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Youth Council

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NEWS
September 23, 1996 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the first time in about 40 years, the West Chester branch of the NAACP will have an official youth council to serve black teenagers in the area. Yesterday, Thomas A. Smith Jr., the president of the Pennsylvania State Conference of the NAACP, presented a charter at the West Chester Community Center. "This is a unique day for you," Smith said. "There are not too many communities across the state, and across this nation, that can boast they have a youth council. " He estimated that statewide, the NAACP had about 15 youth councils.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council yesterday defeated by a 5-2 vote a controversial measure - called a "political football" by insiders - that would have established a mayor's youth council. The youth council would have served as an advisory board between the mayor's office and the city's crime-plagued juvenile population. It was the second time Council had rejected the plan. Council in January voted to take no action on the resolution when questions were raised about financing and procedure. Mayor Aaron A. Thompson began setting up the youth council earlier this year to be his link to the community.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The NAACP is looking for members to help set up a youth council branch in Ambler. At an introductory meeting Sunday, about 25 interested youths and their parents came to learn about the organization. A youth council needs 50 dues-paying members between the ages of 13 and 21 to get a charter from the NAACP. Sandra Wilson, NAACP director for eastern Pennsylvania, said the youth council would become one of about 600 local units nationwide and would serve as a training group as well as a way to educate young people about black history.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The local NAACP chapter is using the national organization's 84th anniversary to honor some of its youngest members. The Ambler chapter's NAACP Birthday Celebration Weekend, starting tomorrow, will focus on its Youth Council members, ages 13 to 20. The weekend will include a trip to New York City and two fund-raising events that organizers hope will provide the money for conferences and events later this year. "The experiences that our young people face are still in many ways parallel to those of their parents' generation," said Killraine Dean, who heads the chapter's Youth Council.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Members of the Willingboro school board are calling for a re-evaluation of the district's policy on special requests to use school facilities, saying an event was held at the John F. Kennedy Junior High School even though the sponsoring group violated 10 application procedures. Board Vice President Margaret Reynolds said last week that the youth council for the Willingboro chapter of the NAACP was improperly allowed to hold a conference Aug. 18. Reynolds said the group violated 10 standard procedures, among them rules stipulating that applications be filed by a Willingboro organization, signed by a township resident and submitted two weeks before the event.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Clara Luper, 88, an Oklahoma civil rights icon who led sit-ins at drugstore lunch counters, died Wednesday after a lengthy illness. On Aug. 19, 1958, as the 35-year-old sponsor of the Oklahoma City NAACP Youth Council, Ms. Luper led three adult chaperones and 14 members of the youth council in a sit-in at the Katz Drug Store lunch counter in downtown Oklahoma City. The drugstore refused to serve the group, but the protesters refused to leave, and the sit-in lasted for several days.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whites can't jump, can't sing, can't dance, can't play sports. They're all rich and power-hungry. And they think they're superior. Not to mention that they wear shorts in the wintertime. When Sandra Simmons asked a group of black youths attending a weekend NAACP conference to talk about some stereotypes of white people, the statements flowed and laughter rippled through the audience. But then Simmons got serious. "Is it a fact that white men can't jump?" she asked, taking her cue from a recent movie.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They want a place where neighborhood children can put on a play or a dance program, play basketball and study year-round - day or night. They want a place where youths would have access to job-training, drug prevention and African American culture programs, and information about the history of Crestmont, a section of Abington where blacks have long lived. What they can't get is a building. Establishing such a center has been a goal of the Crestmont Coalition of Neighbors since it was formed about two years ago, said the group's president, Renee Schaffer.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At first glance, this was a prom like any other - chiffons and glittery pumps, cummerbunds and bow ties. Still photographers, tables for 10, mood music to eat by, "Whoop, there it is" to dance by. But on second glance, there were purple ribbons on lapels and an 1863 document reprinted in the program. This was a high school rite of passage with a twist - an awareness prom, an Emancipation Proclamation Ball. "The kids knew I wasn't going to go for just a plain old dance," said organizer Sandra Wilson.
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NEWS
April 9, 2014
A CONTROVERSY sparked by three NAACP board members leading a revolt against the local president began with questions about money. It shattered long friendships. Now it has turned both personal and warthog ugly. Under attack is Stetson-wearing, longtime local NAACP president Jerry Mondesire, accused of playing a shell game with two checks totaling $10,500 intended for the NAACP - one for $10,000, another for $500. There is little question the NAACP's finances are precarious. Philadelphia Gas Works last month slapped a lien on the civil-rights organization for $821.83.
NEWS
June 13, 2011
Her name does not resonate like that of Rosa Parks, and she did not garner the kind of national attention that a group of black students did when they took seats at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C. But Clara Luper was a seminal figure in the sit-ins of the civil rights movement. Ms. Luper, 88, who led one of the first sit-ins - at a drugstore in Oklahoma City 18 months before the Greensboro action - died Wednesday at her home in Oklahoma City, her daughter Marilyn Hildreth said.
NEWS
July 13, 2004 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An African American coalition yesterday announced its intent to form a youth organization to give students a major voice in community issues. Students will be selected for the Generation Next Youth Council when school starts in September, said Emmanuel Bussie, director of operations for the Coalition of African American Organizations. Public, Catholic and private school students will be invited to participate, organizers said. Members will be sought from community and faith-based groups, too. The Philadelphia School District, which hosted yesterday's news conference, has pledged to help by connecting the group with students.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Street administration, which recently helped wrangle $60 million for children's programs as part of a stadium deal with the Phillies and Eagles, refused yesterday to support legislation obligating developers citywide to contribute money to child-enrichment programs. In testimony before City Council's Rules Committee, city Finance Director Janice Davis said she could not support a "Children's Fund" bill sponsored by Councilwoman Marian Tasco because the administration "does not support the idea of linking economic development with the funding of social programs.
NEWS
November 5, 1996 | By Thomas H. Matthews, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Taj Brown could be any teenager. He wears pants that are slightly baggy, carries a backpack, and likes to go to football games on Friday nights. But when he begins to talk, it becomes clear how he has stood out from his fellow students at Downingtown Area High School, where he is a senior. His speech, full of energy, flows easily. He is articulate and persuasive. And he is not afraid to speak up for what he believes in. When he hears something he thinks is wrong, he challenges it. At 17, Brown is one of the youngest presidents the NAACP Pennsylvania Youth Council has ever had. He was elected last year and took office in January.
NEWS
September 23, 1996 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the first time in about 40 years, the West Chester branch of the NAACP will have an official youth council to serve black teenagers in the area. Yesterday, Thomas A. Smith Jr., the president of the Pennsylvania State Conference of the NAACP, presented a charter at the West Chester Community Center. "This is a unique day for you," Smith said. "There are not too many communities across the state, and across this nation, that can boast they have a youth council. " He estimated that statewide, the NAACP had about 15 youth councils.
NEWS
May 5, 1996 | By Shawna McCoy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It may have looked like a regular council meeting, but when the public portion started, the illusion quickly vanished. The seven youthful council members participating in the borough's first Youth in Government Day last Monday night got nothing but praise, and though praise of youngsters may happen occasionally at the regular sessions, it's never been a full 30 minutes' worth. Some called the group inspiring. Others said the sight was something to be cherished, a hope for the future.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | By Lisa E. Anderson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's summer, when children should be thinking about vacation-time things - rollerblading, TV, basketball. For the children in this Upper Dublin Township community, what other youngsters take for granted are not always available. Residents want to change that. More than 100 residents, community leaders and young people met Tuesday night with representatives of the Eastern Regional Youth Council of Montgomery County, one of five councils appointed by the county commissioners to address the problems facing young people.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They want a place where neighborhood children can put on a play or a dance program, play basketball and study year-round - day or night. They want a place where youths would have access to job-training, drug prevention and African American culture programs, and information about the history of Crestmont, a section of Abington where blacks have long lived. What they can't get is a building. Establishing such a center has been a goal of the Crestmont Coalition of Neighbors since it was formed about two years ago, said the group's president, Renee Schaffer.
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