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NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Jill Morrison, Special to The Inquirer
Despite numerous calls from Newtown parents wanting to help bail out the Community Center, the recently closed facility has run dry of money and is not expected to reopen, officials said. "The support is great," said Susan McCarthy, president of the center's board of directors. But the center needs more than "just a dollar here or a dollar there. People don't understand the grave financial situation we're in. " McCarthy, in an interview, declined to specify the center's financial situation.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Bucks County Association for Retarded Citizens (BARC) will honor local businesses, organizations and individuals who aided the organization last year in its effort to serve mentally retarded individuals and their families. At a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. next Thursday at BARC Productions Services in Warminster, the following will be recognized for their financial support, professional services or fund-raising efforts: Ametek-U.S. Gauge, Quakertown; the Bristol Exchange Club, Bristol Township; Bucks County Bank; Coyne Chemical Co., Croydon; Michael Dougherty, Warrington; Lindsay Miller, Southampton; Rose Pantess, Columbus, N.J.; Dr. Robert Roberts, Quakertown; Donna Tabatabi, Lahaska Flower Shoppe, Warminster, and Wendy Whitaker, Lambertville Station, N.J. Friends and neighbors are invited to attend the reception.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
He is only 5 years old, and when he talks to his mommy on the phone, he cradles the receiver, gives it a hug with his little arms, and says, "I send you hugs. I send you kisses. " And his grandma's heart breaks. The little boy's mother went to prison in September. She'll be locked up on Christmas morning. And next year's Christmas, and the next - unless her appeal prevails in the courts. Her sons, ages 5, 8 and 9, and her 16-year-old daughter are in the loving care of their grandmother, Betty.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Recognizing the growing membership in the suburbs, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce has created the position of suburban government affairs officer, in addition to forming a regional affairs department. The chamber has appointed David Mashek to the new position. He is responsible for monitoring business-related measures in Bucks, Montgomery, Delaware and Chester Counties. "In this position I'll be working with the membership within the suburban counties so that county commissioners are aware of business interests in making their decisions," said Mashek, who has been with the chamber since 1987.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The Frankford YWCA, which fought financial ailments for years because of the mother organization's bankruptcy, is ready to make a full recovery. But it will need a $175,000 dose of donations over the next 10 months to remain on its feet. The money is needed to pay off the Frankford branch's portion of the debt owed by the YWCA of Philadelphia, and establish the neighborhood branch as an independent entity, said branch administrator Connie DeLury. The Frankford Y, at Arrott and Leiper streets, also is seeking $50,000 more over the next 12 months to renovate its fitness club, locker rooms and other parts of the building, she said.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Coatesville City Council last week gave preliminary approval to an ordinance that will establish a mandatory recycling program within the city. Under the program, which the state mandated last year in communities of more than 5,000, residents will be required to separate and bring to curbside colored glass, clear glass, aluminum cans and newspapers. The ordinance requires residents to empty, clean and separate the clear- and colored-glass containers. It also requires that newspapers be tied or placed in paper bags and be kept dry for pickup.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A local group known as Women FREE (Women for Racial Equality and Empowerment) held its first organizational meeting Monday at the YWCA of Greater West Chester. The organization is aimed at eliminating sexism and racism and will meet later this summer to discuss implementing a plan of action in the community, according to the group's founder Andrea Fishman. The first meeting was attended by 38 women, both black and white, ranging from university professors and high school teachers to heads of local women's organizations and church groups.
NEWS
March 9, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Germantown YWCA building has been put up for sheriff's sale by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, to recoup $1.3 million lent to a Germantown nonprofit group to buy the property. The move follows a January decision by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to foreclose on two low-income housing projects for the elderly that the nonprofit Germantown Settlement had built with federal and local funds. The Redevelopment Authority foreclosed on the YWCA because Germantown Settlement had failed to make any payments on its loan since the purchase in 2006.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dressing someone else for success is what about 200 local businesswomen did this week. Jackets, dresses, skirts, blouses and shoes were carried on hangers and in bags into King's Caterers II on Monday morning. The businesswomen were attending a "Breakfast by Women for Women" sponsored by the YWCA of Bucks County. Besides donating an article of clothing that a woman might wear to a job interview, they each paid $20 to attend the breakfast. Proceeds from the event will benefit the new women's centers opened by the YWCA in Bensalem at the 1,043-unit Creekside Apartments and at the 350-unit Country Commons Apartments.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As summer approaches, a certain panic sets in among some parents. How will the children stay occupied for all those long, hot days? What will keep them away from the television set and untouched by the neighborhood bullies? For many, camp is the solution. And in the Philadelphia area, and specifically Bucks County, there are plenty of them to choose from: day camps, overnight camps, specialty camps, YMCA camps, religious camps and more. To help sort out some of the options, a new organization called the Pennsylvania Day Camp Association formed last year.
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