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Zawahiri

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NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Peter S. Green and Jonathan Tirone, Bloomberg News
Ayman al-Zawahiri, the elusive Egyptian surgeon who became al-Qaeda's No. 2 and a spokesman for the jihad movement, is unlikely to achieve Osama bin Laden's level of power and influence, analysts said. While his many video messages have made Zawahiri a key motivational figure in the terror group, his lack of recent combat experience and the emergence of al-Qaeda splinter groups make it hard for him to fill the leadership void created by bin Laden's death, they said. "There is a large number of younger leaders much more proven in combat and much more capable of organizing a threat," said Anthony Cordesman, an analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.
NEWS
January 14, 2006 | By John Walcott and Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A CIA-controlled, unmanned aircraft yesterday fired a missile into a compound just inside Pakistan's border with Afghanistan after the CIA received intelligence that Osama bin Laden's top lieutenant and other senior al-Qaeda members were inside, U.S. intelligence officials said. At least 17 people were killed, but it could not be immediately determined if al-Qaeda's No. 2 leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, was among them, officials said. The officials said that killing Zawahiri or bin Laden would be a "major victory in the war on terror," as one put it, but they acknowledged that it probably wouldn't cripple al-Qaeda or significantly reduce the threat of attacks.
NEWS
March 19, 2004 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ayman al-Zawahiri, the chief deputy in Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda organization, was introduced to religious fanaticism at an early age and adopted anti-Western ideology as an adult, with a fury that shook the world. Now 52, he grew up in a prominent Cairo family and trained as a surgeon before becoming head of Egypt's most dangerous Islamic terrorist organization. When he merged operations with bin Laden in 1998, he became al-Qaeda's strategic and ideological leader, as well as bin Laden's personal physician.
NEWS
October 12, 2005 | By John Walcott INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A 6,000-word letter from Osama bin Laden's second-in-command to al-Qaeda's leader in Iraq outlines the group's strategy to oust American troops from Iraq, create a militant Islamic state there, use it as a base to overthrow the governments of other Muslim nations, and destroy Israel. John Negroponte, the new director of national intelligence, yesterday released a U.S. translation of the July 9 letter from Ayman al-Zawahiri to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and took the unusual step of posting it on his office's Web site.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Alison Fitzgerald, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - When President Obama visits the site of the Sept. 11 terror attacks in New York on Thursday, he will be able to say that with the death of Osama bin Laden, the United States has caught or killed almost everyone allegedly responsible for the carnage. Now U.S. authorities will aim to capture the last major figure involved in the attacks who remains free, Ayman al-Zawahiri, al-Qaeda's No. 2 leader. Information on computers and other items taken from the compound where bin Laden was hiding, combined with the questioning of current detainees, may help lead them to Zawahiri and new al-Qaeda leaders.
NEWS
July 24, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Muslim extremists. American heroes. Betrayed confidences. Barren landscapes. It's the stuff of a summer thriller, but sadly, Joby Warrick's spellbinding book The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated the CIA is a work of nonfiction. And in the end, nine individuals - including seven CIA operatives - were killed. Why was a young Jordanian doctor named Humam al-Balawi, who had never been face to face with American intelligence officers, waved through three security checkpoints at the super-secret CIA outpost in Khost, Afghanistan, near the Pakistan border?
NEWS
May 12, 2012
India orders Pa. teen to be freed JODHPUR, India - An Indian appeals court on Friday overturned the conviction of a U.S. teenager who had been accused of killing his mother while on vacation in western India. The Rajasthan High Court ordered Joncarlo Patton's immediate release from a juvenile detention facility, according to Press Trust of India news agency. It was not immediately clear on what grounds the court overturned his conviction. Patton was sentenced last year to three years in an Indian juvenile detention facility after he was found guilty of slitting his mother's throat at a desert resort in the western state of Rajasthan in August 2010.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Jonathan S. Landay, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The Iraqi branch of al-Qaeda, seeking to exploit the bloody turmoil in Syria to reassert its potency, carried out two recent bombings in the Syrian capital, Damascus, and likely was behind suicide bombings Friday that killed at least 28 people in Aleppo, U.S. officials told McClatchy Newspapers. The officials cited U.S. intelligence reports on the incidents, which appear to verify Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's allegations of al-Qaeda involvement in the 11-month-old uprising.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By John Walcott INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the weather begins to improve along the rugged, remote border between Afghanistan and Pakistan, U.S. and Pakistani forces are stepping up their hunt for Osama bin Laden, his top lieutenant, and Afghanistan's former Taliban ruler, U.S. officials said late last week. The officials said the CIA had moved at least two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), armed with Hellfire missiles, from Iraq to Afghanistan, and that the military's Central Command was sending an unspecified number of Special Forces soldiers from Iraq to Afghanistan.
NEWS
March 20, 2004 | By Malcolm Garcia INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Pakistan forces with artillery and helicopter gunships pummeled suspected militants in the South Waziristan tribal area bordering Afghanistan for the second straight day in an intensified effort to eliminate remnant al-Qaeda forces. At the same time, officials backed off assertions that they were closing in on a senior al-Qaeda leader. An army spokesman, Maj. Gen. Shaukat Sultan, said last night in Islamabad that he could not comment on earlier reports that Ayman al-Zawahiri, a top lieutenant to al-Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden, was surrounded.
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NEWS
May 12, 2012
India orders Pa. teen to be freed JODHPUR, India - An Indian appeals court on Friday overturned the conviction of a U.S. teenager who had been accused of killing his mother while on vacation in western India. The Rajasthan High Court ordered Joncarlo Patton's immediate release from a juvenile detention facility, according to Press Trust of India news agency. It was not immediately clear on what grounds the court overturned his conviction. Patton was sentenced last year to three years in an Indian juvenile detention facility after he was found guilty of slitting his mother's throat at a desert resort in the western state of Rajasthan in August 2010.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Jonathan S. Landay, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The Iraqi branch of al-Qaeda, seeking to exploit the bloody turmoil in Syria to reassert its potency, carried out two recent bombings in the Syrian capital, Damascus, and likely was behind suicide bombings Friday that killed at least 28 people in Aleppo, U.S. officials told McClatchy Newspapers. The officials cited U.S. intelligence reports on the incidents, which appear to verify Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's allegations of al-Qaeda involvement in the 11-month-old uprising.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence and law enforcement officials scrambled Friday to identify and find three men who supposedly planned to travel to the United States from Afghanistan to detonate car bombs in bridges or tunnels this weekend in New York and Washington. Officials said they obtained specific, but uncorroborated, intelligence this week that two or three individuals with close ties to al-Qaeda leaders in Pakistan had entered the United States in a plot to disrupt events planned to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept.
NEWS
July 24, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Muslim extremists. American heroes. Betrayed confidences. Barren landscapes. It's the stuff of a summer thriller, but sadly, Joby Warrick's spellbinding book The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated the CIA is a work of nonfiction. And in the end, nine individuals - including seven CIA operatives - were killed. Why was a young Jordanian doctor named Humam al-Balawi, who had never been face to face with American intelligence officers, waved through three security checkpoints at the super-secret CIA outpost in Khost, Afghanistan, near the Pakistan border?
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Alison Fitzgerald, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - When President Obama visits the site of the Sept. 11 terror attacks in New York on Thursday, he will be able to say that with the death of Osama bin Laden, the United States has caught or killed almost everyone allegedly responsible for the carnage. Now U.S. authorities will aim to capture the last major figure involved in the attacks who remains free, Ayman al-Zawahiri, al-Qaeda's No. 2 leader. Information on computers and other items taken from the compound where bin Laden was hiding, combined with the questioning of current detainees, may help lead them to Zawahiri and new al-Qaeda leaders.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Peter S. Green and Jonathan Tirone, Bloomberg News
Ayman al-Zawahiri, the elusive Egyptian surgeon who became al-Qaeda's No. 2 and a spokesman for the jihad movement, is unlikely to achieve Osama bin Laden's level of power and influence, analysts said. While his many video messages have made Zawahiri a key motivational figure in the terror group, his lack of recent combat experience and the emergence of al-Qaeda splinter groups make it hard for him to fill the leadership void created by bin Laden's death, they said. "There is a large number of younger leaders much more proven in combat and much more capable of organizing a threat," said Anthony Cordesman, an analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.
NEWS
January 14, 2006 | By John Walcott and Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A CIA-controlled, unmanned aircraft yesterday fired a missile into a compound just inside Pakistan's border with Afghanistan after the CIA received intelligence that Osama bin Laden's top lieutenant and other senior al-Qaeda members were inside, U.S. intelligence officials said. At least 17 people were killed, but it could not be immediately determined if al-Qaeda's No. 2 leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, was among them, officials said. The officials said that killing Zawahiri or bin Laden would be a "major victory in the war on terror," as one put it, but they acknowledged that it probably wouldn't cripple al-Qaeda or significantly reduce the threat of attacks.
NEWS
October 12, 2005 | By John Walcott INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A 6,000-word letter from Osama bin Laden's second-in-command to al-Qaeda's leader in Iraq outlines the group's strategy to oust American troops from Iraq, create a militant Islamic state there, use it as a base to overthrow the governments of other Muslim nations, and destroy Israel. John Negroponte, the new director of national intelligence, yesterday released a U.S. translation of the July 9 letter from Ayman al-Zawahiri to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and took the unusual step of posting it on his office's Web site.
NEWS
March 20, 2004 | By Malcolm Garcia INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Pakistan forces with artillery and helicopter gunships pummeled suspected militants in the South Waziristan tribal area bordering Afghanistan for the second straight day in an intensified effort to eliminate remnant al-Qaeda forces. At the same time, officials backed off assertions that they were closing in on a senior al-Qaeda leader. An army spokesman, Maj. Gen. Shaukat Sultan, said last night in Islamabad that he could not comment on earlier reports that Ayman al-Zawahiri, a top lieutenant to al-Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden, was surrounded.
NEWS
March 19, 2004 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ayman al-Zawahiri, the chief deputy in Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda organization, was introduced to religious fanaticism at an early age and adopted anti-Western ideology as an adult, with a fury that shook the world. Now 52, he grew up in a prominent Cairo family and trained as a surgeon before becoming head of Egypt's most dangerous Islamic terrorist organization. When he merged operations with bin Laden in 1998, he became al-Qaeda's strategic and ideological leader, as well as bin Laden's personal physician.
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