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August 4, 2004 | Yevgenia M. Albats
Yevgenia M. Albats is a professor of political science at the Moscow Higher School of Economics The high-profile Yukos affair, which pits the Russian state against Yukos, the nation's second-largest oil company, and its owner, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Russia's richest man, unites people on both sides of the ocean at least in one respect: Policymakers and businessmen in Europe and across the Atlantic are equally clueless about...
BUSINESS
August 6, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Oil prices zoomed to new highs yesterday as fears of a potential loss in supply from Russia returned, rattling global markets at a time of strong worldwide demand for oil. Crude futures for September delivery surged by $1.58 a barrel to close at $44.41 on the New York Mercantile Exchange. "The high price of oil is having a big effect on the economy," said Lynn Reaser, chief economist at Banc of America Capital Management in St. Louis. "Wal-Mart and other retailers are saying that the high price of gasoline has impacted consumer spending.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2003 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The startling arrest of Russia's wealthiest man - a pro-American oil baron who has openly defied the Kremlin with his financing of opposition political parties - caused stock markets to plunge so far and so fast yesterday that trading was temporarily halted. "The arrest of Mikhail Khodorkovsky has resulted in a landslide bigger than that of the American stock market after Sept. 11," said Alexander Shokhin, president of the Higher School of Economics and a member of the Duma, the Russian parliament.
NEWS
November 2, 2003 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Friday was, by some measures, a good day: The sun was shining, the stock market was up, and Russian President Vladimir V. Putin had just passed over his old KGB buddies to name a moderate former law professor as his chief of staff. The government even agreed to unfreeze some of the shares it seized Thursday when it took control of Yukos, Russia's biggest company and the world's fourth-largest oil producer. But billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the head of Yukos and Russia's wealthiest man, remained in jail on suspicion of fraud, embezzlement and tax evasion.
NEWS
October 31, 2003 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
In an escalation of its battle with Russia's business elite, the government seized control of oil giant Yukos yesterday, freezing a large block of shares in the world's fourth-largest petroleum producer. Prosecutors said most of the shares were owned by Yukos' chairman, billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky, 40, who was arrested Saturday and charged with fraud, forgery, embezzlement and tax evasion. Critics say the arrest of Khodorkovsky, who has financially supported parties that oppose President Vladimir V. Putin, was politically motivated.
NEWS
January 10, 2005 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
When Russian President Vladimir V. Putin recently booted one of his top advisers out of a key post, many Kremlin-watchers thought the man probably had it coming. After all, liberal economist Andrei Illarionov had used the indelicate phrase "scam of the year" to describe the government's gutting of oil giant Yukos. He also had ridiculed the Kremlin's bungled interventions in the recent Ukrainian presidential election. But Putin's demotion of Illarionov from his inner circle was far more than a wrist slap or personnel shuffle, analysts said.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | Freelance
Pavel Khodorkovsky is the son of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, former Yukos chief and an Amnesty International prisoner of conscience, and is also president of the Institute of Modern Russia Scanning the Father's Day aisle at the local card store, I see quickly how hard it will be to pick out something fitting. My father isn't a golfer, and he isn't known for his prowess on the football field or interest in home-improvement projects. There is no card that says "Happy Father's Day … from the Outside.
NEWS
June 1, 2005 | Daily News wire services
Jailed witches, Satanists have rights, justices rule The Supreme Court sided with a witch, a Satanist and a racial separatist yesterday, upholding a federal law requiring state prisons to accommodate the religious affiliations of inmates. The three Ohio prisoners and others sued under the 2000 federal law, claiming they were denied access to religious literature and ceremonial items and denied time to worship. The law says states that get federal tax dollars must accommodate prisoners' religious beliefs, with such things as special haircuts or meals.
NEWS
January 28, 2004 | By Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell sought yesterday to reassure Russia that U.S. plans to establish bases in former Soviet states were not intended as a threat. The Bush administration's developing blueprint to redeploy U.S. troops in Europe and establish bases in Eastern Europe, and possibly in former Soviet republics, has sparked alarm in Russia and renewed fears of being surrounded. Russian Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said two weeks ago that "any relocation of the military infrastructure of the NATO bloc closer to our borders can only evoke a reaction and cause appropriate concern.
NEWS
March 8, 2006 | By Trudy Rubin
Deep in the bowels of Siberia, in a grim penal colony where the winter temperatures reach 40 degrees below zero, a man who was once one of Russia's richest tycoons and head of its largest oil company is now serving an eight-year sentence. The fate of Mikhail Khodorkovsky symbolizes Russia's slide from semidemocracy back toward authoritarianism and the deterioration of U.S.-Russian relations. To understand what must be done to reshape those relations, it helps to look at the case of the imprisoned tycoon.
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NEWS
June 17, 2012 | Freelance
Pavel Khodorkovsky is the son of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, former Yukos chief and an Amnesty International prisoner of conscience, and is also president of the Institute of Modern Russia Scanning the Father's Day aisle at the local card store, I see quickly how hard it will be to pick out something fitting. My father isn't a golfer, and he isn't known for his prowess on the football field or interest in home-improvement projects. There is no card that says "Happy Father's Day … from the Outside.
NEWS
March 8, 2006 | By Trudy Rubin
Deep in the bowels of Siberia, in a grim penal colony where the winter temperatures reach 40 degrees below zero, a man who was once one of Russia's richest tycoons and head of its largest oil company is now serving an eight-year sentence. The fate of Mikhail Khodorkovsky symbolizes Russia's slide from semidemocracy back toward authoritarianism and the deterioration of U.S.-Russian relations. To understand what must be done to reshape those relations, it helps to look at the case of the imprisoned tycoon.
NEWS
June 1, 2005 | Daily News wire services
Jailed witches, Satanists have rights, justices rule The Supreme Court sided with a witch, a Satanist and a racial separatist yesterday, upholding a federal law requiring state prisons to accommodate the religious affiliations of inmates. The three Ohio prisoners and others sued under the 2000 federal law, claiming they were denied access to religious literature and ceremonial items and denied time to worship. The law says states that get federal tax dollars must accommodate prisoners' religious beliefs, with such things as special haircuts or meals.
NEWS
January 10, 2005 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
When Russian President Vladimir V. Putin recently booted one of his top advisers out of a key post, many Kremlin-watchers thought the man probably had it coming. After all, liberal economist Andrei Illarionov had used the indelicate phrase "scam of the year" to describe the government's gutting of oil giant Yukos. He also had ridiculed the Kremlin's bungled interventions in the recent Ukrainian presidential election. But Putin's demotion of Illarionov from his inner circle was far more than a wrist slap or personnel shuffle, analysts said.
NEWS
December 21, 2004 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Russia's auctioning of the heart of the Yukos empire is reminiscent of the country's notorious privatizations of the 1990s, analysts said yesterday, as the oil company's former chief executive officer offered bitter season's greetings to the Kremlin from his courtroom cage. "The authorities have given themselves a wonderful Christmas present," said Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the jailed founder of the business that had been considered the most transparent of all Russian companies. In Washington, a State Department spokesman said the sale of the oil company to a mystery buyer in a forced auction further erodes confidence in Russia's legal institutions.
NEWS
December 20, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A largely unknown company won an auction yesterday of the main production unit of one of Russia's largest oil producers, Yukos. Baikal Finance Group bid $9.4 billion, winning the government's forced sale of Yuganskneftegaz. It was not known how the buyer had financing for the deal, and several analysts suggested the company might be nothing more than a quickly formed front for Gazprom, the state-owned natural-gas conglomerate that had been the expected high bidder. Gazprom denied any links.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The Russian government, dismissing a restraining order issued by a U.S. court in Houston, vowed yesterday to press ahead with tomorrow's auction of a prize piece of Yukos, Russia's largest oil company. The government has filed tax claims of more than $25 billion against Yukos, and the embattled company can't pay. To help satisfy the tax bill, the Kremlin is auctioning off Yuganskneftegaz, the main oil-pumping division of Yukos. The forced sale of Yugansk could be the death knell for Yukos, part of the endgame in the government's politically motivated dismantling of the once-mighty oil giant.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Oil prices zoomed to new highs yesterday as fears of a potential loss in supply from Russia returned, rattling global markets at a time of strong worldwide demand for oil. Crude futures for September delivery surged by $1.58 a barrel to close at $44.41 on the New York Mercantile Exchange. "The high price of oil is having a big effect on the economy," said Lynn Reaser, chief economist at Banc of America Capital Management in St. Louis. "Wal-Mart and other retailers are saying that the high price of gasoline has impacted consumer spending.
NEWS
August 4, 2004 | Yevgenia M. Albats
Yevgenia M. Albats is a professor of political science at the Moscow Higher School of Economics The high-profile Yukos affair, which pits the Russian state against Yukos, the nation's second-largest oil company, and its owner, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Russia's richest man, unites people on both sides of the ocean at least in one respect: Policymakers and businessmen in Europe and across the Atlantic are equally clueless about...
NEWS
January 28, 2004 | By Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell sought yesterday to reassure Russia that U.S. plans to establish bases in former Soviet states were not intended as a threat. The Bush administration's developing blueprint to redeploy U.S. troops in Europe and establish bases in Eastern Europe, and possibly in former Soviet republics, has sparked alarm in Russia and renewed fears of being surrounded. Russian Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said two weeks ago that "any relocation of the military infrastructure of the NATO bloc closer to our borders can only evoke a reaction and cause appropriate concern.
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