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Youth Vote

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NEWS
January 19, 2007 | By BEN WAXMAN
SEN. BARACK OBAMA has officially formed an exploratory committee and plans to conduct listening tours across the country to determine if he should run for president. While Obama has a variety of supporters, there is no stronger group pulling for him than young people. Students and youth are extremely excited about his campaign and can provide critical support in the coming months. I attend a small liberal-arts college in rural Pennsylvania. I've been amazed at the number of students who ask me about Obama and can't wait for his campaign.
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The oldest president in U.S. history and the youngest members of the nation's electorate have forged one of the strongest bonds in American politics. Mindful of that, Ronald Reagan has started to court young people on a regular basis in the hope that his immense popularity with first-time voters can be transferred into a lasting allegiance to the Republican Party after he leaves the political scene. The Democratic Party has been the dominant political force in the country for the last 50 years, in part because it has consistently won over the largest share of new voters.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a very funky haircut, a cross between New Wave 1990s and Fabian 1950s, and somehow it belongs on top of Ben Zipkin's head. Just check out his list of heroes: "OK, Bob Guccione Jr., the editor of Spin magazine, and he never went to college or anything? And George Foreman. It's so great, how he made a boxing comeback, and he's got this diet where he eats hamburgers and fried chicken? And Simon Wiesenthal, who catches Nazis. And Lou Reed, because don't you think he's so deep?
NEWS
September 25, 1996 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Correspondent Nancy Petersen contributed to this report
In Chester County, one municipal supervisor owes his seat to a majority of one vote in the 1995 Republican primary. Now, educators and politicians there have joined forces to teach children that "every vote counts. " Kids Voting USA, a national program that made its local debut yesterday on the steps of the Chester County Courthouse, aims to inspire young people to take seriously the responsibility to vote. Chester is the first county in the state to participate in the national nonpartisan program, in which students go to the polls to "vote" with their parents in the Nov. 5 election.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six months after he was widely dismissed as a likely loser, Bill Clinton achieved something yesterday that other Democrats had only dreamed about for 12 years. He ripped a big hole in the Republican electoral coalition. He lured back the voters who had awarded the White House to Ronald Reagan and George Bush. During the 1980s, the GOP won three national elections with the help of these key constituencies: defiant Democrats, suburbanites and the young. But all three blocs swung heavily behind Clinton - who had sought, from the outset, to address the lagging hopes and nagging fears of middle-class Americans.
NEWS
November 4, 2004
YO, BRUCE Springsteen, Dave Matthews, Dixie Chicks and the rest of you leftist, commie, self-important blowhards: Go back to making bad music. Leave politics alone, no one cares about your predictable positions. In 2000, the youngest voters represented about 17 percent of the electorate. This year, the left came up with the idea to bankroll an anti-Bush concert tour headlined by you weirdos and to float draft-scare rumors to get out the "youth" vote for Kerry. The same 17 percent or so voted.
NEWS
October 9, 2008 | By DAVE DAVIES, daviesd@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
SEVERAL years back, Democratic consultant James Carville reportedly said, "Show me a candidate who depends on the youth vote, and I'll show you a loser. " Maybe this year is different. Many analysts expect a robust turnout among voters under 30 in the Nov. 4 presidential election, a development that clearly would favor Democrat Barack Obama. "Everything I see indicates we'll have a higher turnout than four years ago, when we saw a dramatic increase in voting among young people," said John Della Volpe, director of polling at Harvard University's Institute of Politics, which tracks youth-voting trends.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
They might as well be on different planets. For all the talk of the youth vote, the growing electoral power of Latinos, and the gender gap, demographers know that the sharpest divide in American politics lies between urban and rural areas. Downstate Illinois resents Chicago. Outstate Michigan hates Detroit. Upstate New York is none too fond of the city of the same name. Then there's Pennsylvania. Right now, the most powerful current feeding Harrisburg's gridlock on the budget, transportation funding, and Medicaid expansion may well be the fear and loathing many upstate lawmakers have of the state's largest city.
NEWS
November 22, 2005
Young voters were derided and dismissed immediately after the 2004 presidential election, but now there's proof the criticism was wrong. Exit polling a year ago indicated that about 9 percent of voters were between the ages of 18 and 24. About the same percentage of young voters cast ballots in 2000. So some pundits scoffed that all those "Vote or Die" campaigns in 2004 had failed to motivate young people to take elections seriously. Some blamed Democrat John Kerry's loss on the supposedly lackluster turnout of young people.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If T.I., Ciara and Flo-Rida - no, not the state - are not part of your lexicon, you probably were not the demographic targeted for yesterday's well-attended star-studded hip-hop summit in Philadelphia. Using music celebrities as a lure, organizers assembled a lineup of more than a dozen performers for the Philadelphia Hip-Hop Team Vote Summit, a nonpartisan effort to motivate young people to vote. And even though the event did not begin until 2 p.m., people got in line at Temple's Liacouras Center as early as 9:15 a.m. "This is all about getting the largest youth vote in history," said Benjamin Chavis, president and CEO of the Hip-Hop Research and Education Fund, one of the sponsors.
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NEWS
April 17, 2014
BELEAGUERED incumbent Republican Gov. Corbett hasn't, for some time now, had much to sing about. He's repeatedly ID'd as America's most vulnerable sitting governor. His polling numbers are consistently abysmal. And his communications efforts are almost always defensive - and I mean defensive like at the Alamo. But there might be a welcome tune in the piano hanging by a wire over his re-election prospects. And that tune, according to a new analysis of Pennsylvania voter turnout, could turn out to be music to Corbett's ears.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
They might as well be on different planets. For all the talk of the youth vote, the growing electoral power of Latinos, and the gender gap, demographers know that the sharpest divide in American politics lies between urban and rural areas. Downstate Illinois resents Chicago. Outstate Michigan hates Detroit. Upstate New York is none too fond of the city of the same name. Then there's Pennsylvania. Right now, the most powerful current feeding Harrisburg's gridlock on the budget, transportation funding, and Medicaid expansion may well be the fear and loathing many upstate lawmakers have of the state's largest city.
NEWS
November 6, 2012
WHEN AMERICA votes on Tuesday, one thing we know: The Latino vote will determine the winner.   I mean, the women's vote. That's for sure. The way independents break, that's the key. The youth vote! White males! Over the past few weeks, every possible subgroup (no lefthanded Albanian vampires?) took its turn in the spotlight as the victory linchpin for either President Obama or Gov. Mitt Romney. The media spin is like watching a dog chase his tail. On Tuesday, all the splinters will have their say in what is expected to be a close election by everyone except Democratic turncoat Dick Morris and whiteboard illustrator Karl Rove.
NEWS
September 16, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
A poll released yesterday revealed that young voters in Pennsylvania are engaged in the electoral process and optimistic, but pollsters and political analysts say that politicians don't appreciate their potential power. The survey of 1,000 voters ages 18 to 29, conducted nationwide in August, showed that young people are more concerned about candidates' views of the issues than about party identification. "We need candidates across the board to talk about the issues that young people care about," said Chrissy Faessen, vice president of communications and marketing for Rock the Vote, which conducted the poll.
NEWS
November 14, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
Political myths take hold as quickly as urban legends, and often with even less supporting evidence. Someone stands in a particularly long line on Election Day and decides that it signals a once-in-a-generation eruption of civic engagement. But anecdotes are not data. We now have enough exit-poll data from Edison Media Research/Mitofsky International to put last week's election in context. Let's examine some of the already established myths: An energized electorate produced a historic turnout.
NEWS
October 28, 2008 | By FATIMAH ALI
SO MANY people are chewing their nails as Election Day approaches. As our fragile economy hangs in the valance, we're now in a prime position to fix our broken society - and our global reputation, which has been on the decline for awhile. But whether the rest of the world likes us or not, they're watching closely to see if we're finally brave enough to take a whole new direction. If the rest of the world were allowed to vote for our president, Barack Obama would probably win by a landslide.
NEWS
October 9, 2008 | By DAVE DAVIES, daviesd@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
SEVERAL years back, Democratic consultant James Carville reportedly said, "Show me a candidate who depends on the youth vote, and I'll show you a loser. " Maybe this year is different. Many analysts expect a robust turnout among voters under 30 in the Nov. 4 presidential election, a development that clearly would favor Democrat Barack Obama. "Everything I see indicates we'll have a higher turnout than four years ago, when we saw a dramatic increase in voting among young people," said John Della Volpe, director of polling at Harvard University's Institute of Politics, which tracks youth-voting trends.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If T.I., Ciara and Flo-Rida - no, not the state - are not part of your lexicon, you probably were not the demographic targeted for yesterday's well-attended star-studded hip-hop summit in Philadelphia. Using music celebrities as a lure, organizers assembled a lineup of more than a dozen performers for the Philadelphia Hip-Hop Team Vote Summit, a nonpartisan effort to motivate young people to vote. And even though the event did not begin until 2 p.m., people got in line at Temple's Liacouras Center as early as 9:15 a.m. "This is all about getting the largest youth vote in history," said Benjamin Chavis, president and CEO of the Hip-Hop Research and Education Fund, one of the sponsors.
NEWS
April 2, 2008 | By Hayley Richardson
Barack Obama likes to say that his campaign isn't about him, and in many ways, this story isn't either. At 23, I'm still naive enough to believe that one politician can transform the world, and I have no trouble putting my hopes in an admittedly imperfect vessel. But I'm also practical enough to recognize that this time around it has to be about us. Who is us? We're the technology-addicted, perpetually in motion twenty-something wunderkinder that you're probably tired of hearing about.
NEWS
January 19, 2007 | By BEN WAXMAN
SEN. BARACK OBAMA has officially formed an exploratory committee and plans to conduct listening tours across the country to determine if he should run for president. While Obama has a variety of supporters, there is no stronger group pulling for him than young people. Students and youth are extremely excited about his campaign and can provide critical support in the coming months. I attend a small liberal-arts college in rural Pennsylvania. I've been amazed at the number of students who ask me about Obama and can't wait for his campaign.
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