CollectionsZucchini
IN THE NEWS

Zucchini

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 5, 2006
State legislators are preparing to return to Harrisburg, still fearful of the fallout in the November elections from the pay-raise scandal. We take you now to the backyard of State Sen. Seymour Boon, who has ventured cautiously to his fence for a chat with his neighbor, a fellow named Burgess . . . Sen. Boon: Morning, neighbor! Burgess: Morning, senator! Senator: So you're talking to me again? What a relief. I was worried that you were still mad about the pay raise. Burgess: Oh, I'm still plenty mad. But we're neighbors.
FOOD
April 14, 1993 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
When zucchini is cooked plain, it's a very dull vegetable. But when you add a dash of olive oil, a sprinkling of fresh mint and basil, and a dusting of grated lemon zest, you transform a boring vegetable into one of good taste. Toss this revitalized zucchini with the butterfly-shaped pasta called farfalle, and you have a dish of grace and harmony. Matching the sauce with the pasta shape is very important. In this case, delicate slices of barely wilted zucchini are a perfect match for the dainty butterfly wings of the cooked farfalle.
FOOD
July 26, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Skim milk, low-fat cheeses, buttermilk and yogurt are all relatively low in calories. The calcium content of these lean low-fat dairy foods gives them added "health food" appeal. Calcium helps regulate blood pressure and promotes bone growth. Hypertension and osteoporosis are ailments much on the mind of today's maturing population, so dairy foods aren't just kidstuff. However, the high animal fat content of full-fat cheeses puts them off limits for cholesterol-watchers. Today we share a slim idea made with low-fat cheese and other lean dairy ingredients.
FOOD
August 26, 2004 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
Summer without zucchini? Impossible! Low in calories and inexpensive, yellow or green zucchini is tender and mild-tasting, accepting of many herbs and seasonings. Sauteed, stir-fried, steamed, baked, broiled, grilled, pickled, preserved, or sliced or grated raw in salads, this is one versatile veggie. Thus, if you have an excess of zucchini on hand, think of it not as too much of a good thing, but as good fortune. Zucchini is easily camouflaged - all but invisible when used in unexpected ways such as hidden in plain sight in a colorful pasta dish, disguised in pizza, or concealed as the secret ingredient in a moist tea bread, recipes for which accompany this article.
FOOD
July 24, 1994 | By Waltrina Stovali, FOR THE INQUIRER
Zucchini is the hamster of the vegetable world. Ever try keeping two hamsters because just one might be lonely? Of course, you asked the pet shop to be sure they were both male or both female. But likely, within weeks, you leaned the pet shop worker had made a mistake. Similarly, have you ever tried to raise just enough zucchini for your family needs? In either case - hamsters or zucchini - you probably soon had more than enough to share with friends, neighbors and casual acquaintances.
FOOD
July 10, 1996 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Zucchini is the Cinderella of the vegetable world. Unadorned, it has little appeal. Serve it raw in a salad and it isn't noteworthy. But have faith. Like a lot of unflashy things, zucchini will reward those who recognize its potential and treat it well. Italians saute it with garlic and olive oil. The flesh becomes tender, and the flavor is transformed from bland to sweet and buttery, although still mild. For more than a subtle change, Italian cooks match zucchini with robust ingredients such as sausage, red wine and provolone.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When farm-market managers in Pennsylvania gathered about five years ago to discuss strategy, the folks from the Easton Farmers' Market, one of America's oldest, came with a PowerPoint presentation and focused on their biggest attraction - zucchini racing. More than 1,000 people go to Easton every year to watch zucchini racing, they said, so Sandy Guzikowski of Guzikowski Farms in Lower Makefield went home from that meeting and built a zucchini track. The Lower Makefield Farmers' Market opened in the summer of 2007 and even got the local member of Congress to come to the inaugural race.
FOOD
February 16, 1997 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
I know people like to eat zucchini raw, but I think it tastes like a cucumber that didn't get enough rain. Of course, that's only my opinion. But cooked, it becomes sweet, pulpy and very enjoyable. Like mushrooms and eggplant, zucchini is better with other vegetables than it is alone. Tomatoes, garlic and onions are natural partners to zucchini as the French vegetable melange ratatouille deliciously proves. Zucchini's delicate taste also goes well with seafood. It doesn't overwhelm it. The following recipe borrows a little from ratatouille and from the seafood stew bouillabaisse, to produce a scallop, zucchini and tomato sauce.
FOOD
August 9, 1995 | By Sheldon Margen and Dale A. Ogar, For The Inquirer
When a friend showed up recently with a huge box full of beautiful, organically grown zucchinis to share with the staff, we were grateful and thanked her profusely - even though we wondered how we could possibly use this much zucchini. The problem is that people don't seem able to grow just enough zucchini for their own use. In fact, zucchini crops are so prolific that entire cookbooks have been written about the vegetable. But zucchini is only one of several wonderful summer squashes.
FOOD
October 23, 2015
Blessed Trinity The sixth graders were eager to learn. Our muffin recipe called for grated zucchini, and four of the students had never tried it before. The students' post-comments: "amazing" and "awesome. " Allyson Velez said it was her first time baking and, "It was pretty memorable. " Jenna Welsh said, "We used teamwork, we each took turns. I enjoyed cooking with my friends. " - Glenn Petrucci TeamUp Philly/ Shepard Rec Center Riley Brown thought the class would be "much more basic" and was delighted to learn we would be preparing a healthy meal in our very first class.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
December 18, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
The students from Wiggins Prep Elementary in Camden were wound up for their last day of cooking class: They'd be preparing dinner for parents, siblings, and guests, showing off the skills they'd learned over the last seven weeks. And their excitement was bubbling over. The teachers were having issues of their own. "I just want to let you know what we are working with today," said Edith Bobb, one of the three teachers who have helped with the class. Dawn Wilson had put on two different-colored socks that morning, and Susan Lore came to school wearing two different shoes.
FOOD
October 30, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
José Rios, a fifth grader at Wiggins Prep Elementary school in Camden, had a pressing question as he arrived for his second week of healthy-cooking classes: "Are we going to make a cake? Can we, please?" After such success with banana-zucchini muffins for our first class, I hoped this group would be open to lots of fruits and vegetables. José hoped it was the first of many baked treats. "We'll make dessert for our last class, when we invite your families," I said. "Dessert is special, not for every meal.
FOOD
October 23, 2015
Blessed Trinity The sixth graders were eager to learn. Our muffin recipe called for grated zucchini, and four of the students had never tried it before. The students' post-comments: "amazing" and "awesome. " Allyson Velez said it was her first time baking and, "It was pretty memorable. " Jenna Welsh said, "We used teamwork, we each took turns. I enjoyed cooking with my friends. " - Glenn Petrucci TeamUp Philly/ Shepard Rec Center Riley Brown thought the class would be "much more basic" and was delighted to learn we would be preparing a healthy meal in our very first class.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'Do you eat breakfast before school in the morning?" I asked the fifth graders at Wiggins Prep Elementary School in Camden. "No," said Aa'myrah Bethea, 10. "I get up and put my uniform on, then I get back in bed till my mom calls me. " Aa'myrah, who prefers to be called Coco, is not unlike many kids her age who would gladly skip breakfast for a few more minutes of sleep. So on the first of eight weeks of classes teaching kids how to prepare simple, delicious, healthy meals, breakfast was Lesson One. This fall, we are cooking at the well-used kitchen of Baptist Temple Church, the 98-year-old stone stalwart on South Fourth Street in Camden across from the public school, where there was no kitchen option.
FOOD
May 15, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Five starched new aprons were lined up on the counter outside the kitchen, one for each student arriving for the last cooking class at Roberto Clemente Middle School in North Philadelphia. Sharon Ward, the food service worker who had been cooking with us all semester, had surprised each student with a gift of a new apron, and not the white standard issue but brightly colored ones they had wished for in class. The kids spotted them and dashed with excitement to pick their color.
FOOD
April 17, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The most rewarding part of teaching kids to cook is watching them progress. They not only build very practical skills in the kitchen - learning how to hold a knife, chop onions, peel carrots, sauté and roast - they also learn to keep an open mind. They learn to be willing to try something new. And they are often surprised at how much they enjoy things they never thought they would. Two weeks ago, when we were making honey mustard chicken wings with eighth graders at Roberto Clemente Middle School, Emily Gonzalez lamented: "I don't like mustard, can I have mine plain?"
FOOD
October 30, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The new commercial kitchen at the Free Library of Philadelphia is, by far, the most beautiful, tricked-out kitchen in which I've ever cooked. We made lovely meals in the simple convent kitchen at St. Martin de Porres in North Philadelphia when the after-school cooking program began in 2012, and then in the public school cafeteria kitchens the following fall and spring. As the program grew over the last two years, with volunteers cooking in schools in Philadelphia and Camden, some classes made feasts with just an electric frying pan. The point is, you don't need a high-end kitchen and fancy equipment to cook a nice dinner.
FOOD
May 2, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
With sugary, salty, addictive junk food everywhere, it's a challenge to persuade kids not to indulge. Of course, they've heard about eating fruits and vegetables. But in our healthy-cooking class at Lawton Elementary, I tried to appeal to their fifth-grade values: good looks, good grades, athletic prowess. Eating healthy food gives you more energy, makes you look better, helps your brain work better, makes your body respond better at sports, I told them. "It's like a car," I said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Eileen Glanton Loftus, For The Inquirer
My birthday is Sept. 21, and when I was a child, my mom would sometimes call me "the last rose of summer. " It was a sweet turn of phrase, but just an ordinary one for my mom. With her melodic Irish accent, she delighted people with virtually anything she said. My mom was raised on an Irish country road that led to the rocky coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Her family raised chickens, grew vegetables, and tended roses. She could run up and down the verdant green hills, or dip her toes in the sea. She truly lived in nature, and could never get enough of it. When she and my father came to America in the 1960s, they were lucky enough to land in Elmira, N.Y. A river ran through our town, giving her miles of banks for walking.
FOOD
October 25, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The five young chefs were ready with their cookbooks and cutting boards when I arrived for our second class at Bayard Taylor Elementary in North Philadelphia. "What's boo-ca . . . ti-ni?" said Bianca Perez, 11, sounding out the first word in the recipe for our second meal, bucatini with spicy summer squash and white beans. "It's a kind of pasta," I said, digging into the bag of groceries to show them. "It's a little thicker than spaghetti but hollow in the middle. " In addition to teaching these fifth graders healthy, inexpensive recipes for the next two months, I wanted to introduce them to different foods.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|