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Young Women

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NEWS
September 10, 1986 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is a drizzly, steel-gray morning in Woodbury and inside the Lighthouse Community, young women are descending the staircase with their babies, four, five, six of them, shaking off sleep, taking another tentative step toward the razor-edged world outside the windows. Their hair still wet from showers, their babies sucking contentedly on bottles, the women settle into chairs in a small sitting room. Covering the walls are religious inscriptions and pictures and a number of images of lighthouses.
NEWS
November 20, 1987 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1904, a group of civic-minded Jewish women founded the Rebecca Gratz Club to cushion the way for young immigrant women, newly arrived in America. In the mid-1940s, with immigration interrupted by World War II, the group turned its attentions to young women who had flocked to Philadelphia, seeking jobs in the city's industries. By the 1950s, the focus shifted again, to mentally and emotionally troubled women who had nowhere else to turn. The late 1960s and early '70s saw yet another focus, on the problems of troubled, abused or neglected teenage girls.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Whether it's combing through Grandmother's attic, recycling worn-before gowns, shopping at off-the-beaten-path boutiques, or hitting up the online luxury dress rental site Rent the Runway, young women attending Saturday night's Academy Ball will be changing up staid red-carpet rules. "I'm renting my dress because I like the idea that I'm getting to wear a really nice designer gown without breaking the bank," said Andrea Lewis. Lewis, 26, is a Rutgers University Ph.D. student whose gold beaded Nicole Miller will be arriving Thursday at her Center City apartment from Rent the Runway, where you can borrow from the latest special-occasion designer collections for a fraction of the price.
NEWS
September 1, 2007 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
College fraternities, long known as bastions of grace and decorum, are these days featuring yet one more accoutrement of scholastic refinement - the stripper pole. The most important campus development since the keg, the stripper pole shines like a luminous totem festooning the halls of the American academy. It's erected for a single, glorious purpose: To get drunken chicks to do slutty stuff. As students convene on college campuses, many will be partying on and around sturdy items such as the portable Lil' Mynx dance poles, manufactured with love in Fresno, Calif.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Look out for Girl Culture. The focus on young women is here, and it's getting bigger. It's showing up in novels, academic studies, guidebooks and TV commercials. Watch the young women in the Nike commercial urge parents to let their girls play sports. "If you let me play," the girls tell the camera, then the chances of the girls suffering from a number of social and health ills will shrink. The message: Playing sports increases a girl's self-esteem. Page through "The College Woman's Handbook" (Dobkin & Sipp)
NEWS
October 3, 2009 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their friendship didn't get off to the easiest start. Phyllis Markoff was waiting in her oncologist's office for chemotherapy treatment when she noticed the scarf on the woman across from her, a woman also in her mid-30s named Emily Scattergood. Markoff asked where she bought it. "She just said, 'My sister got it for me.' I was wearing my wig and she didn't think I was a cancer patient so she was really put off," said Markoff, of Cherry Hill. "I was like, 'I'm going to the beach, and I don't want to go bald.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janel Schillig has been stepped on, kicked, and whacked in the head. She has faced objects flying at her at high speeds. She has been bruised and battered - and wouldn't trade the experience for anything else. That is because Schillig is a soccer goalie, a position that carries with it a long list of occupational hazards. When a ball takes flight, a goalie is considered fair game. Sure, she can use her hands, but that doesn't mean opponents can't barrel into her at full force. Yet despite the dangers, Schillig relishes her role: "I just love playing the game, and it's such a great challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A feverish, coming-of-age melodrama about same-sex love consummated in a Canadian girls' school, Lost and Delirious aspires to be both the bookend to and update of that 1931 landmark, M?dchen in Uniform. Filmmaker L?a Pool's perfectly cast, if insufficiently dramatized, film presents three adolescent female archetypes on a collision course. There is the goddess, a sexually experimental bombshell named Victoria, played by va-va-voomy Jessica Par? of Stardom fame. There is the tomboy, an unapologetic lesbian named Paulie, played by plucky Piper Perabo of Coyote Ugly infamy.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | MICHELLE MALKIN
TWENTY YEARS from now, when my baby daughter is on the brink of full adulthood, I will tell her about my experience as a 20-year-old intern in Washington, D.C. A decade ago, I headed to the District for a month-long stint in a Senate office. Like most dreamy-eyed and ambitious young women in the Beltway, I was high on the glamor and history of our august Capitol, in awe of all the important men who rustled and hustled in dark tailored suits, and impressed with the media entourages that trailed the politicians like starved ducklings.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | by Diane Joy Moca, Los Angeles Daily News
Baby boomers are taking a backseat to the MTV generation on the small screen these days, as more and more network series feature characters in their 20s. Spelling Television is responsible for producing many of these shows, including "2000 Malibu Road," a new CBS drama that can be seen Sunday before moving to its regular Wednesday time slot. In keeping with the youth theme of other series from Aaron Spelling's production company, the show follows a group of young female roommates sharing a spectacular beachfront home in Southern California.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2015
DEAR ABBY: Two years ago, I met a gentleman, and he eventually decided we were "soul mates. " I agreed. Over time, we shared our life stories, good and bad. I confided that I'd had an abortion at the age of 18, which has haunted me all my adult life. Recently he was reciting a chronology of my life. When he got to the abortion, he said, ". . . and then you became a child murderer. " His comment stunned me. He finds nothing wrong with it. Was this total disrespect, or am I overreacting?
NEWS
August 7, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I have been married to "Ken" for 10 years. He is a successful business owner. It has been a struggle to stay married to him because he has control issues, and when he doesn't get his way he begins a verbal assault on his victim - usually me. He has no friends because he runs them off, claiming they did him wrong (not true), and his employees don't like him and talk badly about him behind his back. They stay because he pays well. He uses his money to control people.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | BY REKHA BASU
RAHA MOHARRAK was 25 when her parents said it was time for her to marry, but she decided she wasn't a toaster - as in " Ping! It's ready" - the Saudi Arabian woman told a U.S. audience recently. "I wasn't ready. " Nor was she interested in giving up her job, car or independent life in Dubai, or up for the demeaning ritual in which "you get all dolled up, get onstage and dance at a wedding, and wait for some mom to see you and say, 'She's good for my son.' " Instead, Moharrak climbed Mount Everest.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AT LAST, from Bill Cosby's own ugly mouth, we have his admission that he obtained sedatives to give to young women with whom he wanted to have sex. "I meet [her] in Las Vegas," he says of one of his accusers, a 19-year-old, in the 2005 court transcript obtained this week by the Associated Press . "She meets me backstage. I give her Quaaludes. We then have sex . . . I think she may very well have been happy to be around the show-business surroundings. " Maybe that's how Cosby lived with himself after every encounter involving himself, a beautiful young woman and the Quaaludes that put her into a stupor while Cosby allegedly roamed over her like a cigar-smoking Land Rover.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Friday, Saray Hernandez Salazar, 17, will stand up in front of her classmates as salutatorian of Bridgeton High School's Class of 2015. That's remarkable mostly because there was a time not long ago when Hernandez Salazar wasn't sure she'd graduate at all. As an undocumented immigrant, she felt hopeless - until her sophomore year, when the introduction of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) gave her a chance for temporary legal status. "I did get discouraged," she said.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a pregnancy test that is biodegradable and can be flushed down the toilet. Bethany Edwards, CEO and co-founder of LIA Diagnostics, hopes her credit-card-sized device will become a force in the vast pregnancy home test market and be ready for sale online by the end of 2016. "Pregnancy test kits are one-time use and made of plastic so they aren't environmentally friendly," said Edwards, 30. "There's also no privacy in the current test kits as they can easily be discovered in the trash.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Three women - Denise Uzzelle, Joanna Schwartz, and Ashton Sweitzer - competed to win a $10,000 bonus in the nationwide "Know Your Value" tour that was opened recently in Philadelphia by Mika Brzezinski, host of MSNBC's Morning Joe . Asking for raises empowers working gals, Brzezinski believes. Only one came away with the 10 grand. (Keep reading to find out who!) The winner also earned the unexpected: a serious panic attack; a strange but fruitful jog around the Liberty Bell; funding for her start-up; and an experience she'll never forget.
NEWS
April 24, 2015
I AM THE FATHER of four beautiful girls and a fifth who passed away suddenly at the age of 19 in December. I just read Helen UbiƱas' article in Tuesday's Daily News . I felt the need to email you to tell you how powerful it was! I have been preaching to my daughters since they were young that if they respect themselves, no man can ever disrespect them. As a young man raised by a single mother, I grew up sometimes without the direction that can only come from a father. I, too, had my misguided perceptions of relationships with women.
NEWS
April 13, 2015
ISSUE | THE SEXES Teach respect for women early When people ask me for proof that we are living in a rape culture, I will show them Clark DeLeon's recent Currents column ("Naked truth about boy-girl dealings," April 5). DeLeon's piece enforces the victim-blaming mentality that still runs rampant, especially when it comes to sexual harassment and assault. How dare DeLeon insinuate that young women should hold to a higher moral standard and not expect men to do the same? "Boy will be boys" is a too-tired excuse for sexual harassment, assault, and mistreatment of women.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Alice Paul wouldn't have wanted her Mount Laurel birthplace to become a historical museum. She focused on the future - on a day when equality for women finally would be enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. So I imagine the pioneering suffragist and feminist (1885-1977) would feel right at home at today's Paulsdale, headquarters of an educational and advocacy organization that carries on her mission. "When we decided to do something to honor Alice Paul, we weren't interested in a plaque," says Barbara Irvine, 70, of Cinnaminson, who helped found the Alice Paul Institute in 1985.
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