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Youth Smoking

NEWS
May 21, 1998 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a show of strength by moderates, the Senate rejected efforts yesterday to raise the tax on cigarettes by $1.50 per pack in its pending tobacco-control legislation. It also rejected a proposal to strike all taxes from the bill. Yesterday's vote means cigarette prices would rise by $1.10 per pack over five years, the amount originally set in the tobacco legislation being debated. After two days of give and take on the Senate floor, the bipartisan bill crafted by Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Tobacco may be under attack in Congress and in courthouses around the country. But it was as if the clock were turned back here yesterday at the Philip Morris annual stockholders meeting. Tobacco was celebrated, health activists were ridiculed, and the company's growth was cheered. Contending "there is nothing more we can do about youth smoking," Philip Morris CEO Geoffrey Bible called members of Congress "jokers" and rallied thousands of his company's shareholders around the cause of fighting the tobacco legislation of Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A surgeon general's report detailing a dramatic increase in the use of tobacco among young minorities touched off a new round of political sparring yesterday between the White House and the Republican leadership on Capitol Hill. President Clinton used the first-ever report on smoking by minority teenagers to ratchet up pressure on Congress to adopt legislation to curb underage smoking. But even as Clinton focused on the details of the problem, leading Republicans criticized him for not proposing specifics of a solution.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For years, a massive Kool cigarette billboard featuring a streaking racing car stood within eyeshot of the Poindexter Elementary School here. Now it is gone. On both sides of the Sonic Restaurant, the choice hangout of the teenagers of Greenville, were billboards for generic brands of cigarettes. Now there are antitobacco ads, courtesy of a state settlement with the tobacco industry. However, in the Eudora Welty Public Library, in Jackson, is an array of magazines full of cigarette ads. Walk a few more blocks to the Spur service station, and you can buy discounted cigarettes for as little as $1.19 a pack.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Smoking rates among teenagers continue to rise, the federal government reported yesterday, belying hopes that the youngest teens were finally getting the message. About 36 percent of teens in grades 9 through 12 smoked some tobacco product in the last month, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. When smokeless tobacco and cigars were included, the rate leaped to 42.7 percent. "It is terribly disheartening," said Gary Giovino, chief epidemiologist at the CDC. "But other than discussing it, there's not a lot that's been done.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a crackdown on juvenile smoking, the Township Council last night banned cigarette vending machines and made it illegal for minors to smoke in public. Medford Memorial Middle School students and a guidance counselor spoke in support of the laws, while several residents and two council members argued that the ban on juvenile smoking will infringe on juveniles' rights. The ban on cigarette vending machines passed unanimously. The law making it illegal for juveniles to smoke in public was approved by a 3-2 vote, with council members Judith Bennis and Martha Issod in opposition.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congress took a first step yesterday toward curbing America's tobacco habit as the Senate Commerce Committee voted 19-1 to pass legislation aimed at sharply cutting youth smoking and tightening regulation of cigarettes. The committee's bill would raise the price of a pack of cigarettes by $1.10 over five years, give the Food and Drug Administration broad power to control cigarette ingredients, restrict cigarette advertising, and cap the tobacco industry's annual legal damages at $6.5 billion.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the Senate prepared to shape a sweeping bill designed to sharply limit use of tobacco, there were signs yesterday that any law that emerges from Congress is likely to be disputed in bitter court battles. The tobacco companies said the draft bill proposed this week by Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) would drive them to bankruptcy and that to survive they would fight back with lawsuits. But opponents said the tobacco executives were exaggerating and the bill should be even harsher.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The tobacco industry's annual legal-liability fines would be limited to $6.5 billion under tough national tobacco-regulation legislation that a key Senate committee is poised to pass. After days of round-the-clock negotiations, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman John McCain (R., Ariz.) yesterday announced the bill, which contains terms far harsher than those the industry agreed to in a proposed settlement last year. The bill would cost tobacco companies up to $506 billion over 25 years, compared with $368.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Smoking in the township by anyone younger than 18 would be illegal under an ordinance introduced last night by a 3-2 vote. The two council members who opposed the measure called it a violation of juvenile rights. A second proposed ordinance, introduced by a unanimous vote, would prohibit cigarette vending machines, and give local police the power to prevent the sale of tobacco products to minors. Council's two Democratic members, Judith Bennis and Martha Issod, opposed the outright ban on juvenile smoking.
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