 6). But the society sees cause for optimism as well. Our membership has grown by 38 percent in the last three years, to 25,000 households. Among the fastest-growing groups of new members are those ages 18 to 35. We also see signs of increasing appreciation for horticulture and its value throughout our neighborhoods.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Have you ever wanted to invest in a young person - invest in him or her as you would a stock or a bond? Basically, investing in the person's future value? Now you can, via a website called Upstart. Dave Girouard, Upstart's cofounder and CEO, was formerly president of Google Enterprise, and dreamed up the idea of backing young people financially. Rather than invest in a company, Upstart backers invest in young people, like University of Pennsylvania 2012 graduate Michael Olorunnisola.
NEWS
December 17, 2013
CHARLES KENNY'S proposed solution to unemployment is interesting but shortsighted. Not everyone collecting unemployment benefits is young. I know from personal experience. In March of 2012, I was laid off from a position I'd held for 27 years. In the interim, I've landed exactly one temporary job and some very satisfying but unpaid volunteer work. I find myself in the unenviable position of competing with people half my age for jobs that pay half of what I had been making.
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