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NEWS
December 1, 1994 | By QUIARA HUDES
Four years ago, when I stood at my uncle's funeral, I was just beginning to learn about loss. His wife, children and family stood around me, unwilling to let go. Back then I didn't know what AIDS was, except that it had killed someone I loved. My family's tears were soon transformed into statistics. His death became only another unfortunate loss like so many others. Quickly labels were placed on him, labels that many people associate with AIDS. Gay, straight, white, black. Within all the categories he was placed, he lost his individual importance, his self.
NEWS
July 1, 2003 | By SHIRLEY M. KITCHEN
IN JUST A FEW months the citizens of Philadelphia will face an important election to decide who will be the next architects of city planning. Now is the time to register to vote for the Nov. 4 election -especially for those who represent an important group of voters that seem to be "missing. " I know that this group of missing individuals is brimming with fresh ideas, convictions and hope, and that it could bring so much to our political process. The group I am speaking of is the thousands of young Philadelphians who are not yet registered to vote.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
THE PHILADELPHIA Marathon is a life-transforming event for even the most experienced athlete. For 35 runners, it was part of a much larger journey - a challenge that began transforming their lives long before the starting gun. They were among the youngest runners, and easy to spot. In royal blue, they were part of Students Run Philly Style - a unique program that uses marathon training as a catalyst for changing lives and helping some of the city's most disadvantaged teens go further in life.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Peter Van Allen, Special to The Inquirer
Men and women ages 16 to 21 got a taste of police basic training in a boot camp during the Law Enforcement Explorer Training Academy at Fort Dix two weeks ago. Twenty-eight people were whipped into shape and taught the basics of law enforcement in one week of intensive training. This was the fourth annual academy, organized by Sgt. Tim Richardson of the Burlington Township Police Department. "The kids were up at 4 a.m. doing physical training, and they didn't get to sleep until 12:30 at night," said New Jersey State Trooper Nancy Tegeder.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The powder looks harmless enough. But when added to water, the packet of Palcohol creates an adult beverage with the same alcohol content of a standard mixed drink. It can also be snorted, creating a choking hazard, or abused, by adding too much powder or mixing it with drugs for a dangerous high, state lawmakers said. Legislation that would prohibit the sale, delivery, or purchase of powdered alcohol is awaiting Gov. Christie's signature following overwhelming approval Monday by the Senate and Thursday by the Assembly.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Aastha Arora is one in a billion. At least that's what they called her when she was born May 11, 2000. Designated with great fanfare as the symbolic one billionth Indian, Aastha - her name means "faith" in Hindi - is now called something different. "They call me 'the special child' at school," the perky sixth grader said in the family's two-room apartment. "Teachers, friends know about the big ruckus when I was born. " In the last 11 years, India has added 240 million people and, according to U.N. estimates, is on target to surpass China as the world's most populous nation in 2020.
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Larry Atkins
Today's young people don't need Kevin Spacey or Haley Joel Osment to tell them to pay it forward. Despite all of the lamenting about the apathy, narcissism and decline in values and morals of today's young people, there is one sign that contradicts this stereotype. For several years, this generation of young people has been more active in volunteering and giving than perhaps any that came before it. According to figures from the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, 13 million teenagers, or 59 percent of America's teen population, volunteer more than 3.5 hours a week.
NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By Nicole Lister
This is the latest in a new series titled "The Inquirer College Board," featuring opinion pieces by writers from local colleges and universities. Do you believe in God? If so, you are one of 91 percent of Americans who do, provided you are 18 or older, according to a 2007 Newsweek poll. However, believing in God, having faith that there's a higher power, and being religious are not the same. In fact, many people believe but are not religious, or have faith and are not religious.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | By Michael T. McCarthy
One of government's key roles is to protect and promote commerce. That's why government should help pay for the construction of sports stadiums here and in Pittsburgh. Think about the close ties between government and commerce throughout American history. To promote and protect trade, our government has pursued military action, such as attacking the buccaneers in Tripoli. It purchased the Louisiana territory. In Undaunted Courage, Steven Ambrose recently chronicled the role that Lewis and Clark played in enhancing commerce in the uncharted West.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Rea gazed out at the sea of people on Independence Mall yesterday and saw new hope for her church. Many of the faces she saw were those of children and their young parents, the families that will make up the nucleus of the American Presbyterian Church as it struggles to slow a recent erosion in membership. The younger congregants were easily outnumbered by their older colleagues. But to Rea, the gulf between the generations did not seem quite as wide as before and was an encouraging sign for a church seeking a burst of new enthusiasm.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Jan. 25 marked the fifth anniversary of the Tahrir Square revolt - an uprising organized by young Facebook-savvy Egyptians that came to symbolize the Arab Spring. At the time, I spent days in and around the square interviewing the revolt's youthful leaders as well as ordinary Cairenes. Those conversations were inspiring, as housewives, cabbies, laborers, office workers, and students debated how to transform an authoritarian regime into some form of democracy. We know how those hopes crumbled.
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Last fall, the youth development organization Hopeworks 'N Camden hosted its first-ever hack-athon, an event aimed at using technology to find solutions to the city's economic problems. The hack-athon, sponsored by companies that included Subaru of America and Starbucks, hosted 96 young men and women, plus 20 from Hopeworks, as well as 14 developers from various companies. The event has led to a growing relationship between Hopeworks, which provides young Camden residents with high-tech job training, and Subaru, which has since offered company tours and information technology workshops to aspiring Web developers, said Hopeworks executive director Dan Rhoton.
NEWS
January 5, 2016 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
MICHAEL LOCKWOOD was one of those guys who never forgot a name or a face. A lot of people claim that talent, but Michael really lived it. If you met him 20 years ago and ran into him recently, he would call you by your name and greet you like a long lost pal. Michael put this ability to work when he joined various companies with strong retail components - the American Tobacco Co., the Bose Corp. and Creative Channel Retail Markets. His duties included going to stores and other outlets for the products and often training workers on the best ways to sell them.
NEWS
January 5, 2016 | By Daniel Kaye
In the last month, five people in my world have taken their own lives. I knew them to varying degrees; some very closely, others through people I am connected with via work or friendship or service. Three were male, two female. One had a child. Three were in their mid-40s, two were in their late teens or early 20s. Two were very successful in business. Through their suicides, all of them have greatly affected others and have left dozens of loved ones shattered. They struggled with depression, and, from what I have been told by family and close friends, they essentially kept how dark life had become to themselves.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I already know what it's like to be homeless, hungry, and abused," said Carmen Williams, 22, weeping Wednesday as she spoke at a breakfast meeting of educators and business people at Community College of Philadelphia. Now Williams, a single mother and college student, is learning what it's like to be a success, en route to a promotion to shift manager at Starbucks. "Take your time, honey, take your time," murmured someone in the group, as an academic meeting suddenly turned achingly personal.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades the city's Logan section has been known for one thing: sinking houses, a slow-motion disaster that cost millions of dollars and forced hundreds of families to abandon their homes. Now the neighborhood may become notable for something else: basketball. On Thursday, officials will announce that a new nonprofit group, Philadelphia Youth Basketball (PYB), hopes to raise $25 million to build a sports and education complex on part of a forsaken piece of property known as the Logan Triangle.
NEWS
November 16, 2015
D EAR ABBY: My husband is a partner in a small law firm. One of the secretaries has gotten into the habit of texting him somewhat inappropriate pictures. One of them was of a "willy warmer" for a penis. I know she thinks it's funny and harmless, but it bothered me. I think it was unprofessional and went beyond the boundaries of an employee relationship. If I mention it to my husband, he will know I looked at his phone messages, and I don't want him to think I don't trust him. Am I making too much of this?
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
On Two Street Tuesday, they had a name for this election: the South Philly lottery. As in, South Philly's number was about to come in. Jimmy in the mayor's office. Kevin looking good for a seat on the state Supreme Court. And Kevin's older brother, Johnny Doc, the powerful union leader, the kingmaker, making it all happen. "People are ecstatic," said Richie Conway, a committeeman working the polling place at the Herron Playground on Second and Reed. Like everyone else working there, Conway knew Kenney from - where else?
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deputy Commissioner Kevin A. Bethel, one of the highest-ranking members of the Philadelphia Police Department, will retire in January to join an advocacy group that focuses on youth violence prevention. Bethel, a 29-year member of the force, runs patrol operations and is known as a strong proponent of community-oriented policing tactics. His name was among those floated as a possible replacement for Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, who is retiring in January. Ramsey said working with Bethel was a "joy," and called his work for the department "immeasurable.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's sure to look out of place - an old, gray-and-blue couch set on the edge of fashionable Rittenhouse Square. But feel free to take a seat. The people putting it there want passersby to settle into the cushions for a few minutes of conversation on a disquieting topic - young people who are pushed into homelessness largely because of their sexuality. Youths generally don't go to shelters. Instead, they can end up moving couch to couch at the homes of friends, acquaintances, or strangers - vagabond guests hidden from those who could help, and potentially exposed to exploitation from people who invite them inside for all the wrong reasons.
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