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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | BY MICHAEL CIDONI LENNOX, Associated Press
    LOS ANGELES - He's a musician without a record label, a cardholder without any remaining credit. And the gig that supplies what he calls "food money" may now be in jeopardy. But after the events of the last week, Steve Grand said, "I would die a happy man today. "Grand's first music video, for his country-tinged rock ballad "All-American Boy," was posted on YouTube last Tuesday. By Sunday, it had exploded, attracting more than 400,000 total views - nothing for top-charting videos from big-name recording artists, but an impressive figure for one from a complete unknown whose only promotion has been Internet buzz.
NEWS
August 28, 2010 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's become as routine as dirty boots in a battle zone and as entertaining as a USO show? The answer's all over YouTube, as troops performing choreographed dance numbers - not exactly with military precision - and lip-synching to mega hits have transformed desert bases into music-video sets. A remake of Lady Gaga's "Telephone" by soldiers from the 82d Airborne Division stationed in Afghanistan has been viewed more than six million times since it was uploaded in April. Troops in Iraq made news in May when they posted (and quickly took down)
NEWS
November 17, 2007 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigators searching for leads in last month's beating death of a Rowan University sophomore are trying a new approach: YouTube. They submitted a 30-second clip to the popular video Web site yesterday of a suspect in the killing of Donald Farrell, who was beaten during a campus robbery Oct. 27. "Since the suspect and his companions have been described as young males, we thought it could be helpful in identifying the individual captured on...
NEWS
August 14, 2008 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A West Philadelphia man, arrested after he was seen on a Web site waving a handgun and exhorting viewers to shoot at the city's police officers, pleaded guilty yesterday before a Common Pleas Court judge. Andre Moore, 44, pleaded guilty to one count each of making terroristic threats, harassment, and corrupting the morals of a minor. Moore, of the 4800 block of Walnut Street, posted a video clip June 7 on YouTube.com. Titled "Dissin' Philly Cops," the clip featured Moore brandishing a silvery semiautomatic pistol while delivering a rant.
NEWS
June 28, 2010 | By Lisa M. Krieger, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
SAN JOSE, Calif. - From a tiny closet in Mountain View, Calif., Sal Khan is educating the globe for free. His 1,516 videotaped mini-lectures - on topics ranging from simple addition to vector calculus and Napoleonic campaigns - are transforming the former hedge fund analyst into a YouTube sensation, reaping praise from even reluctant students across the world. "I'm starting a virtual school for the world, teaching things the way I wanted to be taught," explains Khan, 33, the exuberant founder and sole faculty member of the nonprofit Khan Academy, run out of his small ranch house, which he shares with his wife and infant son. Khan has never studied education and has no teaching credentials.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
FROM A decorated police lieutenant caught cold-cocking an unarmed woman to a wild wedding brawl captured on camera by a 15-year-old tourist, Philly videos scored big numbers at the YouTube box office in 2012. If seeing is believing, even veteran lawmen were shocked when they saw a little girl fight off her abductor and, in another video, a group of teen girls attack a mentally challenged woman in her own home. The viewing material ventured into R-rated territory when cameras caught a cabbie with his pants down and a chanting family at a suburban high school with no pants at all. Perhaps, in some quiet, bizarre corners of southeastern Pennsylvania (ahem . . . Delco)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
JAMEEL SALEEM wasn't getting the types of parts he wanted when he and his girlfriend moved to Los Angeles to make it big. Saleem rattled off a list: gang banger, parolee, ghost rapper. How could he turn down ghost rapper? "It wasn't a comedy," Saleem said. But instead of waiting around for the right part, Saleem, who spent his early years in Germantown, followed in the footsteps of his hero Woody Allen: He wrote his own material, enlisted girlfriend Kimelia Weathers, picked up a camera and shot a series of YouTube videos.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
FOUND A RECENT posting on one of Greyson Chance's Internet fan sites. Came from a young girl who was "thrilled" that his first single ("Waiting Outside the Lines") had "finally" been released, because she'd been "waiting so long" for it. Well, I guess if you're barely out of single digits, 10 months is an eternity. That's how long (and short) it's taken for 13-year-old Chance to go from middle-school nobody in Edmond, Okla., to the next big thing in pubescent pop-rock, with a No. 1 single, an unbelievable 32 million (and counting)
BUSINESS
November 28, 2009 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On West Lancaster Avenue in Wayne, local businessman Robert Lail runs what he calls "YouTube for business. " "Most people don't know how big the corporate video market is," said Lail, who sold corporate training videos in the 1970s and 1980s before launching a telemarketing firm, MarketMakers, for technical products. "I think it's bigger than traditional media. There are 13 million companies out there. Some of those companies have their own TV studios. " With that in mind, Lail developed eCorpTV.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
The film opens with a shot of a crowded Unionville High School stairwell. Muscled football and lacrosse players complain to the camera about the cramped size of the gym, and a girl from the field hockey team lists the advantages of replacing grass fields with artificial turf. A science teacher laments the lack of ventilation or eyewash stations in his lab, and the dearth of SMART boards. An art teacher points out that his room has a paper-towel dispenser for hand-drying, but no sink for hand-washing.
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