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Youth Smoking

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NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Anna Edney, Bloomberg News
Fewer American teenagers and young adults are lighting up as cigarette taxes that have broken the $3-a-pack threshold in some states make smoking too costly, according to the latest National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Daily smoking, the leading cause of preventable illness and death in the United States, fell to 15.8 percent in 2010 among young adults 18 to 25, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration said in a report. That share was down from 20.4 percent in 2004.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congress took a first step yesterday toward curbing America's tobacco habit as the Senate Commerce Committee voted 19-1 to pass legislation aimed at sharply cutting youth smoking and tightening regulation of cigarettes. The committee's bill would raise the price of a pack of cigarettes by $1.10 over five years, give the Food and Drug Administration broad power to control cigarette ingredients, restrict cigarette advertising, and cap the tobacco industry's annual legal damages at $6.5 billion.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the Senate prepared to shape a sweeping bill designed to sharply limit use of tobacco, there were signs yesterday that any law that emerges from Congress is likely to be disputed in bitter court battles. The tobacco companies said the draft bill proposed this week by Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) would drive them to bankruptcy and that to survive they would fight back with lawsuits. But opponents said the tobacco executives were exaggerating and the bill should be even harsher.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smoking rates in Philadelphia have dropped to all-time lows, reflecting the effects of a comprehensive tobacco-control campaign, city health officials said Monday. Seven years ago, when rates began steadily falling, 27.3 percent of adults smoked; now, 22.4 percent do. During this period, youth smoking fell from 10.7 to 7.5 percent. Smoking decreased among all racial, ethnic, and socio-economic groups, according to the data, from a regional survey by the nonprofit Public Health Management Corp.
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam and Bob Geiger, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Clinton administration is soon expected to declare nicotine an addictive drug and announce restrictions intended to keep teenagers from smoking. The attempt to restrict tobacco companies' appeals to teenagers and cut youngsters' access to cigarettes may come as early as tomorrow. That would cap a flurry of presidential activity signing popular legislation just days before the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The long-expected move would give explicit authority to the Food and Drug Administration to regulate tobacco sales and advertising to minors.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The tobacco industry's annual legal-liability fines would be limited to $6.5 billion under tough national tobacco-regulation legislation that a key Senate committee is poised to pass. After days of round-the-clock negotiations, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman John McCain (R., Ariz.) yesterday announced the bill, which contains terms far harsher than those the industry agreed to in a proposed settlement last year. The bill would cost tobacco companies up to $506 billion over 25 years, compared with $368.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By JOSEPH P. KEARNEY
ALL OF US have an obligation to do all we can to ensure that kids don't smoke. Smoking is a risky adult behavior, and for reasons of addiction and health, it is particularly risky for underage youth. Without question, it is up to parents, the government, our schools, retail merchants and the tobacco industry to pursue policies and programs restricting youth access to tobacco products. While all of us share a responsibility, parents have a special responsibility to educate and talk to their kids about the risks and dangers associated with tobacco use. Pennsylvania is also taking a hands-on approach as an active participant, especially in the areas of enforcing laws that will impose fines and sanctions against retailers who sell tobacco products to minors.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It should come as no surprise that President Clinton has opted to neither embrace nor condemn the so-called "global tobacco settlement. " It should shock nobody that the master of the bully pulpit has decided to speak softly, play for time, and hope that Capitol Hill takes the lead. Because, in political terms, this historic megabuck megadeal is everything he dreads. It's a hot potato that could burn a lot of powerful people, no matter what happens. It's a massive, divisive issue with no clear political payoff.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For years, a massive Kool cigarette billboard featuring a streaking racing car stood within eyeshot of the Poindexter Elementary School here. Now it is gone. On both sides of the Sonic Restaurant, the choice hangout of the teenagers of Greenville, were billboards for generic brands of cigarettes. Now there are antitobacco ads, courtesy of a state settlement with the tobacco industry. However, in the Eudora Welty Public Library, in Jackson, is an array of magazines full of cigarette ads. Walk a few more blocks to the Spur service station, and you can buy discounted cigarettes for as little as $1.19 a pack.
NEWS
August 24, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton and the Food and Drug Administration delivered yesterday on their promise to regulate the tobacco industry, by announcing severe restrictions on the selling and advertising of tobacco. In a move that will reverberate through the industry and public health - as well as at the presidential hustings in November - the administration declared nicotine an addictive drug and announced regulations to restrict children's access to cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, and the tobacco industry's access to children.
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NEWS
July 1, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smoking rates in Philadelphia have dropped to all-time lows, reflecting the effects of a comprehensive tobacco-control campaign, city health officials said Monday. Seven years ago, when rates began steadily falling, 27.3 percent of adults smoked; now, 22.4 percent do. During this period, youth smoking fell from 10.7 to 7.5 percent. Smoking decreased among all racial, ethnic, and socio-economic groups, according to the data, from a regional survey by the nonprofit Public Health Management Corp.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Born out of crisis and largely overshadowed by its revenue-raising potential for the schools, the proposed $2-per-pack cigarette tax would be among the biggest boons to the health of Philadelphians in decades. Years of research show that a price increase of this magnitude would translate to about a 13 percent reduction in adult smoking rates, probably more for youths. Those who continue to smoke would do so less. Hospitalizations would decline, as would health costs, much of which is paid by the public because so many city residents are uninsured or have government coverage.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Anna Edney, Bloomberg News
Fewer American teenagers and young adults are lighting up as cigarette taxes that have broken the $3-a-pack threshold in some states make smoking too costly, according to the latest National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Daily smoking, the leading cause of preventable illness and death in the United States, fell to 15.8 percent in 2010 among young adults 18 to 25, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration said in a report. That share was down from 20.4 percent in 2004.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Mayor Nutter talked about one of his Christmas wishes yesterday - reducing smoking rates in Philadelphia. Just in time for the holiday weekend, Nutter signed into law legislation that hikes the fines for merchants who sell tobacco products to minors. "We cannot allow our children to become the next generation of addicts," Nutter said. "Smoking is not cool at all. " The new law, approved by City Council several weeks ago, would raise the penalty for selling tobacco to minors from $100 to $250 per incident.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Backing a Nutter administration effort to reduce youth smoking, City Council yesterday passed legislation that hikes the fines for merchants who sell tobacco products to minors. The bill would raise the penalty from $100 to $250 per incident. Councilwoman Marian Tasco said she hoped that the move would be meaningful. "If Licenses & Inspections enforces it, it should have some impact," Tasco said. During hearings on the legislation several weeks ago, city Health Commissioner Donald Schwarz testified that a national survey, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shows that smoking rates among high-school youth in Philadelphia rank among the highest in the nation's big cities.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By JOSEPH P. KEARNEY
ALL OF US have an obligation to do all we can to ensure that kids don't smoke. Smoking is a risky adult behavior, and for reasons of addiction and health, it is particularly risky for underage youth. Without question, it is up to parents, the government, our schools, retail merchants and the tobacco industry to pursue policies and programs restricting youth access to tobacco products. While all of us share a responsibility, parents have a special responsibility to educate and talk to their kids about the risks and dangers associated with tobacco use. Pennsylvania is also taking a hands-on approach as an active participant, especially in the areas of enforcing laws that will impose fines and sanctions against retailers who sell tobacco products to minors.
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Young smokers, don't even try to plug 16 quarters into the cigarette machine at the Indian Chief Tavern on Route 70. It may look like an ordinary cigarette vending machine, the kind that does not require proof of age. But it is certifiably not. For there, next to a 46-stool bar, stands the latest in tobacco security: a remote-controlled dispenser that does not take money. The $4 for a pack goes to the cashier, who, after an opportunity to check ID, hits the remote control.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
"I buy my cigarettes every morning on the way to school," said Maria, 16, smiling and looking smart in a turtleneck sweater. "If you have your heart set on it, it's easy. " In fact, it was so easy, said Maria, who attends a private school in Lower Merion, that she no longer has to resort to using that fake ID she got in Chinatown. She said tobacco merchants rarely ask her for identification. Other teens said the same thing. "I can get cigarettes any time, anywhere," said Mike, 17, a senior at Lamberton High School in Overbrook Park who sports a ponytail and a ring in his eyebrow.
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a show of strength by moderates, the Senate rejected efforts yesterday to raise the tax on cigarettes by $1.50 per pack in its pending tobacco-control legislation. It also rejected a proposal to strike all taxes from the bill. Yesterday's vote means cigarette prices would rise by $1.10 per pack over five years, the amount originally set in the tobacco legislation being debated. After two days of give and take on the Senate floor, the bipartisan bill crafted by Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Tobacco may be under attack in Congress and in courthouses around the country. But it was as if the clock were turned back here yesterday at the Philip Morris annual stockholders meeting. Tobacco was celebrated, health activists were ridiculed, and the company's growth was cheered. Contending "there is nothing more we can do about youth smoking," Philip Morris CEO Geoffrey Bible called members of Congress "jokers" and rallied thousands of his company's shareholders around the cause of fighting the tobacco legislation of Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.
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