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NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
IT BEGAN with tingling and numbness in her feet. It came and went, so Lee Russo, a healthy 39-year-old, ignored the problem. Then she found herself falling down. She got a cane, started wearing leg braces. Her condition continued to worsen. "Sometimes I was so weak I couldn't get out of bed," said Russo, now 43, of Inwood, N.Y. "I suffered. For a long time. " Russo's affliction? She and hundreds of others nationwide say they were poisoned by their denture cream. Numerous lawsuits filed against GlaxoSmithKline, maker of Poligrip, and Procter & Gamble, manufacturers of Fixodent, allege that the companies knew their products were dangerous and did not protect consumers.
NEWS
September 1, 1995 | By Ilene R. Prusher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When 4,000 gallons of zinc chloride poured from the Shannon Chemical Co. here like a river of oily water yesterday, workers had one major worry: The fish. Nearby is Valley Creek, a tributary of the Brandywine Creek that is replete with cold-water trout and is considered a prime fishery for the area. But not to worry. While the liquid is toxic to fish, toxic if inhaled by humans, and generally corrosive, county emergency-hazardous-materials crews were able to contain the spill within an hour and prevent it from getting to the precious water nearby.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011
Bistrot La Minette 623 S. 6th St 215-925-8000 www.bistrotlaminette.com Parc 227 S. 18th St. 215-545-2262 Vintage 129 S. 13th St. 215-922-3095 www.vintage-philadelphia.com Zinc 246 S. 11th St. 215-351-9901 www.zincbarphilly.com  
BUSINESS
March 5, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Some rave about it. Others don't believe it helps much. It's Cold-Eeze, created to fight the common cold. Cold-Eeze is the brainchild of a little company based in Doylestown that employs 16 people. The company, Quigley Corp., may be small, but it has big plans for its product even though, so far, only 8 or 9 percent of all Americans have heard of it, according to Guy J. Quigley, president and CEO. The magic in Cold-Eeze lozenges is supposed to be the zinc. The product is the leader in the market for zinc lozenges for the common cold - a market Quigley said he originated in 1996 that's now occupied by 20 to 30 copycats.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2012 | Jason Wilson
Amis Trattoria 412 S. 13th St. 215-732-2647   Bibou 1009 S. 8th St. 215-767-0731 biboubyob.com Bistrot La Minette 623 S. 6th St. 215-925-8000 bistrotlaminette.com Caribou Café 1126 Walnut St. 215-625-9535 cariboucafe.com   Creperie Beau Monde 624 S. 6th St. 215-592-0656 creperie-beaumonde.com ...
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Under the word immune in the dictionary you will most likely find, among several definitions, the phrase "marked by protection. " Although that sounds like a guarantee from a manufacturer, it aptly describes how the body's immune system fends off germs and viruses. Health experts are trying to determine whether factors such as diet, exercise and mental attitude can affect the mighty immune system, the human being's very own department of defense. These are not easy matters to pin down, mainly because the immune system is very complex and, despite a great deal of medical research, is still not completely understood.
REAL_ESTATE
June 3, 2001 | By Marty Ross FOR THE INQUIRER
Labels bring order to the riot of buds and blooms of every enthusiastic gardener's growing collection of fine plants. They have the same function as name tags at a big cocktail party. Garden plants are not just anonymous clumps of vegetation, and labels help put you on a first-name basis with your flowers. Plant labels also express a gardener's style. A colorful pottery label stamped "chives," poised on a wire stake like a lollipop, is as much a part of the decorative scheme as the pretty herbs around it. A professional-looking zinc label with the plant's scientific name tips you off that this is the garden of a serious connoisseur of plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011 | By Jason Wilson, jason@jasonwilson.com
REMEMBER THAT odd little boom in French bistros a few years ago, right around the time the economy was collapsing around us? Oo la la, we were suddenly transformed into Le Philly , awash in cozy French spots like Bistrot La Minette, Cochon, Zinc, 10 Arts and others. There were so many French places here that our dining scene fostered a radical activist group that staged protests against foie gras in front of several bistros. The trend culminated, as it usually does, when Stephen Starr weighed in with Parc, his $9 million, 800-pound gorilla of a bistro on Rittenhouse Square.
FOOD
February 14, 2001 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Read this list slowly: Oysters Chocolate Honey Strawberries Asparagus Artichokes. Bananas. Now what is the first thing that comes to your mind? Sex, right? Of course. Because all of the above have hot, hot, hot reputations as aphrodisiacs. These are (so it's said) the foods of love, the taste of romance, a veritable blue plate special of sexual arousal. "The only one for which there is any scientific evidence is chocolate," says Jim Coleman, executive chef at the Rittenhouse Hotel.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | By Maralyn Lois Polak
Before I bought a house, I had an apartment so leaky it was like living in a carwash. Those soggy times came to mind one recent midnight, thanks to the Blizzard of '96, when my very expensive, recently installed stamped tin kitchen ceiling begins leaking. Like too many of us in these days of melt, freeze, melt, freeze, I had three feet of snow with nowhere to go on a flat roof. Expecting the worst - a leak leads to a hole leads to a flood - I rushed to my basement for my trusty zinc bucket spattered by cement and clambered double time back up the stairs, where a steady PLUNK/PLUNK/PLUNK articulated the wintry heartbeat of my house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Five years ago, you couldn't tour a house with granite countertops in the kitchen and not hear about it. The real estate agent would proclaim its attributes, and you, as a prospective homeowner, would feel confident that those speckled surfaces were the best. Granite has been the showstopper for years, dazzling with its glossy appearance and high performance. But as more surface materials take center stage, the rock star of countertops is sharing the spotlight with materials that flaunt a hipper vibe: concrete, zinc, bamboo, even glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2012 | Jason Wilson
Amis Trattoria 412 S. 13th St. 215-732-2647   Bibou 1009 S. 8th St. 215-767-0731 biboubyob.com Bistrot La Minette 623 S. 6th St. 215-925-8000 bistrotlaminette.com Caribou Café 1126 Walnut St. 215-625-9535 cariboucafe.com   Creperie Beau Monde 624 S. 6th St. 215-592-0656 creperie-beaumonde.com ...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011
Bistrot La Minette 623 S. 6th St 215-925-8000 www.bistrotlaminette.com Parc 227 S. 18th St. 215-545-2262 Vintage 129 S. 13th St. 215-922-3095 www.vintage-philadelphia.com Zinc 246 S. 11th St. 215-351-9901 www.zincbarphilly.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011 | By Jason Wilson, jason@jasonwilson.com
REMEMBER THAT odd little boom in French bistros a few years ago, right around the time the economy was collapsing around us? Oo la la, we were suddenly transformed into Le Philly , awash in cozy French spots like Bistrot La Minette, Cochon, Zinc, 10 Arts and others. There were so many French places here that our dining scene fostered a radical activist group that staged protests against foie gras in front of several bistros. The trend culminated, as it usually does, when Stephen Starr weighed in with Parc, his $9 million, 800-pound gorilla of a bistro on Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
IT BEGAN with tingling and numbness in her feet. It came and went, so Lee Russo, a healthy 39-year-old, ignored the problem. Then she found herself falling down. She got a cane, started wearing leg braces. Her condition continued to worsen. "Sometimes I was so weak I couldn't get out of bed," said Russo, now 43, of Inwood, N.Y. "I suffered. For a long time. " Russo's affliction? She and hundreds of others nationwide say they were poisoned by their denture cream. Numerous lawsuits filed against GlaxoSmithKline, maker of Poligrip, and Procter & Gamble, manufacturers of Fixodent, allege that the companies knew their products were dangerous and did not protect consumers.
LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Last year, you wrote about what to do about black marks on roofs. You said it was algae that built up from the product used in the shingles, and you gave a remedy for cleaning it off the shingles. Well, I cut your article out for a spring project and, yep, you guessed it, now that spring is here, I cannot find the article. I wonder if you can tell me again how I can remove the unsightly black marks from my roof easily. Answer: Fiberglass asphalt shingles these days have a limestone filler instead of the traditional rag filler, and the limestone promotes the growth of algae that shows up in horrible streaks on roof areas that don't get much sun. Have your roofer nail copper or zinc strips on the peaks above these areas, so rain running over the strips will kill the algae.
REAL_ESTATE
June 3, 2001 | By Marty Ross FOR THE INQUIRER
Labels bring order to the riot of buds and blooms of every enthusiastic gardener's growing collection of fine plants. They have the same function as name tags at a big cocktail party. Garden plants are not just anonymous clumps of vegetation, and labels help put you on a first-name basis with your flowers. Plant labels also express a gardener's style. A colorful pottery label stamped "chives," poised on a wire stake like a lollipop, is as much a part of the decorative scheme as the pretty herbs around it. A professional-looking zinc label with the plant's scientific name tips you off that this is the garden of a serious connoisseur of plants.
FOOD
February 14, 2001 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Read this list slowly: Oysters Chocolate Honey Strawberries Asparagus Artichokes. Bananas. Now what is the first thing that comes to your mind? Sex, right? Of course. Because all of the above have hot, hot, hot reputations as aphrodisiacs. These are (so it's said) the foods of love, the taste of romance, a veritable blue plate special of sexual arousal. "The only one for which there is any scientific evidence is chocolate," says Jim Coleman, executive chef at the Rittenhouse Hotel.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission said yesterday that zinc lozenge-maker Quigley Corp. had agreed to curtail advertisements that make unsubstantiated claims on the health effects of its Cold-Eeze lozenges and Kids-Eeze bubble gum. The announcement was made as another cold season - and another lozenge-buying season - is upon the nation. In a sharp rebuke to the company, the commission said that an investigation had shown that there was no medical evidence to support certain claims concerning zinc lozenges.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Some rave about it. Others don't believe it helps much. It's Cold-Eeze, created to fight the common cold. Cold-Eeze is the brainchild of a little company based in Doylestown that employs 16 people. The company, Quigley Corp., may be small, but it has big plans for its product even though, so far, only 8 or 9 percent of all Americans have heard of it, according to Guy J. Quigley, president and CEO. The magic in Cold-Eeze lozenges is supposed to be the zinc. The product is the leader in the market for zinc lozenges for the common cold - a market Quigley said he originated in 1996 that's now occupied by 20 to 30 copycats.
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