CollectionsZoning
IN THE NEWS

Zoning

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 5, 2009
IN 2004, THE Building Industry Association of Philadelphia commissioned "If You Fix It, They Will Come," a report detailing the city's confusing and complex development process. The report, produced by Karen Black of May 8 Consulting, identified many of the reforms for zoning and planning that are now being addressed by the zoning reform commission. Here is a graphic depiction from the report of the 28 steps required to get the permits and approval required to build a project in the city.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | By Mark Schmerling, Special to The Inquirer
While nearly everyone - commissioners, planners and representative of local institutions - agreed that an institutional zoning ordinance would be beneficial in Abington Township, action has been delayed for at least three to four months. At a public hearing Thursday, the township commissioners voted unanimously to have the township planning commission present a final draft of a proposed institutional zoning ordinance at a continuation of the hearing scheduled for Aug. 13. On May 14, the planning commission recommended amendments to the draft ordinance issued by the township commissioners in February.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
The Whitemarsh Township Planning Commission has recommended that a proposed pest-control business be prohibited from a residential area. The board voted by 5-0 last week to recommend that the township zoning hearing board deny the application, by David V. Barry, for a variance for a house in the 900 block of East Hector Street. "I'm not really ready to support that," said David Lansing, a member of the planning board. "I'm just not prepared to have a chemical business in a residential (area)
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Hobart Rowland, Special to The Inquirer
As Phoenixville residents got their final chance Tuesday to comment on a proposed overhaul of the borough's zoning law, a planned historic district was praised while a rezoning of High Street was criticized. At the second hearing on the proposed ordinance, Borough Council President John Horenci described it as "a complete and total revision" of borough zoning. The 531-page draft is the product of 2 1/2 years of work by the Planning Commission, Horenci said. It is scheduled for adoption at Tuesday's council meeting.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
The Washington Township Council has postponed until August a proposed change in zoning of 19 parcels of land to a new category known as office- residential. The delay is needed to notify the owners of the 19 sitesand nearby residents. Planners failed to do that before bringing the proposed changes to the Township Council last week. As many as 150 people could be affected by the changes and will be notified, said Township Planner Lou Glass. Glass told the council that no notification was made because there was no legal requirement to do so. Councilman Joseph Yost said the township still had an obligation to notify the owners and residents, in case the zoning changes were to jeopardize plans for the lots.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
Langhorne Manor, known for its spacious houses with sprawling grounds, is looking to preserve that tradition with two zoning changes, the first in the borough since 1976. The Planning Commission on Thursday endorsed the zoning amendments, which would increase minimum lot sizes in two of the borough's three zones. The Borough Council will vote on the changes at a meeting beginning at 8 p.m. Tuesday. The changes would apply only to the undeveloped lots in residential Zones A and B. Zone A includes most of the borough's 380 homes.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Swayed by an outpouring of public opposition, the Hatfield Township Board of Commissioners has delayed its decision on a request to change the zoning at Orvilla Road and Route 309 to permit a shopping center. At Tuesday night's meeting, representatives of the developer, Site Development Inc., agreed to negotiate with the township and residents about the commercial zoning on the 12-acre property. The residents live in Lexington Commons, a development behind the proposed 90,000-square-foot shopping center.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | By Lisa Kozleski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Those larger-than-life signs in Pennsauken will be addressed as an issue of zoning, not of morals. Although the township has received dozens of complaints that the recently installed pictures of scantily clad women at the Showgirl Palace in Pennsauken are distasteful and degrading, the available avenue of change rests not in righteousness, but in reasonable size, officials said this week. Township officials met Wednesday with Joe Peters, general manager of the Showgirl Palace, to notify the business of violations of the township's size requirements for signs.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Southampton Planning Commission has reviewed a number of proposed amendments to its zoning and subdivision ordinances. The amendments were proposed by the township Board of Supervisors. The planning commission must review the amendments and then approve the amendments or add revisions before sending the package back to the supervisors. The amendments also were sent to the Bucks County Planning Commission for review on July 18. The supervisors proposed amending the zoning ordinance yard requirements for shopping centers.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
Another stage in a battle over whether to allow small oil businesses in Lumberton industrial zones concluded last night much as it began. The Lumberton planning board voted 5-4 to send a zoning-ordinance amendment allowing that use back to the Township Committee unchanged. The board reviewed the ordinance change after the Township Committee decided at a public hearing Jan. 19 that the amendment needed more clarification. The planning board decided last night that concerns of neighboring Eastampton and Southampton officials and residents would be answered when site plans for oil businesses were presented to the township.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
How should the developer of a luxury apartment complex compensate the city for reneging on an agreement to set aside 25 apartments for low-income Philadelphians? City housing advocates think the only fair solution is for PMC Property Group to pay a penalty to Philadelphia's Housing Trust Fund, to the tune of $5 million, for breaking the agreement, which earned its apartment project a 48-foot height bonus. The developer has other ideas. This week, PMC submitted what is effectively a new zoning application for One Water Street, a 16-story apartment building on the Delaware riverfront, next to the Ben Franklin Bridge.
NEWS
June 8, 2016
A top Philadelphia zoning official said Monday that tenants will not be allowed to move into a luxurious new Delaware waterfront apartment building unless the developer includes 25 affordable units as promised - or offers a suitable alternative, such as ground-floor retail, public art, or a contribution to the city's Housing Trust Fund. The developer of One Water Street, PMC Property Group, took the Kenney administration by surprise recently when it asked to be released from an inclusionary housing deal that it cut with the city in 2014.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Zoning officials have approved plans for a 46-unit townhouse development near 20th and Wharton Streets in Philadelphia's Point Breeze neighborhood, according to the website of the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections. The Zoning Board of Adjustment granted permits Monday for the project, which a development team including Howard Silverman wants to build at a 38,600-square-foot former industrial site. Some members of the surrounding community had objected to the plan, arguing that the land should be used for a commercial or new industrial purpose that creates jobs.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's zoning board postponed a vote on developer Bart Blatstein's plan for an apartment and retail complex at Broad Street and Washington Avenue Wednesday after two of the body's five members were absent from the day's scheduled meeting. The Zoning Board of Adjustment had been expected to vote on the proposal at the hearing, two weeks after members heard testimony on the project and delayed their decision pending further discussion among themselves. But with board chairman Jim Moylan and another member absent from the hearing, vice-chair Carol Tinari announced that votes on such "delayed" business would be held next week so the two can be in attendance.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia zoning officials have reversed course on their approval of developer Bart Blatstein's proposal for an apartment tower, shopping complex and parking garage at the corner of Broad Street and Washington Avenue in South Philadelphia. The Zoning Board of Administration reconvened on late Wednesday to vacate a vote taken earlier in the day that granted the project waivers it needed to be built as planned, according to Sharon Suleta, an attorney for the panel. The board canceled the decision after realizing that it had taken action prematurely, having voted eight days earlier to delay its vote on the project by two weeks for further discussion, Suleta said.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Zoning officials Wednesday approved developer Bart Blatstein's proposal for an apartment tower and outdoor shopping mall atop parking and larger-format stores at the northeast corner of Broad Street and Washington Avenue in South Philadelphia. The Zoning Board of Adjustment voted to grant the project the waivers it needed to be built as planned, said Steve Cobb, chief of staff for City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, in whose district the site is located. The zoning board had said it would delay its vote for two weeks after an April 26 hearing at which neighbors voiced their objections to the proposal, which Johnson also opposed.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
A community group has endorsed plans for a 178-unit apartment project with 20,000 feet of street-level retail at the current site of the Woods Bros. lumber yard in East Kensington. The East Kensington Neighbors Association voted 61-to-33 at a meeting last week in favor of the so-called Woods Square project at 2621 Frankford Ave., the group's zoning chair, John Theobald, said. Developer Michael Vegh's plans for the two-acre site show three five-floor residential structures rising over a green roof atop a single-story podium of shops and parking.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Joseph Neff Ewing Jr., 90, of Newtown Square, an attorney in Philadelphia and a Willistown Township leader for 22 years, died Friday, April 8, at home after a three-year battle with leukemia. The son of Joseph Neff and Anne Ashton Ewing, he was born in Valley Forge. He was a graduate of Haverford School, Princeton University, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Mr. Ewing served in the Marine Corps at the end of World War II in Okinawa, Japan. In 1951, he married Margaret Converse Howe, and they had three daughters.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson proposed legislation Thursday for zoning changes to the northwest corner of Broad Street and Washington Avenue to permit the construction of the residential and retail project known as Lincoln Square. One of the bills shifts the 3.4-acre corner parcel's zoning from industrial to commercial-and-mixed use, while another tweaks the area's land-use bylaws to allow greater ground coverage by structures, along with other changes, Johnson chief-of-staff Steve Cobb said.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Center City restaurant, cafe and live-music venue Milkboy has a new landlord: Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals. The health-care network purchased the 1100 Chestnut St. building occupied by the popular spot last week for $2.1 million, according to Tom Lussenhop, president of Philadelphia developer U3 Ventures, which sold the property. A U3 affiliate bought the two-story, 3,330-square-foot building in 2007 for $2 million, according to records filed with the city. Jefferson spokeswoman Jacqueline Kozloski did not immediately respond to a message asking about its plans for the property.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|