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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
I watch classic films like High Society , Breakfast at Tiffany's , and Mahogany repeatedly - not so much for the story lines, but because I get a kick out of seeing Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn, and Diana Ross dressed exquisitely in the fashions of their eras. This is why I always get lured into clicking on Mode Studios' historically haute "100 Years" videos, quick-paced series of two- to three-minute mini-movies that chronicle men's and women's fashion over the decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
LIKE MANY from the region who left to attend college outside of the area, Sean Monahan had the "wooder" teased out of him. While attending the College of Wooster in Ohio, his newfound friends poked fun at his Philly accent. "I knew that the vocabulary was different. I say 'hoe-gies,' and not a lot of others say 'hoe-gies,' " said Monahan, who grew up in Bensalem and Langhorne and now resides in the Southwark section of Philadelphia. It's not that Monahan hadn't noticed his accent before.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The night of Hurricane Sandy brought heartening stories of the power of social media to connect and inform. In social media terms, Sandy is without a doubt the most-covered storm, in depth, breadth, and detail, in history. On Aug. 30, 2005, when Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, Facebook was a toddler of a year and a half, YouTube a babe of six months, and Twitter nonexistent. Most tweets, posts, and videos sought to help people, both those in storm's way and those wanting to know more.
SPORTS
December 13, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Philadelphia Inquirer
When Steve Markle was 14, he begged for a pool table. His dad was leery. Would he really use it? Would it just end up a storage table for laundry and junk? But NOT getting a pool table was becoming a problem. "Steve was obsessed," said older brother Bill. "He wanted to go to bars because he knew they had a pool table. " Dad bought a Kmart table. Steve was in the basement all the time, banging balls. He broke 15 floor tiles, the computer screen, picture frames.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO - A morbidly obese California man whose tearful, videotaped plea for help became a YouTube sensation may be getting the support he wanted. The "Dr. Phil" show reached out to Livermore resident Robert Gibbs, 23, after he posted his three-minute video last week. Gibbs mentioned the program in his clip, which has been viewed more than a million times and inspired dozens of responses from viewers offering diet tips and encouragement. A crew from the "Dr. Phil" show was scheduled to come to his house and film him today, Gibbs told the Associated Press.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
VIDEO of a Philadelphia police supervisor striking a woman during a Puerto Rican Day Parade celebration was posted to YouTube on Sunday night. Go to phillyconfidential.com to see the video. In these still shots from the video, Lt. Jonathan Josey II, in white shirt, punches Aida Guzman in the face (far left photo), then handcuffs her while she is sitting on the ground, blood pouring from her face (left); then Guzman is led away by another cop (above).
NEWS
May 24, 2013
Zach Sobiech, 18, a Minnesota teen whose farewell song became a YouTube sensation, has died after a 31/2-year fight with bone cancer. Mr. Sobiech died Monday at his Lakeland home. His mother, Laura, said on the CaringBridge website that he was surrounded by his family and girlfriend. He was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in November 2009. When he learned last year that he did not have much longer to live, his mother suggested he write farewell notes to his loved ones. Instead, he wrote music.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2006 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. entered the world of lip-synching teens, spewing Coke bottles, and letter-opening rabbits yesterday as the company started testing a Web site featuring home videos. YouTube.com popularized user-created Internet video, but Comcast's service will offer the tantalizing possibility of a real television audience. Comcast - the nation's biggest provider of broadband Internet and cable TV - will select some videos to feature on both the Web and on the company's video-on-demand television service, providing a mix between YouTube and America's Funniest Home Videos, according to people familiar with the site.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are rules. If you share your deepest personal secrets with thousands of strangers on the Web, you can't talk. You can smile, wave, play background music. You can even make a two-handed "heart" sign. But talk? No. If you're making a "secrets video" for posting on YouTube or Tumblr - as hundreds of young people, predominantly women, are doing - you must write your secrets out in flash-card fashion. You hold each card or paper up so your audience of strangers can read.
SPORTS
November 26, 2006 | By Don Steinberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wide Tube of Sports There's no all-sports version of YouTube, the insanely popular Web site where regular people send in amateur video clips for the world to watch. But a few sports sites are tinkering in the weird world of "user-generated content. " Rivals.com has a site called TailgateTV (tailgatetv.rivals.com) that allows college football fans to upload videos and photos from tailgate parties. Fans are forbidden from posting anything inappropriate - or, more important, any images from games.
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