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Zagreb

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NEWS
May 15, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Russian Revolution (circa 1917) and the brewing Yugoslavian Revolution (circa 1991) now have one thing in common: Omar Sharif. He made his name in a film about the Russian affair and he may have arrived here just in time for the outbreak of the Yugoslavian version. Some say the trouble may start today. Some say by the end of the week. Some say in a few weeks. And - if civil war does tear Yugoslavia apart - there won't be a director around to holler "cut" when dinnertime rolls around.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Serb-launched bombs slammed again yesterday into this stunned capital city, leaving a trail of blood, shattered glass and panic and sending diplomats scrambling to avert a full-scale war. One policeman was killed as he tried to deactivate a bomb that landed in the courtyard of a children's hospital. Forty-four civilians were injured, many of them dancers from the Vienna-based Danube Ballet Company, in other explosions that rocked a ballet studio next to the National Theater. Hours after the attacks, U.N. special envoy Yasushi Akashi announced that the rebel Croatian Serbs had agreed to a truce, effective 4 p.m. yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Winning a grant to arrange performances in Zagreb may sound like copping fourth prize, but to composer David Hahn it is a chance to build musical bridges. Hahn, a Philadelphia native now living and teaching in Seattle, left last week for the Croatian capital of Zagreb to prepare concerts of his music with local musicians. He is a winner of an ArtsLink Collaborative Grant designed to bring American musicians together with artists from Eastern Europe and Russia. "Actually, I've spent several summers there," Hahn said.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the very day that 15-year-old Marina Sprajc headed back to Yugoslavia, a bomb blast ripped through the Jewish community center in her native Zagreb. The explosion last month shook Zagreb's small but resilient Jewish population. A tremor also was felt as far away as Cherry Hill and Voorhees, where Sprajc and seven other Jewish teenagers had just spent an idyllic suburban summer as guests of local Jewish families. Sprajc is back in South Jersey, joined by a dozen other teenagers from Zagreb, the capital of the Croatian republic.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jadranka Fischer, 65, of Devon, who worked to increase awareness of the war in her native Croatia during the 1990s and raised money to support about 10 Croatian children orphaned during the war, died of lung cancer Tuesday, Sept. 11, at Paoli Hospital. Mrs. Fischer was the wife of Raoul Fischer, a retired marketing executive with Unisys Corp. in Blue Bell. In 1992, an exhibition of photographs from the Croatian war organized by Mrs. Fischer was displayed in Washington and Philadelphia, her husband said.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
In a well-meaning op-ed piece for the New York Times, Balkans specialist Robert Kaplan suggests Pope John Paul II has a role to play in Yugoslavia. Perish the thought. Flight time from Vatican City to Zagreb is no more than it is from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, but the most logical papal imperative for the current internecine strife in Yugoslavia can be stated in just two words. Stay away. If the pope must indulge his voracious yen for travel and practice his particular brand of statesmanship at the same time, he could fly down to Baghdad and try talking some sense into Iraqi tyrant Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Damir Vandelic should be at home, finishing his last year of college. Instead, for 47 days, the mechanical-engineering student has been a prisoner of war, held by the ethnic Serbian territorial forces here. His only contact with the outside world was one telephone call a month ago to his fiancee. He wept last week as he recalled her voice. "This is really and truly a confused situation," said Vandelic, a 23- year-old Croat. "I was the best student at the university last year, but I can't understand this war. We have the same language, we have similar culture.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
The opposing sides in Yugoslavia's civil war agreed to yet another cease- fire yesterday, but the effort was marred by continuing reports of scattered violence around Croatia, where more than 500 people have been killed in the last three months. Fighting continued right up until the start of the cease-fire, at 3 p.m. local time, and each side accused the other of violations afterward. Yet there was a glimmer of hope the cease-fire might hold even though several earlier ones had failed.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Mirna Herman recently called her father in Croatia, she could barely hear his voice. The bombs were too loud. Separated for months from family and friends in her home town of Osijek, Herman, 15, had been trying to get through for two days. She was calling from her temporary home in Moorestown, where she has been living in secure, comfortable surroundings with a host family, far from the dangers of her country's civil war. In a few weeks, Mirna Herman and more than 20 other Croatian students who have been living with families in South Jersey since last fall will leave behind the American teenage world of classes and proms and shopping malls.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Martin L. Dryer, 51, a South Jersey business consultant who helped arrange for more than 30 Croatian teenagers to come and stay in the Cherry Hill area at the height of the civil war in Yugoslavia, died Monday at his Gloucester Township home. The cause of death is undetermined pending the completion of an investigation by the Camden County Medical Examiner's Office. Born in London, he lived in Cherry Hill before moving to Gloucester Township a year and a half ago. Mr. Dryer worked in management for casinos in London from 1973 to 1978 and then in Atlantic City from 1978 until 1986.
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TRAVEL
July 22, 2013 | By Amy Laughinghouse, For The Inquirer
Since Croatia joined the European Union on July 1, this erstwhile slice of Yugoslavia is ready for its close-up. When many North Americans think of Croatia, if they think of it at all, they still picture it as battle-scarred. Yet the Croatian War of Independence, which saw Croats face off against Serb-led forces, was 20 years ago. Having achieved sovereignty and returned to peace, Croatia is emerging as a hotspot for tourists eager to discover its stunning Dalmatian Coast and museum-packed capital before the rest of the world arrives.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jadranka Fischer, 65, of Devon, who worked to increase awareness of the war in her native Croatia during the 1990s and raised money to support about 10 Croatian children orphaned during the war, died of lung cancer Tuesday, Sept. 11, at Paoli Hospital. Mrs. Fischer was the wife of Raoul Fischer, a retired marketing executive with Unisys Corp. in Blue Bell. In 1992, an exhibition of photographs from the Croatian war organized by Mrs. Fischer was displayed in Washington and Philadelphia, her husband said.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Martin L. Dryer, 51, a South Jersey business consultant who helped arrange for more than 30 Croatian teenagers to come and stay in the Cherry Hill area at the height of the civil war in Yugoslavia, died Monday at his Gloucester Township home. The cause of death is undetermined pending the completion of an investigation by the Camden County Medical Examiner's Office. Born in London, he lived in Cherry Hill before moving to Gloucester Township a year and a half ago. Mr. Dryer worked in management for casinos in London from 1973 to 1978 and then in Atlantic City from 1978 until 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Winning a grant to arrange performances in Zagreb may sound like copping fourth prize, but to composer David Hahn it is a chance to build musical bridges. Hahn, a Philadelphia native now living and teaching in Seattle, left last week for the Croatian capital of Zagreb to prepare concerts of his music with local musicians. He is a winner of an ArtsLink Collaborative Grant designed to bring American musicians together with artists from Eastern Europe and Russia. "Actually, I've spent several summers there," Hahn said.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rejecting a last-ditch call for peace by the United States and United Nations, Croatian troops early this morning launched a long-anticipated offensive aimed at recapturing a large part of Croatia that has been held by rebel Serbs. At 4 a.m. local time, the United Nations received a courtesy call from the Croats to inform them of the launch of the offensive, according to an adviser to U.S. special envoy Yashushi Akashi. Less than an hour later, between 200 and 300 shells exploded around Knin, where the rebel Serbs have installed their capital.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from The Associated Press
To the chagrin of U.N. negotiators who had proudly announced a cease-fire just the day before, fighting raged on east of the capital yesterday and brought Croatia ever closer to all-out war. Peace talks that had been scheduled today in Geneva were canceled late yesterday after the burst of renewed violence. "It has not been a very good day," conceded Chris Gunness, a U.N. spokesman here. Although the Croatian capital was spared more of the bombings that took six lives and caused 200 casualties earlier in the week, fierce artillery battles erupted in Pakrac, to the east near the Bosnia border.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Serb-launched bombs slammed again yesterday into this stunned capital city, leaving a trail of blood, shattered glass and panic and sending diplomats scrambling to avert a full-scale war. One policeman was killed as he tried to deactivate a bomb that landed in the courtyard of a children's hospital. Forty-four civilians were injured, many of them dancers from the Vienna-based Danube Ballet Company, in other explosions that rocked a ballet studio next to the National Theater. Hours after the attacks, U.N. special envoy Yasushi Akashi announced that the rebel Croatian Serbs had agreed to a truce, effective 4 p.m. yesterday.
NEWS
March 29, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The way the doctors tell it, it was a typical medical school interview. Two physicians, referring to the applicant's records, questioned the candidate on everything from why he wants to be a doctor to what he likes to do for fun. They observed his body language to see how he would interact with patients. But there was one major difference. Lt. Peter Campanella was seven time zones and several thousand miles away in Zagreb, Croatia, yesterday as he went through his interview for admission to the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford.
NEWS
April 4, 1994 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As recently as January, Croatian President Franjo Tudjman looked as if he might soon find himself in the company of international pariahs, right next to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic. Economic sanctions against Croatia seemed imminent as a result of the escalating violence in Bosnia. Criticism was mounting about neo-Nazi sentiments in Croatia. But last week, Madeleine Albright, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, fairly gushed about the 71-year-old Tudjman during a news conference at the Zagreb airport.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
While national attention focused on the bomb blast at the World Trade Center, there were bombing incidents in at least three foreign capitals. In Egypt, four men, including two foreigners, were killed and 16 wounded in a bomb explosion that ripped through a crowded coffee shop in central Cairo on Friday night. Muslim extremists who have targeted tourists before claimed responsibility yesterday. There was no immediate indication who might have been responsible, although security sources said police had picked up 36 people for questioning.
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