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Zoning

ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The first time Omar Blaik met with residents of West Philadelphia's Spruce Hill neighborhood to discuss his proposal for a large, new apartment house on Baltimore Avenue, he did something unusual in the high-stakes world of real estate development: He showed up without a PowerPoint. There were no gauzy architectural renderings, no images of sleek, modern kitchens, no floor plans. Instead, he handed out blank sheets of drawing paper and colored markers. "You have nothing to oppose," Blaik declared, explaining that the building hadn't yet been designed.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delighting many residents but disappointing township officials, the Lower Makefield zoning board declined Tuesday to grant variances to husband-and-wife veterinarians seeking to build an equine hospital on a parcel of Patterson Farm, a large swath of open space owned by the township. Board members cited a variety of reasons for the 5-0 decision, including the potential for the hospital to change the character of the neighborhood around the farm, and setting a poor precedent by parceling out the land to private entities.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Ben Finley and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
SAYLORSBURG, Pa. - If only he'd sought help. Legal assistance, housing help, food to put on his table. Then, people in Monroe County say, the man accused in the shootings at a township meeting might not have opened fire over a property dispute. "Somewhere along the line, he could have sought some type of [legal] advice," said Jim Mannello, publisher of West End Happenings, a newsletter that serves four townships, including Ross, where the deadly shooting occurred Monday night. "There are a lot of people with problems," Mannello said.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Q : There's a new dog park in our area, and the rules are generally pretty good, as long as people follow them. We have a couple of people who bring in multiple dogs at once, including one person who is being paid to exercise dogs. We don't have a limit on the number of dogs a single person can bring in, but after a couple of incidents, we're thinking about it. What do you think? A : People with multiple dogs, no matter how well-mannered their pets are, simply cannot stay on top of what all their dogs are doing once the animals fan out. That's why many parks have guidelines that address professional dog walkers or people with many dogs of their own. Everyone who takes a pet into an off-leash dog park needs to be responsible for the behavior of that animal, watching to be sure that the dog is neither bully nor victim, and that no one gets hurt.
SPORTS
July 8, 2013 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
RAY EMERY was comfortable in Chicago. His body likely was still recovering from celebrating his first Stanley Cup championship with the Blackhawks last month. He'd played in nearly half of Chicago's regular-season games, a big part of their 24-game unbeaten streak. The Blackhawks wanted to give him a raise. A gaudy Stanley Cup ring was on the way. There was no real reason to leave. Emery said as much last week. In fact, as recently as Tuesday night, the Flyers were operating under the assumption that Emery would be returning to Chicago.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Do you remember when you wanted mail? I don't. If you do, you must be younger than I am, or have a better memory, which is basically the same thing. Bottom line, I'm not sure when this happened, but there came a time when mail started to suck. Correction. I know exactly when this happened. When I grew up and started paying my own bills. We can all agree that bills are no fun, but that's not even the problem I have with my mail. Because at least bills are important.
SPORTS
June 17, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most difficult task for young pitchers is to have command of the strike zone, and failure to do so keeps so many in the minor leagues. Lehigh Valley righthander Phillippe Aumont is a classic example. The Phillies rave about his stuff, but his inability to throw strikes consistently caused his demotion to the IronPigs. He averaged 6.9 walks per nine innings this season when the Phillies sent him down. "He is like a lot of others in that they are a work in progress," Lehigh Valley manager Dave Brundage said.
SPORTS
May 31, 2013 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
CHARLIE MANUEL saw a lot of things that will stick in the darker recesses of his mind even after the Phillies muted them with a 4-3 victory over the Red Sox that sounded plenty of uplifting notes. There was Ben Revere breaking in on a line drive that ended up sailing well over his head for a triple, there was Domonic Brown colliding with Jimmy Rollins on a shallow pop fly, there were runners left standing like middle school dancers along a gymnasium wall. Manuel does not like these things, and he has bemoaned them throughout this stop-and-start Phillies season.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Clark DeLeon
This is a war story told by an eyewitness. Kevin Purcell does the driving - in a Prius, no less - as we visit the battlefields of his youth, familiar places he hadn't set foot on in decades. Here's where somebody got shot, here's where somebody got stabbed. And here, he tells me, is where "grown white men were swinging baseball bats at grown black men who were swinging back with their belts and broom handles. " For a boy of 10, as Purcell was in 1969 when these events took place in his Southwest Philadelphia neighborhood, it all seemed unreal.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After a young woman in her neighborhood committed suicide in April, Pamela Robb vowed to attend the Camden Trauma Summit. "If one of us is hurting, we're all hurting," said Robb, 58, the tenant association president at the Northgate II high-rise in North Camden. A Camden resident for a half-century, Robb was among 150 citizens, clergy, and public health and safety professionals who gathered Monday at the Cooper Medical School of Rowan University. The relentless toll that violence exacts on Camden, a big small town that's been called America's most dangerous city, was the focus of the summit.
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