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NEWS
December 1, 1994 | By QUIARA HUDES
Four years ago, when I stood at my uncle's funeral, I was just beginning to learn about loss. His wife, children and family stood around me, unwilling to let go. Back then I didn't know what AIDS was, except that it had killed someone I loved. My family's tears were soon transformed into statistics. His death became only another unfortunate loss like so many others. Quickly labels were placed on him, labels that many people associate with AIDS. Gay, straight, white, black. Within all the categories he was placed, he lost his individual importance, his self.
NEWS
July 1, 2003 | By SHIRLEY M. KITCHEN
IN JUST A FEW months the citizens of Philadelphia will face an important election to decide who will be the next architects of city planning. Now is the time to register to vote for the Nov. 4 election -especially for those who represent an important group of voters that seem to be "missing. " I know that this group of missing individuals is brimming with fresh ideas, convictions and hope, and that it could bring so much to our political process. The group I am speaking of is the thousands of young Philadelphians who are not yet registered to vote.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
THE PHILADELPHIA Marathon is a life-transforming event for even the most experienced athlete. For 35 runners, it was part of a much larger journey - a challenge that began transforming their lives long before the starting gun. They were among the youngest runners, and easy to spot. In royal blue, they were part of Students Run Philly Style - a unique program that uses marathon training as a catalyst for changing lives and helping some of the city's most disadvantaged teens go further in life.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Peter Van Allen, Special to The Inquirer
Men and women ages 16 to 21 got a taste of police basic training in a boot camp during the Law Enforcement Explorer Training Academy at Fort Dix two weeks ago. Twenty-eight people were whipped into shape and taught the basics of law enforcement in one week of intensive training. This was the fourth annual academy, organized by Sgt. Tim Richardson of the Burlington Township Police Department. "The kids were up at 4 a.m. doing physical training, and they didn't get to sleep until 12:30 at night," said New Jersey State Trooper Nancy Tegeder.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The powder looks harmless enough. But when added to water, the packet of Palcohol creates an adult beverage with the same alcohol content of a standard mixed drink. It can also be snorted, creating a choking hazard, or abused, by adding too much powder or mixing it with drugs for a dangerous high, state lawmakers said. Legislation that would prohibit the sale, delivery, or purchase of powdered alcohol is awaiting Gov. Christie's signature following overwhelming approval Monday by the Senate and Thursday by the Assembly.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Aastha Arora is one in a billion. At least that's what they called her when she was born May 11, 2000. Designated with great fanfare as the symbolic one billionth Indian, Aastha - her name means "faith" in Hindi - is now called something different. "They call me 'the special child' at school," the perky sixth grader said in the family's two-room apartment. "Teachers, friends know about the big ruckus when I was born. " In the last 11 years, India has added 240 million people and, according to U.N. estimates, is on target to surpass China as the world's most populous nation in 2020.
NEWS
January 14, 2003 | By Larry Atkins
Today's young people don't need Kevin Spacey or Haley Joel Osment to tell them to pay it forward. Despite all of the lamenting about the apathy, narcissism and decline in values and morals of today's young people, there is one sign that contradicts this stereotype. For several years, this generation of young people has been more active in volunteering and giving than perhaps any that came before it. According to figures from the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, 13 million teenagers, or 59 percent of America's teen population, volunteer more than 3.5 hours a week.
NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By Nicole Lister
This is the latest in a new series titled "The Inquirer College Board," featuring opinion pieces by writers from local colleges and universities. Do you believe in God? If so, you are one of 91 percent of Americans who do, provided you are 18 or older, according to a 2007 Newsweek poll. However, believing in God, having faith that there's a higher power, and being religious are not the same. In fact, many people believe but are not religious, or have faith and are not religious.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | By Michael T. McCarthy
One of government's key roles is to protect and promote commerce. That's why government should help pay for the construction of sports stadiums here and in Pittsburgh. Think about the close ties between government and commerce throughout American history. To promote and protect trade, our government has pursued military action, such as attacking the buccaneers in Tripoli. It purchased the Louisiana territory. In Undaunted Courage, Steven Ambrose recently chronicled the role that Lewis and Clark played in enhancing commerce in the uncharted West.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Rea gazed out at the sea of people on Independence Mall yesterday and saw new hope for her church. Many of the faces she saw were those of children and their young parents, the families that will make up the nucleus of the American Presbyterian Church as it struggles to slow a recent erosion in membership. The younger congregants were easily outnumbered by their older colleagues. But to Rea, the gulf between the generations did not seem quite as wide as before and was an encouraging sign for a church seeking a burst of new enthusiasm.
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NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
WHOEVER THOUGHT that urban farming was a way to demonstrate that black lives matter - just as much as everyone else's? The youth who started Life Do Grow Farm in North Philadelphia thought so. They say "the farm," as they call it, is about more than just growing food. It's about community building and changing the neighborhood surrounding the farm on 11th Street near Dakota, a few blocks north of Temple University. "Going to these protests [such as for Black Lives Matter]
NEWS
July 16, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Fund schools equally As a former member of the Lower Merion school board, I disagree with the commentary about the controversies involving charter schools and student testing ("Can Real World and Education World get along?" Wednesday). Neither annual testing nor state-based curricular standards will help our young people learn. We already know that large numbers of students in Lower Merion test "advanced" and that too many students in the Philadelphia School District - whether in charter schools or traditional public schools - test "below basic.
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Ten-year-old Jaheim Martin loves shooting layups at Philadelphia Youth Basketball camp, but he also likes working out in a particular off-court space: A classroom. "It's good," he said, stepping momentarily away from a hotly contested board game that requires calculations based on NBA player statistics. "It's like, math is fun, because you're playing with your friends. " At PYB, organizers have embraced the backboard and the blackboard, incorporating a daily academic curriculum that uses basketball to teach a variety of concepts.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
ISSUE | THE HOMELESS The young suffer, too After reading Mike Newall's original column about Matt, a 28-year-old homeless man in Center City, I had my doubts about him being a veteran. No vet, having served our country, should be living on the streets anywhere in our country ("Heroin Hall," May 25). Why wouldn't he take advantage of every possible resource available to veterans as opposed to his daily objective of getting his next hit of heroin? There must be a deeper reason that his family would allow him to remain homeless.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
When Joseph Hill Coles was 17, he sold drugs for food, slept in LOVE Park, and withstood the indignities of adult homeless shelters. One of an unknown number of homeless youths in Philadelphia, he risked injury, emotional torment, and worse, living open and unprotected on the streets of the city. "Anger consumed me," said the young man, who aged out of foster care. "I was someone no one seemed to want. I was running wild, a complete mess. " Coles, now a 22-year-old youth advocate, shared his story at a hearing Thursday before the joint City Council Committees on Children and Youth, and Housing, Neighborhood Development and the Homeless.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS AN open letter to the young people of Philadelphia. Specifically the kids growing up in the zip codes - 19132, 19121, 19133, and 19134 - with the lowest life expectancy, the kind normally seen in war zones. But really, this letter is for all the young people who live in poor, crime-ridden neighborhoods from which people have long ago disinvested and disengaged. Where poverty runs so deep that it probably seems there isn't a shovel big enough to dig yourself out, with crime that traps you in your homes and educations so substandard that even under the best circumstances, you'll probably always be playing catch-up.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | Staff report
Below is a transcript of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' interview Wednesday with The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News editorial boards. Questions were edited for space.  Above each question is an audio player containing both the question and response. Your browser does not support the audio element. Sanders: This campaign is a very different type of campaign than we have seen for a very, very long time. I honestly believe that we have the possibility of pulling off one of the great political upsets in the history of the United States of America.
NEWS
March 19, 2016
By Donte L. Hickman Recently, I had a conversation with a leading pastor about what is necessary to shift the trends and transform the urban centers of America. He shocked me by saying that he believes poverty is not the root cause of gang violence, substance abuse, and lethargy among some in the black community today - lack of faith is. He began to highlight our own individual upbringings in abject poverty and argued that he and I obviously were able to choose positive paths of productivity.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Services will be held Saturday, March 12, for Herman C. Ahrens Jr., 91, an editor, educator, and lay leader of his church in Lansdale. Dr. Ahrens died Wednesday, Feb. 24, of a heart ailment at Abington Hospital-Jefferson Health. Born in Port Washington, Ohio, he came from a family that valued religious faith. His father, the Rev. Herman C. Ahrens Sr., was a minister; one of Dr. Ahrens' sons is pastor to a United Church of Christ congregation in Columbus, Ohio. A graduate of Harding High School in Marion, Ohio, Dr. Ahrens earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Heidelberg University in Tiffin, Ohio, and completed a bachelor of journalism degree with honors from the University of Missouri in 1950.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Kids from rough neighborhoods can't escape real-world violence when they use social media. Instead, a new academic study finds something that families, schools, and police have learned the hard way: Negative experiences from the streets spill over into the "digital hood" - and can even start there. "Facebook not only mirrors the challenges and dangers of life in a disadvantaged community, but also amplifies the most negative aspects of the community," the researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers University concluded.
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