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Youth Programs

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NEWS
April 20, 1992 | By Adam Gusdorff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joe Jurich took a book with him when he went to watch Princeton and Maryland play lacrosse in the spring of 1963. He had agreed to coach Abington's new team, and wanted to see what the game was like before the season began. He took the book in case the sport was dull. "I didn't know anything about lacrosse," he said, "and I thought it might be boring. But I was wrong; it was very exciting. " In just its third year in the sport (1965), Abington was co-champion of the Suburban League with the Hill School.
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia could be forced to eliminate at least $50 million in spending on youth programs because of a change in state funding patterns, city officials said yesterday. Most of the imperiled programs are part of the city Department of Human Services' Division of Community-Based Prevention Services. They include after-school initiatives, truancy programs, and some programs of the nonprofit Philadelphia Safe and Sound. "This really could be devastating," said Cheryl Ransom-Garner, commissioner of the Department of Human Services.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Smiling broadly, the four golfers each clutched a tall trophy. The foursome - Ike Henry, Somerdale, N.J.; Rudy Gause, Philadelphia; Oscar Martin, Camden; and Floyd Bagby, Sicklerville, N.J. - had just won first place in the fifth annual Leon H. Sullivan Charitable Tournament Aug. 15 at Ashbourne Country Club in Cheltenham. After the awards ceremony, the tournament organizers held an auction featuring autographed sports collectibles. In the early 1950s, the Rev. Leon H. Sullivan extended his ministry to the North Philadelphia community and formed Zion Community Center Inc. to serve the city's Nicetown-Tioga section.
NEWS
June 29, 2010
DURING the summer, it seems like many crimes are committed by the city's youth. The city should add more summer jobs, programs and activities for the young. Too much leisure time can equal a higher crime rate. Athletics, youth clubs, educational events, etc., should be expanded. Philip A. Burnett Philadelphia
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
New gym fees designed to hold down taxes could "wipe out" or sharply curtail basketball and cheerleading programs for more than 800 Bensalem children, leaders of three youth groups say. "If we can't get [the fees] reduced, it will basically wipe out the basketball program," David Tressler, president of Valley Athletic Association, said last week. The Bensalem school board in June approved fees of $70 to $300 an hour to help cover energy costs for its 10 gyms, including a new high school gym scheduled to open in the fall.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
When a private agency cut off money for a job-training program operated by civic leader and political power broker Samuel L. Evans, the Goode administration quickly stepped in last month with a $200,000 grant for Evans to run a similar program. The Private Industry Council refused to pay nearly half of its $615,000 contract with Evans' American Foundation for Negro Affairs because it had failed to train the required number of youths. The council's contract with AFNA called for the agency to enroll 450 youths in its job-training and educational counseling program.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rules of Mantua dictate that you do not go walking by yourself at supper time, down the wide-open, glass-strewn streets of this neighborhood, past the shells of houses with their insides jagged like eggs cracked open. Still, this is almost summer; it is steamy warm, and Michael Summers, 9, has an appointment with Macaulay Culkin. The guy working the VCR has already rolled the FBI warnings when Michael heaves open the front door of McMichael School, dollar in hand, and is met by a bevy of youngsters surrounding the little table marked "Movie 50c. " Everyone is calling to "Miss Kim" - Kim Glodec - who is trying to distribute potato chips and small plastic bottles of blue liquid while collecting quarters and hugs from the kids.
NEWS
June 16, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street used the release of a new report on Philadelphia child welfare to pressure Gov. Rendell to close a funding gap that could cost city youth programs at least $50 million. "All of our progress will be jeopardized if the state's child-welfare budget and other line items are reduced or funded in ways that make these programs impossible to support," Street said in a statement released with the report. The report, produced by the city-subsidized nonprofit Philadelphia Safe and Sound, showed incremental progress on some indices of prenatal and early-childhood care but continued bleak statistics on youth violence and other measurements.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Burlington County teams are expected to dominate the South Jersey girls' soccer season. No news there. Last year, The Inquirer's top four teams in the South Jersey rankings came from Burlington County. Moorestown finished No. 1, followed by Shawnee, Lenape and Cherokee. Three of the four South Jersey sectional champions were Burlington County schools. Moorestown won the state Group 2 championship, Holy Cross was the South Jersey champion in Group 3, and Shawnee won in Group 4. Last year five South Jersey players were named to the Associated Press first-team all-state squad.
NEWS
June 29, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Mayor Street and Gov. Rendell still at an impasse over a funding change that could imperil prevention programs for 23,000 city children, a Philadelphia state representative is pushing what he says could be a short-term solution. Democratic Rep. Dwight Evans has written a budget amendment that would allow Philadelphia to use money from a mental health fund to pay for its portion of the endangered youth programs. Evans said the fix was possible because the health fund was running a surplus.
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NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of children were snacking on peaches and eating turkey and cheese sandwiches from box lunches Tuesday when Philadelphia Managing Director Richard Negrin asked them: "How many of you guys have - because I know I have - gone to bed hungry?" Several raised their hands. The gathering at St. Thomas Aquinas School in South Philadelphia was arranged to promote the federal Summer Food Service Program, which was launched Monday in Philadelphia. It offers free meals to children under 18 at more than 1,000 sites in the city.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deesha Dyer, a 37-year-old Philadelphia native, has been named the new White House social secretary, Michelle Obama announced Thursday. She replaces Jeremy Bernard, the first male social secretary, who recently announced that he would leave the post. Dyer, who was Bernard's deputy, started working at the White House in 2009 as an intern in the Office of Scheduling and Advance. The social secretary helps to coordinate state dinners and official visits to the White House, among many duties.
SPORTS
March 29, 2014 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
Nick Ellis met Joe Diaco in third grade, on a lacrosse field in West Deptford. When Ellis moved on to St. Joseph's Prep in Philadelphia for high school, Diaco went to Bishop Eustace. The schools never felt right for either player. After two seasons, Ellis wanted to play for his hometown team. He wanted to play with his best friends, the kids with whom he grew up. "I had been thinking about transferring," said Ellis, who did transfer, along with Diaco, to West Deptford last year for his junior season.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
CRAWLING ALONG a filthy ceiling duct inside Taylor Elementary School, 11-year-old Luis Cruz was terrified. He could hear cops and dogs running through the halls below, looking for him and the three other boys who had broken into the place to steal computers. Luis had never been in trouble with the law. That changed when he dropped from the ceiling and ran for the doors, where police officers stopped him cold. Given Luis' youth, his status as a first-time offender, the nonviolent nature of his crime and the involvement of his parents, a Family Court judge placed him on deferred adjudication.
SPORTS
August 31, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tim Gushue can pinpoint the pivotal moment in Shawnee High School's rise from a solid football team to one of South Jersey's best programs. It was in the late 1980s, when a bunch of enthusiastic young assistants joined Gushue's staff. "That changed everything," Gushue said. Gushue might have been describing himself, Hammonton's Pete Lancetta, and West Deptford's Clyde Folsom as young coaches in those long-ago days - high-energy guys whose passion for the game galvanized three public-school programs and changed fall Friday nights in their towns.
SPORTS
August 31, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tim Gushue can pinpoint the pivotal moment in Shawnee High School's rise from a solid football team to one of South Jersey's best programs. It was in the late 1980s, when a bunch of enthusiastic young assistants joined Gushue's staff. "That changed everything," Gushue said. Gushue might have been describing himself, Hammonton's Pete Lancetta, and West Deptford's Clyde Folsom as young coaches in those long-ago days - high-energy guys whose passion for the game galvanized three public-school programs and changed fall Friday nights in their towns.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facing a $17 million deficit in its operating budget, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia on Thursday closed its youth office, shut down its Hispanic evangelization center, ended publication of its monthly newspaper, and laid off 45 employees - 18 percent of the headquarters staff - as part of a massive restructuring. The cuts, announced by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, come atop his shuttering of 27 schools and nine parishes since arriving in the five-county archdiocese in the fall.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | By Timothy McNulty, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The nonprofit for at-risk youth started by former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky -- which he allegedly used to find boys to sexually abuse -- is moving to disband and transfer its assets to another organization. Officials at the Second Mile foundation filed court papers in Centre County today seeking to transfer its assets to Arrow Child & Family Ministries of Houston, Texas. They are seeking to give Arrow some $2 million in cash and other assets, allowing Arrow to keep running youth programs around Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian Wright is a former offensive lineman, so he knows all about the down-and-dirty work that makes for a successful football team. The former Rowan University assistant coach plans to bring that same blue-collar approach to building a strong program at Cherry Hill West. "This is a great opportunity," said Wright, who has been named football coach at Cherry Hill West. "I know some people think it's a tall task to turn things around. But it can be done. " Wright succeeds Jim Scerbo, who resigned after last season.
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