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NEWS
December 1, 1994 | By QUIARA HUDES
Four years ago, when I stood at my uncle's funeral, I was just beginning to learn about loss. His wife, children and family stood around me, unwilling to let go. Back then I didn't know what AIDS was, except that it had killed someone I loved. My family's tears were soon transformed into statistics. His death became only another unfortunate loss like so many others. Quickly labels were placed on him, labels that many people associate with AIDS. Gay, straight, white, black. Within all the categories he was placed, he lost his individual importance, his self.
NEWS
July 1, 2003 | By SHIRLEY M. KITCHEN
IN JUST A FEW months the citizens of Philadelphia will face an important election to decide who will be the next architects of city planning. Now is the time to register to vote for the Nov. 4 election -especially for those who represent an important group of voters that seem to be "missing. " I know that this group of missing individuals is brimming with fresh ideas, convictions and hope, and that it could bring so much to our political process. The group I am speaking of is the thousands of young Philadelphians who are not yet registered to vote.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
THE PHILADELPHIA Marathon is a life-transforming event for even the most experienced athlete. For 35 runners, it was part of a much larger journey - a challenge that began transforming their lives long before the starting gun. They were among the youngest runners, and easy to spot. In royal blue, they were part of Students Run Philly Style - a unique program that uses marathon training as a catalyst for changing lives and helping some of the city's most disadvantaged teens go further in life.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Peter Van Allen, Special to The Inquirer
Men and women ages 16 to 21 got a taste of police basic training in a boot camp during the Law Enforcement Explorer Training Academy at Fort Dix two weeks ago. Twenty-eight people were whipped into shape and taught the basics of law enforcement in one week of intensive training. This was the fourth annual academy, organized by Sgt. Tim Richardson of the Burlington Township Police Department. "The kids were up at 4 a.m. doing physical training, and they didn't get to sleep until 12:30 at night," said New Jersey State Trooper Nancy Tegeder.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Aastha Arora is one in a billion. At least that's what they called her when she was born May 11, 2000. Designated with great fanfare as the symbolic one billionth Indian, Aastha - her name means "faith" in Hindi - is now called something different. "They call me 'the special child' at school," the perky sixth grader said in the family's two-room apartment. "Teachers, friends know about the big ruckus when I was born. " In the last 11 years, India has added 240 million people and, according to U.N. estimates, is on target to surpass China as the world's most populous nation in 2020.
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Larry Atkins
Today's young people don't need Kevin Spacey or Haley Joel Osment to tell them to pay it forward. Despite all of the lamenting about the apathy, narcissism and decline in values and morals of today's young people, there is one sign that contradicts this stereotype. For several years, this generation of young people has been more active in volunteering and giving than perhaps any that came before it. According to figures from the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, 13 million teenagers, or 59 percent of America's teen population, volunteer more than 3.5 hours a week.
NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By Nicole Lister
This is the latest in a new series titled "The Inquirer College Board," featuring opinion pieces by writers from local colleges and universities. Do you believe in God? If so, you are one of 91 percent of Americans who do, provided you are 18 or older, according to a 2007 Newsweek poll. However, believing in God, having faith that there's a higher power, and being religious are not the same. In fact, many people believe but are not religious, or have faith and are not religious.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | By Michael T. McCarthy
One of government's key roles is to protect and promote commerce. That's why government should help pay for the construction of sports stadiums here and in Pittsburgh. Think about the close ties between government and commerce throughout American history. To promote and protect trade, our government has pursued military action, such as attacking the buccaneers in Tripoli. It purchased the Louisiana territory. In Undaunted Courage, Steven Ambrose recently chronicled the role that Lewis and Clark played in enhancing commerce in the uncharted West.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Rea gazed out at the sea of people on Independence Mall yesterday and saw new hope for her church. Many of the faces she saw were those of children and their young parents, the families that will make up the nucleus of the American Presbyterian Church as it struggles to slow a recent erosion in membership. The younger congregants were easily outnumbered by their older colleagues. But to Rea, the gulf between the generations did not seem quite as wide as before and was an encouraging sign for a church seeking a burst of new enthusiasm.
NEWS
December 13, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Young people who are contemplating suicide usually show a cluster of signs, mental-health experts say. They tend to withdraw from family and friends, and become uninterested in activities that had been important to them. "Their grades may be dropping. Or they may have physical symptoms," said Ellen Sholevar, director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Temple University Children's Medical Center, Temple University Hospital, and Episcopal Hospital. "A teenager may also talk about feeling they are a bad person, that they wish they were dead.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
MELISSA ALVAREZ enjoys it when police officers behave like pals. "This officer just took a selfie with me, the other greeted us with high-fives," said the 17-year-old Frankford resident, who is also president of the Philadelphia Youth Commission. "I want to see more officers like that!" Alvarez was one of several panelists at "Securing our Future," a meeting on community policing yesterday in City Hall organized by several groups including the Police Advisory Commission, the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations and the mayor's office.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY PETER ORSZAG
YOUNG PEOPLE are disaffected with the political process and lack any interest in running for office, a new book by Jennifer Lawless, of American University, and Richard Fox, of Loyola Marymount University, demonstrates. Yet the book itself perhaps unintentionally underscores one of the key reasons why: We know too much about our politicians. There are 519,682 elected officials in the U.S., the authors note, the vast majority of whom hold local jobs; they are mayors, city councillors, school-board members, coroners or recorders of deeds.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Columnist
A FUNNY THING happened on the way out of the forum. Not ha-ha funny, but stay with me for a moment. It happened Thursday, after yet another mayoral forum - this one hosted by the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists, at Community College of Philadelphia. When all six candidates were offstage, where they posed for photos, I had a chance to pose one final question, so I asked: What didn't we ask you tonight that you wish we had? During the next 12 minutes, we had chest-pounding, insinuations and even a little drama.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When the Camden Supper Club convenes, optimism is on the menu. The informal monthly dinner is a chance for young city residents, students, entrepreneurs, and others to break bread together - and enjoy a night out in a town they believe is on the rise. "This is amazing," Web designer Joseph Russell, 30, says, sampling stewed oxtail over rice Tuesday at the Reggae Grill on the 2100 block of Federal Street, where 15 people are sharing the table. Like Russell, a Collingswood resident, some live outside the city.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY TAMARA BROWNLEE
ON MARCH 6, I attended the funeral of one of my cousins. It was the day after the young officer, Robert Wilson, was shot while attempting to buy his son a birthday gift. As I lay in bed, I reminisced about my cousin and how we both had our struggles in life growing up and how, like me, he had come to peace with himself. Just as my cousin was making peace with himself, an incident happened where he lived, at the Safe Haven Veterans Home. He was found dead, mysteriously. His struggles were over.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It should be no secret by now that having guns in the home increases the chances that a member of the family will kill himself or herself. But the extent of the increase may surprise some people. In a study of adults, epidemiologist Douglas Wiebe found that the risk of suicide is three times higher for people who have a gun in the home than for people without guns. Guns in the home also raise the risk of homicide and accidental deaths. "The bottom line is that people with a gun in the home are more likely to die by suicide than other people," said Wiebe, who studies risks associated with gun ownership at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IT WAS ALMOST one big bucket of buttery popcorn all for me at Riverview Cinemas on Sunday. The nasty weather that wreaked havoc on Philly roads over the weekend also forced most of the young people I invited to see "Selma" to cancel. Sixteen-year-old Zoie Thomas rescued me and my waistline. After her doll of a mother dropped her off and I gave away the other tickets to people in line - pay it forward, or backward in this case - we headed in. Turns out Thomas had seen the movie already.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PERRY FENNELL had this peculiar habit. A dedicated runner, he always searched the ground ahead for a penny. He probably wouldn't have turned down something with a larger value, but it was a penny he coveted. "He always felt it was a special day when he found a penny," his family said. Perry, a prominent dentist and longtime community leader, ran the annual Broad Street Run, a number of other races, and one marathon. What did he do with the pennies? He collected them in jars, and, knowing what kind of a man he was, he probably ended up using them in some worthy cause or other.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I HAVE A POSTER hanging in my house advertising a panel discussion at my old newspaper. The title of the panel? "Twenty-somethings Tell Us Why The Paper Sucks. " When I pass by that poster these days, I mostly wonder one thing: "How did no one slap the smug snot out of us?" But the other night, as I listened to a panel of millennials at an event that was part of Young Involved Philadelphia's State of Young Philly, I started to wonder - maybe reminisce is the word - about other things.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I WENT ON an informal meet-and-greet of young leaders in the city this summer. First stop was a dynamic group of young black men who were doing all kinds of grassroots work in their neighborhoods. Among them, Anton Moore, who founded a local nonprofit called Unity in the Community to help unify his South Philadelphia neighborhood, and Alex Peay, who heads another nonprofit called Rising Sons, an after-school program to help young black men succeed. Next were the irrepressible Doley sisters, Emaleigh and Aine.
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