CollectionsZimbabwe
IN THE NEWS

Zimbabwe

NEWS
June 27, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ecstatic challengers to President Robert Mugabe celebrated yesterday, sensing a dramatic political shift in the making as Zimbabwe's opposition made major gains in parliamentary balloting. With results in 100 of 120 parliamentary districts announced, the Movement for Democratic Change had won 48 seats and Mugabe's ruling Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front had won 51, officials said. A small independent party had won one seat. The results mean that the opposition, despite widespread violence and intimidation, will have a significant presence in Zimbabwe's 150-seat parliament.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zimbabwe settled back yesterday to wait anxiously for the outcome and the aftermath of two days of voting in the nation's most momentous elections in 20 years of independence. Election observers reported an impressive turnout of the nation's 5.1 million voters, who cast their ballots despite months of intimidation, violence and race-baiting, mostly by supporters of President Robert Mugabe. The first returns are expected late today. Yesterday, several hostile groups of militants from the ruling party patrolled farm areas north of the capital, Harare, shaking their fists at opposition supporters and international observers.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has been a rough month for Evelyn Masaiti. Her house was destroyed, her car was burned, and she was jailed for two days, all because she had the audacity to run as an opposition candidate against Zimbabwe's ruling party. Undeterred by the intimidation, the former secondary-school teacher yesterday cast her ballot and then determinedly drove around her district to encourage voters to the polls in Zimbabwe's crucial parliamentary elections. "I never thought of giving up, because I know I have a lot of support," said Masaiti, 35, a candidate for the upstart Movement for Democratic Change, which is posing the most serious challenge in two decades of President Robert Mugabe's unbroken rule.
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Mapfumo is the dreadlocked star of Zimbabwe's liberation music. Nigel Chanakira is the straitlaced founder of one of Zimbabwe's most successful investment banks. They come from different ends of Zimbabwe's spectrum. But both have managed to attract the wrath of President Robert Mugabe's government by speaking their minds. As Zimbabwe prepares to go to the polls in crucial parliamentary elections tomorrow, the treatment of the two shows the efforts of the government to stifle growing dissent from many quarters.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | By Trudy Rubin
This has been an awful year for sub-Saharan Africa, as violent conflicts have proliferated and HIV/AIDs has spread. So next weekend's elections in the beautiful southern African nation of Zimbabwe have become an important indicator of whether the downward slide can be halted. The contest involves all the key questions haunting the continent: the prospects for democracy, the chances for economic growth and the ability of African leaders to work together to solve Africa's problems.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
White farmers may not be welcome in Zimbabwe these days, but that does not mean they are unwanted elsewhere in Africa. Zimbabwe's northern neighbor, Zambia, has quietly put out the word that it has millions of acres of land just begging for farmers. The land itself is practically free - it can be leased for 50 cents an acre a year. "We have a lot of surplus land," said Duresh M. Desai, Zambia's minister of agriculture. "Our problem is to attract investment to put that land into agricultural production.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The invaders came to Roy Bennett's farm last month. They seized his pregnant wife, Heather, and held a machete to her throat while they forced her to chant slogans praising President Robert Mugabe's ruling party. Then they released her. For 18 days, they occupied the 7,000-acre farm here in Zimbabwe's eastern highlands. In that time, the invaders - many of them veterans of the 1970s battle for black liberation from white minority rule - cleaned out Bennett's house and slaughtered eight head of cattle.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marowa Kunaka, chief of the Seke people and heir of a proud African dynasty, has four lemon trees, five cattle, a hutch full of rabbits, and a yard full of clucking chickens. His turquoise concrete house has no electricity and his water is drawn by bucket from a well. He uses oxen to plow his fields. There is a 25-year-old Peugeot parked behind the house, but it is more decoration than transportation. His farm takes up all of six acres. It's a far cry from the plantations of some of his neighbors.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | By Trudy Rubin
Until recently, southern Africa was the great hope of Africa. It seemed to have moved beyond the civil conflicts that are still ravaging Sierra Leone and other parts of the continent. Traveling through the region, you see impressive progress in building civil society and establishing the rule of law. Diamond-rich, sparsely populated Botswana impresses visitors with its sober, responsible government. The impoverished former Portuguese colony of Mozambique, with its shabby, charming capital and gorgeous coastline, moved from Marxism to democracy and showed promising growth rates before floods dealt it a setback.
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Cecil Johnson
Two wrongs still add up to two wrongs, even if the second wrong is a delayed response to the first. That unassailable axiom of morality and law applies to the social and political tragedy now being played out in Zimbabwe. From a historical perspective, one can find a high degree of justification for some squatters' occupation of about 1,000 of the country's large white-owned farms and ranches. They have long-standing ancestral claims to the land that was stolen from their forebears by the British colonials.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|