FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 5, 2009
IN 2004, THE Building Industry Association of Philadelphia commissioned "If You Fix It, They Will Come," a report detailing the city's confusing and complex development process. The report, produced by Karen Black of May 8 Consulting, identified many of the reforms for zoning and planning that are now being addressed by the zoning reform commission. Here is a graphic depiction from the report of the 28 steps required to get the permits and approval required to build a project in the city.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | By Mark Schmerling, Special to The Inquirer
While nearly everyone - commissioners, planners and representative of local institutions - agreed that an institutional zoning ordinance would be beneficial in Abington Township, action has been delayed for at least three to four months. At a public hearing Thursday, the township commissioners voted unanimously to have the township planning commission present a final draft of a proposed institutional zoning ordinance at a continuation of the hearing scheduled for Aug. 13. On May 14, the planning commission recommended amendments to the draft ordinance issued by the township commissioners in February.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
The Whitemarsh Township Planning Commission has recommended that a proposed pest-control business be prohibited from a residential area. The board voted by 5-0 last week to recommend that the township zoning hearing board deny the application, by David V. Barry, for a variance for a house in the 900 block of East Hector Street. "I'm not really ready to support that," said David Lansing, a member of the planning board. "I'm just not prepared to have a chemical business in a residential (area)
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Hobart Rowland, Special to The Inquirer
As Phoenixville residents got their final chance Tuesday to comment on a proposed overhaul of the borough's zoning law, a planned historic district was praised while a rezoning of High Street was criticized. At the second hearing on the proposed ordinance, Borough Council President John Horenci described it as "a complete and total revision" of borough zoning. The 531-page draft is the product of 2 1/2 years of work by the Planning Commission, Horenci said. It is scheduled for adoption at Tuesday's council meeting.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
The Washington Township Council has postponed until August a proposed change in zoning of 19 parcels of land to a new category known as office- residential. The delay is needed to notify the owners of the 19 sitesand nearby residents. Planners failed to do that before bringing the proposed changes to the Township Council last week. As many as 150 people could be affected by the changes and will be notified, said Township Planner Lou Glass. Glass told the council that no notification was made because there was no legal requirement to do so. Councilman Joseph Yost said the township still had an obligation to notify the owners and residents, in case the zoning changes were to jeopardize plans for the lots.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
Langhorne Manor, known for its spacious houses with sprawling grounds, is looking to preserve that tradition with two zoning changes, the first in the borough since 1976. The Planning Commission on Thursday endorsed the zoning amendments, which would increase minimum lot sizes in two of the borough's three zones. The Borough Council will vote on the changes at a meeting beginning at 8 p.m. Tuesday. The changes would apply only to the undeveloped lots in residential Zones A and B. Zone A includes most of the borough's 380 homes.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Swayed by an outpouring of public opposition, the Hatfield Township Board of Commissioners has delayed its decision on a request to change the zoning at Orvilla Road and Route 309 to permit a shopping center. At Tuesday night's meeting, representatives of the developer, Site Development Inc., agreed to negotiate with the township and residents about the commercial zoning on the 12-acre property. The residents live in Lexington Commons, a development behind the proposed 90,000-square-foot shopping center.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | By Lisa Kozleski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Those larger-than-life signs in Pennsauken will be addressed as an issue of zoning, not of morals. Although the township has received dozens of complaints that the recently installed pictures of scantily clad women at the Showgirl Palace in Pennsauken are distasteful and degrading, the available avenue of change rests not in righteousness, but in reasonable size, officials said this week. Township officials met Wednesday with Joe Peters, general manager of the Showgirl Palace, to notify the business of violations of the township's size requirements for signs.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Southampton Planning Commission has reviewed a number of proposed amendments to its zoning and subdivision ordinances. The amendments were proposed by the township Board of Supervisors. The planning commission must review the amendments and then approve the amendments or add revisions before sending the package back to the supervisors. The amendments also were sent to the Bucks County Planning Commission for review on July 18. The supervisors proposed amending the zoning ordinance yard requirements for shopping centers.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
Another stage in a battle over whether to allow small oil businesses in Lumberton industrial zones concluded last night much as it began. The Lumberton planning board voted 5-4 to send a zoning-ordinance amendment allowing that use back to the Township Committee unchanged. The board reviewed the ordinance change after the Township Committee decided at a public hearing Jan. 19 that the amendment needed more clarification. The planning board decided last night that concerns of neighboring Eastampton and Southampton officials and residents would be answered when site plans for oil businesses were presented to the township.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
AN ISLAMIC advocacy organization is suing a Bucks County township for discrimination after the town's zoning board rejected an application to erect a mosque. According to the lawsuit filed yesterday by CAIR-Philadelphia in federal court, Bensalem Township is demonstrating "burdensome, discriminatory and unreasonable land use regulations" by blocking local Muslims' ability to build a mosque. The proposed Islamic worship site would be the first in the suburban town just north of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan to replace beloved Center City diner Little Pete's with a glitzy boutique hotel is on hold until early next year amid opposition to a bill that would clear the way for the massive proposed redevelopment at 17th and Chancellor Streets. The concerns of a hospitality labor union, a Center City civic group, and restaurant loyalists have stalled a rezoning bill sponsored by Councilman Kenyatta Johnson that would allow a 12-story Hudson Hotel to be built on a block that has been home to the restaurant since the 1970s.
SPORTS
December 5, 2014 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
THE EAGLES were rolling, first-and-10 at the Dallas 20, leading 14-7 in the second quarter of what would become their 33-10 Thanksgiving victory over the Cowboys. Jeremy Maclin had just toured the entire width and more than half the length of the field on a diagonal path, taking a short Mark Sanchez pass 58 yards. The Cowboys were reeling. First snap after the big play, Sanchez dropped back, looked at Darren Sproles on a screen to his right, saw there were blue shirts in front of Sproles, and fired farther down the same sideline to a wide-open Brad Smith, who had thrown a perfunctory block on the screen setup and now had maybe one Dallas player between him and the end zone.
SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
All week, the questions about how the Eagles are going to handle J.J. Watt this Sunday were numerous and persistent. Center Jason Kelce, preparing to play for the first time since undergoing Week 4 abdominal surgery, said all the usual things about how smart and fierce Watt is, how hard it is to prepare for an opponent who moves around the line so much. Finally, though, after question number eleventy-billion about Watt, Kelce said this: "We don't care who we're playing, we're playing our offense.
SPORTS
October 29, 2014 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
THERE ARE a ton of statistical reasons why the Eagles shouldn't be 5-1 right now. Start with a quarterback who is 28th in the league in passing, 29th in interception percentage, 29th in completion percentage and 27th in yards per attempt. Move on to a defense that is 23rd against the run and is on pace to give up a franchise-record number of touchdown passes. This a team with the fifth-worst turnover differential in the league and the third-most number of giveaways. Their star running back was averaging just 2.9 yards per carry until the Giants came along wearing a red suit and black boots.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bill expected to pass this week in the legislature would gut protections for Pennsylvania's cleanest streams, critics say. The proposal, which would remove a requirement that developers leave a 150-foot forested buffer along some streams, has drawn the opposition of environmental groups, land conservancies, and wildlife groups such as Trout Unlimited. It is backed by the Pennsylvania Builders Association and officials in rural northeastern Pennsylvania, who say that the requirement is arbitrary and that they need flexibility.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Logistics Partners and its proposed Marcellus Shale Mariner East project have public utility status, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission ruled Thursday. The decision was a victory for Sunoco, which is repurposing a petroleum pipeline to transport Marcellus Shale ethane and propane to Marcus Hook. The commission noted that Sunoco's pipeline routes and services have been certificated as public utilities since the early 1930s. "Sunoco's amended petitions adequately plead sufficient facts for the commission to find that it is both a 'public utility' and a 'public utility corporation,' " said PUC vice chairman John F. Coleman Jr. and commissioner Pamela A. Witmer in a joint motion approved 4-1 by the commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
You may think that Philadelphia is run by the mayor in City Hall. In fact, there are 10 mini-mayors around town who rule their turf with near-absolute power: City Council's district representatives. They alone determine what projects get built, where bike lanes are located, whether residents can nominate their neighborhoods for historic status, and much, much else. Their power comes largely from their ability to veto zoning bills. That may explain why some Council members remain intent on undermining the new zoning code, which was designed to simplify development in Philadelphia by reducing the need for special bills and variances.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal housing Secretary Julián Castro visited the West Philadelphia Promise Zone on Friday, but not everyone went along on the tour. Angry members of the Mantua Civic Association, one of the main local groups working for change, said they weren't invited. "I thought it was supposed to be collaborative," said association president DeWayne Drummond, who stood, steaming, outside the tour starting point at the Mount Vernon Manor apartments while Castro, Mayor Nutter, Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell, and others went inside.
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