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Youth Smoking

NEWS
April 27, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For years, a massive Kool cigarette billboard featuring a streaking racing car stood within eyeshot of the Poindexter Elementary School here. Now it is gone. On both sides of the Sonic Restaurant, the choice hangout of the teenagers of Greenville, were billboards for generic brands of cigarettes. Now there are antitobacco ads, courtesy of a state settlement with the tobacco industry. However, in the Eudora Welty Public Library, in Jackson, is an array of magazines full of cigarette ads. Walk a few more blocks to the Spur service station, and you can buy discounted cigarettes for as little as $1.19 a pack.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Smoking rates among teenagers continue to rise, the federal government reported yesterday, belying hopes that the youngest teens were finally getting the message. About 36 percent of teens in grades 9 through 12 smoked some tobacco product in the last month, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. When smokeless tobacco and cigars were included, the rate leaped to 42.7 percent. "It is terribly disheartening," said Gary Giovino, chief epidemiologist at the CDC. "But other than discussing it, there's not a lot that's been done.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a crackdown on juvenile smoking, the Township Council last night banned cigarette vending machines and made it illegal for minors to smoke in public. Medford Memorial Middle School students and a guidance counselor spoke in support of the laws, while several residents and two council members argued that the ban on juvenile smoking will infringe on juveniles' rights. The ban on cigarette vending machines passed unanimously. The law making it illegal for juveniles to smoke in public was approved by a 3-2 vote, with council members Judith Bennis and Martha Issod in opposition.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congress took a first step yesterday toward curbing America's tobacco habit as the Senate Commerce Committee voted 19-1 to pass legislation aimed at sharply cutting youth smoking and tightening regulation of cigarettes. The committee's bill would raise the price of a pack of cigarettes by $1.10 over five years, give the Food and Drug Administration broad power to control cigarette ingredients, restrict cigarette advertising, and cap the tobacco industry's annual legal damages at $6.5 billion.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the Senate prepared to shape a sweeping bill designed to sharply limit use of tobacco, there were signs yesterday that any law that emerges from Congress is likely to be disputed in bitter court battles. The tobacco companies said the draft bill proposed this week by Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) would drive them to bankruptcy and that to survive they would fight back with lawsuits. But opponents said the tobacco executives were exaggerating and the bill should be even harsher.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The tobacco industry's annual legal-liability fines would be limited to $6.5 billion under tough national tobacco-regulation legislation that a key Senate committee is poised to pass. After days of round-the-clock negotiations, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman John McCain (R., Ariz.) yesterday announced the bill, which contains terms far harsher than those the industry agreed to in a proposed settlement last year. The bill would cost tobacco companies up to $506 billion over 25 years, compared with $368.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Smoking in the township by anyone younger than 18 would be illegal under an ordinance introduced last night by a 3-2 vote. The two council members who opposed the measure called it a violation of juvenile rights. A second proposed ordinance, introduced by a unanimous vote, would prohibit cigarette vending machines, and give local police the power to prevent the sale of tobacco products to minors. Council's two Democratic members, Judith Bennis and Martha Issod, opposed the outright ban on juvenile smoking.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Creating a "Cigarette-Free School Zone" seemed like a simple proposal at first: Minors caught using or possessing tobacco products within 1,000 feet of school property would be fined up to $500. But now, township officials are questioning whether their proposed tobacco regulations, originally billed as an extension of the school district's existing "Drug-Free School Zone," would include any public place in town. "What we portrayed and what we are passing aren't the same thing," council member Mike Muchowski said last week.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It should come as no surprise that President Clinton has opted to neither embrace nor condemn the so-called "global tobacco settlement. " It should shock nobody that the master of the bully pulpit has decided to speak softly, play for time, and hope that Capitol Hill takes the lead. Because, in political terms, this historic megabuck megadeal is everything he dreads. It's a hot potato that could burn a lot of powerful people, no matter what happens. It's a massive, divisive issue with no clear political payoff.
NEWS
July 31, 1997 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two prominent public-health leaders differed sharply yesterday on whether the proposed national settlement with the tobacco industry would save America's children or sell them out. In congressional testimony, Lonnie Bristow, who as president of the American Medical Association participated in the settlement talks, declared that this deal "has public-health opportunities which would potentially dwarf the impact of even the polio vaccine. " But John Seffrin, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society - which was not party to the talks - told the Senate Judiciary Committee that "this is not the right settlement" and that the deal contained "substantial" flaws.
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