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Zoo

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BUSINESS
May 12, 1995 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Zoo may be good at feeding animals, but when it comes to satisfying hungry people, that's another matter. After years of complaints from visitors about the quality of the hot dogs, hamburgers and fries, the zoo's fast-food workers have turned in their aprons. McDonald's recently has begun serving up its regular menu, as well as traditional zoo favorites. That's right, McPopcorn anyone? How about some McPeanuts? It's something of a first, McDonald's officials said.
NEWS
March 10, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
There are many fine things to be done with a warm afternoon toward the end of winter - ride a bike, work in the yard, pack a picnic. On Sunday, about 28,000 people - many of them parents with their children - decided it was time to go to the zoo. Yesterday, some of the zoo's long-term residents were hanging out with the kids, too.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
The tiger that leaped out a North Philadelphia window and into the hearts of Philadelphia died at the zoo yesterday morning, apparently from a sudden illness. Zookeepers found a lifeless Corona, the cub who grew up at 7th and Master streets, when they arrived for work at 8 a.m. The 8-month-old cub, who had lived at the zoo since his owner was busted for having an endangered species in August, seemed fine when zookeepers checked on him around 5 p.m. Tuesday. "Preliminary results indicate that Corona may have succumbed to an acute viral infection," said Antoinette Maciolek, spokesperson for the zoo. "There are certain strains of virus known to cause sudden death in exotic cats.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1990 | By Fran O'Byrne and Bernadette Balcer, Special to The Inquirer
In the New Jersey Pine Barrens, there is a zoo whose residents include Rudolph, a deer hit by a car on Christmas Eve; Dancin' Gambler, a monkey who showed up one day at an Atlantic City casino, and Sugar Ray, a rooster rescued from a cockfight. The Popcorn Park Zoo in Forked River also houses former circus performer Simba the declawed lion, and Arnette the pig, found strolling across the Delaware Memorial Bridge. Clearly, this is no ordinary zoo. Since 1977, abandoned, injured and elderly animals have found a home in this unusual place, operated by the Associated Humane Societies, a nonprofit charitable organization headquartered in Newark, N.J. The zoo cares for a wide assortment of creatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
"Zed" is how the English pronounce the letter Z. "Nought" is how they say "zero. " Thus, A Zed and Two Noughts, the title of a 1985 Peter Greenaway film, could be read as z-zero-zero (zzz). Or it could be read as a roundabout way of spelling Z-O-O. Let's just say you could read it either way and you would be correct. Set in and around an archetypal zoo - the actual location of this one is Rotterdam - A Zed and Two Noughts meditates on most things zoological, including the origins of life, the evolution of man and beast, and the negligible line between the higher and lower orders.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
Firefighters were battling a two-alarm blaze at the Animal Kingdom, a zoo in Bordentown. Firefighters responded to a call at about 8:40 p.m. A building which houses puppies and other domestic animals was reported to be on fire. No exotic animals or endangered species were kept in the building, police said. The animals are being evacuated. The zoo houses animals including monkeys, camels and giraffes, according to the zoo's website. - Kristin Holmes  
NEWS
April 7, 1990
It shouldn't be up to you and us to join in cleaning up, painting up and fixing up the Zoo. That's the sort of thing the city should be responsible for, right? Right. But the city is in such desperate financial straits it has drastically cut the Class 500 program, under which the Zoo would have received almost three-quarters of a million municipal dollars. Even raising the admission fee isn't enough to meet that shortfall. So unless volunteers do what has to be done at the Zoo, there's a good chance it won't get done.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
The teacher called his home a petting zoo. The animal welfare agent, who found a dead puppy in a frying pan on the teacher's stove, called it a "zoo of horrors. " Tri Ngo, a suspended Camden High School teacher and Vietnamese immigrant, was to stand trial today, accused of animal abuse. The charges are based on a spring raid during which authorities found nearly a dozen dogs and a half-dozen puppies - alive, but in deplorable condition. The raiders also found the bones of a puppy in the frying pan, two other dead pups in cardboard boxes and a fourth in the trash, according to Tom Shiflet, an enforcement officer for the New Jersey SPCA.
NEWS
April 29, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Victoria is a sociable, well-liked 12-year-old who enjoys arts and crafts and other creative projects. Museums delight her, and so does the zoo. She especially likes the giraffes. Her activities include swimming lessons at the Y, bike riding, and listening to rhythm and blues. She is a Girl Scout and recently collected cans to help clean up the environment. She is in fifth grade and receives special help in reading. Her favorite books are the Harry Potter and Goosebump series.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rocky took the stage at 12:30 p.m. Sunday in Cape May Court House to pick a winner in the women's World Cup soccer finals - the U.S. vs. Japan. No, not that Rocky. This Rocky is the Cape May County Park and Zoo's Siberian tiger and the top cat at the Jersey Shore. The free Cape May zoo offers vacationers a break from sea and sand, and expects to host 500,000 visitors in 2015, up from 450,000 last year. On Sunday, parents, children, and assorted strollers pressed up against newly installed, handwoven steel wire mesh - which replaces old-fashioned chain-link fencing - around Rocky's grassy habitat.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
'When animals attack . . . " is both the name of one of those ridiculous docu-specials Fox used to run, drawing an audience in with salacious footage of nonhumans going berserk, and the premise of Zoo , the adaptation of the James Patterson novel of the same name. Perhaps those Fox specials had more depth than this CBS summer offering, which premieres at 9 p.m. Tuesday. Mad Men 's James Wolk plays Jackson Oz, a guy with the kind of name that exists only in paperback airplane thrillers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2015
* LARRY KRAMER IN LOVE & ANGER. 9 tonight, HBO. Portrait of playwright/AIDS activist Larry Kramer ("The Normal Heart") commemorates his 80th birthday, a milestone he reached on Thursday. *  ZOO. 9 p.m. Tuesday, CBS3. James Wolk stars in adaptation of a James Patterson bestseller, playing a zoologist who, while running safaris in Africa, begins to realize that other animals may be out to get us. If this doesn't get Fox to bring back "When Animals Attack," nothing will. *  SCREAM.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's the cutest animal? Koalas? Sure. Meerkats? Love 'em. Capybaras? Check. Hippos, prairie dogs, even iguanas - they all make the list. But, sorry guys, the title is all wrapped up once you see a red panda. The endangered, bambooo-eating native of the Himalayas, aka Ailurus fulgens , is about the size of a house cat (well, a big, well-fed one) and has a bushy ringed tail and raccoon-like markings. But it's not related to its namesake, the giant panda (which is a bear - and, yeah, also cute)
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE - It started out as a simple petting zoo, with some barnyard animals, a few spider monkeys, and one aging lion. But in 37 years, the Cape May County Zoo has evolved from a one-trick-pony kind of place to a ranking on Trip Advisor as the No. 3 zoo in the nation for visitor satisfaction. It also has one of the most highly accredited breeding programs in the country for such species as American bison and snow leopards. "It truly has grown to become one of the jewels in our county," said Diane F. Wieland, director of the Cape May County Department of Tourism.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A private school bus carrying a class of schoolchildren crashed into the end of a guardrail on the Schuylkill Expressway on Thursday morning, police said. A representative of Hope Church School in East Oak Lane said the children had been taken to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia as a precaution, but were uninjured. Sharneca Reid, a parent of one of the children on the bus, said in an Instagram post that the class had been on a trip to visit the Philadelphia Zoo. Reid wrote that her daughter had "hit her face" in the crash but was in good condition.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Honi and Kira spared no time exploring their new gorilla highway through the trees above the Philadelphia Zoo. Motuba, the zoo's male silverback, was the shy one: He climbed the stairs and then retreated to a more familiar field in the gorilla enclosure. The overhead path that opened Wednesday is the fourth in a series of trails that have been lauded as not only innovative but transformative for zoos, taking the experience - for the animals that live there as much as the Homo sapiens who visit - into new realms.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Amazing animal sculptures made from recycled material will be on display at the Philadelphia Zoo through Oct. 31. "Second Nature" features works by 12 artists from around the globe (including some from Philly) using recycled and repurposed materials, like a pink eight-foot crocodile made entirely of chewing gum. Philly artist Leo Sewell shows off his 175-pound rhinoceros sculpted from 250 silver serving trays collected from scrap piles, junk sales, and curbsides. Sculptures range from bunnies and gorillas to flowers made from a car hood.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2015 | Jenelle Janci, Daily News Staff Writer
A CROCODILE made of bubblegum, a giant gorilla composed of car parts and tiny creatures carved from crayons are all trying to tell you something: Recycling is important, and our everyday actions have an effect on our friends in the animal kingdom. "Second Nature," opening Saturday, is the Philadelphia Zoo's latest feature experience. The exhibit's name holds a two-pronged meaning: Trash gets a second life in art pieces, and recycling can become "second nature" to humans. "Second Nature" is free with regular zoo admission.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A LINE OF TRAFFIC stretched from the Philadelphia Zoo across Center City and into New Jersey yesterday. "Yes, and we were in it," said Lee, a woman who led a group of 60 kids and 10 adults from a YMCA in Princeton, N.J. Their two-bus caravan took 2 1/2 hours to get to the zoo, then faced a serpentine line to pick up tickets to get in, said Lee, who didn't want her last name published. Zoo staff seemed ready for the crush of people, even if the roads were not. "The zoo is lively and a great place to be right now," said Dana Lombardo, zoo spokeswoman.
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