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Young People

NEWS
July 2, 2004 | By Marybeth Hagan
While lifeguards keep swimmers in safe waters, members of Generation Life are delivering tidings along New Jersey beaches that they hope will save their peers from a deluge of sexually transmitted disease. Generation Lifers, in their teens and 20s, swim against the cultural tide. Members want to spread the word that the only safe sex is lifetime fidelity between two HIV- and STD-free people. That's what members do during school presentations in the fall, winter and spring, when they also fight for the rights of the unborn.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Gregory Thomas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public transportation riders are in for a more colorful commute come Thursday. That's the day the city's only independent organization serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths launches its first public advertising campaign, with 100 posters on SEPTA buses and subway cars. The Attic Youth Center, an after-school LGBT sanctuary in Center City, is taking its message, "It's OK to Be You," to the streets in an attempt to reach young people suffering from homophobic bullying.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Democrat Joyce Alexander Walker may have made history Tuesday as the first African American elected to Township Council here, but you wouldn't have known it to see her yesterday. After weeks of hectic campaigning, Walker had a lot of catching up to do at her business in Cherry Hill, and she had a very important constituent waiting in her office. It was Christina McGinnis, 17, whom Walker mentors through a program sponsored by the township Chamber of Commerce. She comes to Walker's office Wednesday afternoons to learn how Walker manages Multifacet, her husband's multimillion-dollar industrial supply business.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Vance Moss wears his hospital-issued surgical scrubs and a stethoscope, people notice - especially other African Americans. Moss said the attire draws questions about how he made it - questions he committed to answering when he and his twin brother, Vincent, founded Youth Leadership Initiative Campaign in Washington in 1992. "The media image of African American men are as athletes, entertainers or criminals," said Vincent Moss, 26. "When young people - black or white - see this, they get ingrained in their minds that the only way to get out is through these fields.
NEWS
June 30, 2003 | By Dwayne Campbell and Amie Parnes INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
They are young and innocent, mostly, and they ring doorbells at nice homes, making a fervent pitch. Some of them say they are college students trying to earn tuition money. Some seek to win homeowners' sympathy by saying they are trying to climb out of poverty. They offer books, household cleaning products and, most often, magazines. Many are not college students. Some are estranged from their families. Some are drifters or runaways with troubled pasts and perhaps criminal records, said Bucks County police, who recently arrested 10 people on charges of selling without a license.
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Mayor James M. McAnany was a young pip skating circles around the duffers at the Lansdowne Ice and Coal ice rink, he attracted the attention of one of the rink's operators, who promptly referred him to someone who could give a skating kid a break. That someone was a contact in the Shipstads & Johnson Ice Follies, and before long, McAnany was on the circuit, performing his brand of acrobatic skating in towns around the country. His work eventually led to a scholarship for a two-year dance course at the Juilliard School for the Performing Arts in New York, where he studied ballet and modern dance, and to a stint as a Broadway dancer.
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | By Melissa Milewski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a program scheduled to start in September, dozens of high school graduates and dropouts living in city housing projects will be trained to set up and run their own businesses. Project residents from 16 to 24 years old are eligible for the $200,000 program, which will be funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and run by a private contractor to be chosen later this summer. "This is a national thrust from HUD to give the young people marketable skills so they can reach self-sufficiency," said Valena Dixon, public affairs director for the Philadelphia Housing Authority.
NEWS
June 1, 1996 | By William Raspberry
You hear it a lot from men my age: "The Army made me a man. " It's never quite clear what we nostalgic ones (mostly draftees) have in mind. But it seems to involve some combination of learning to get along with all sorts of people, growing accustomed to putting the group's interest above our own and discovering we can handle physical discomfort and even danger. Nancy Geyer Christopher thinks we may simply be talking of growing up. Military service - at least during the days of the draft - was a rite of passage into adulthood.
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After an 18-year-old resident was shot and killed on a street corner last week - allegedly over a cigarette lighter - and after dozens of students at Chester High School brawled on the streets last week, State Rep. Thaddeus Kirkland decided things had gotten so bad that action could not wait until after the holidays. Kirkland (D., Delaware) called an emergency meeting - in the middle of the bustle between Christmas and New Year's Day - to discuss what could be done to stop young people from hurting and killing one another with guns.
NEWS
March 15, 1999 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The drummer laid down a beat, the organ kicked in, and the congregation of the First African Baptist Church began to clap in time. About two dozen of the church's youngest congregants - the boys in black pants, black shirts and kente cloth ties, the girls in black skirts and white blouses - slid-stepped diagonally left, then right, in procession toward the altar. "Holy," they sang, stretching the word's two syllables across several seconds, "Holy Lord God almighty. " At the front of the congregation, the Rev. Richard Dent stood waiting for his children.
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